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Summer 2013 Catalog

June 17 - July 26, 2013
  
     Below is a list of the courses, special events and ongoing summer 2013 activities at all three locations (Fairfax, Reston and Loudoun). Unless otherwise noted, classes beginning with an F are held at Tallwood in Fairfax, an R at United Christian Parish in Reston, and an L at Mason's Loudoun County location in Sterling.




100 Art and Music


F101  "Let's Do It, Let's Fall in Love"; The World of Cole Porter

Saturday, 10:00–12:30, June 22
One session
Church of the Good Shepherd
Instructor: Dan Sherman

Born to wealth, Cole Porter created both the words and music to some of the cleverest, funniest and most romantic songs ever written. This course will tell the story of Porter’s fabulous career, which produced almost 1,000 songs in Broadway shows and Hollywood musicals. We will learn the background behind some of his best-known songs and listen to a sampling, including clips from great movie musicals. Participants may wish to obtain a copy of the book Cole Porter: Selected Lyrics, edited by Robert Kimball (American Poets Projects).
Dan Sherman, who has taught OLLI courses on opera and also some great American theatre composers, will draw on his exceptional collection of CDs and DVDs to help us enjoy Cole Porter’s songs, using a multimedia approach to combine pictures, films and sound recordings.

R102  The Ongoing Pleasure of Music

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, July 9, July 23
Two sessions
Instructor: Gloria Sussman

This is a class dedicated to the enjoyment of the world’s greatest classical music. With the help of DVDs and YouTube, we will explore a wide variety of musical themes, composers and genres. We will listen to the artists of today and yesteryear and come away with renewed appreciation for their contributions to the performing arts.
Gloria Sussman has been teaching at OLLI since 2000 and continues to provide entertaining listening programs for OLLI at Reston.

 

L103  The Tallwood Trio

Wednesday, 11:50–1:15, July 10
One session
Instructors: Alan Wenberg, Eric Henderson, David Hirsch
The Tallwood Trio was established on the Tallwood campus in October 2012. With a passion for music, a love of jazz, and particular interest in the Great American Songbook, the group’s repertoire consists of tunes by Duke Ellington, George Gershwin and Cole Porter. Their OLLI debut at the Valentine’s Day party was welcomed by an enthusiastic audience, and they regularly play for various OLLI events. A jam session series begun during the spring term encourages participation by musicians and singers within the OLLI community. The Tallwood Trio is pleased to be making its Loudoun campus debut.
Alan Wenberg plays piano for various functions around town including corporate events, parties, weddings and Bar/Bat Mitzvahs. His latest CD, Shaken, Not Stirred, can be heard in part on his website,
Eric Henderson is a retired CIA employee and an OLLI member since 2000. A jazz bass player who worked frequently with area bands in the 1960s and 1970s, he has happily come out of retirement to join OLLI's Tallwood Trio.

David Hirsch, drummer, played his first gig in New York’s Catskill Mountains (aka The Borscht Belt) in the mid-1950s. Having worked the New York club date circuit as a leader and sideman, he is pleased to be now working with Alan and Eric.

 

L104  Piano Performance: Ali Mushtaq

Wednesday, 11:50–1:15, June 26
One session
Instructor: Ali Mushtaq
Come spend a pleasant afternoon at OLLI enjoying a piano recital featuring works by Mozart, Schumann, Prokofiev and others. Ali Mushtaq, a Washington-area statistical contractor, is the winner of the 2011 Washington International Piano Artists Competition for piano amateurs. He has also taken second at the Bosendorfer Amateur Piano Competition in Vienna, Austria, and participated in several other amateur piano competitions across the United States. This one-hour recital will include discussions of the works.

 

 

L105  Watercolor Painting with Pen and Ink Accents

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, June 20–June 27, July 11–July 25
Five sessions
Instructor: Sigrid Blalock                    
The class will begin with a review of pen and ink drawing techniques. These techniques will then be used to enhance watercolor paintings of subjects from nature: flowers, fields, trees, fruits and vegetables. Materials needed: one set cake watercolor paints, 12–18 colors; assorted brushes; container for water; one pad or block cold pressed watercolor paper, 9” x 12”, 140 lb. wt.; drawing pens with permanent black ink; pencil; ruler; and plastic sheet to cover work space.
Sigrid Blalock, instructor of drawing and painting, has degrees from Syracuse University and American University. Her teaching experience includes several years with OLLI and The Smithsonian Associates.



200 Economics & Finance


F201  Understanding Today's Financial Roller Coaster

Tuesday, 9:40–11:05, June 18
One session
Instructors: Katherine Hurley, Cindy Fox
The daily news overpowers us with reports of financial crises throughout the world while economists, politicians and professional money managers fill the media with sharply contrasting opinions. Many of us have lost confidence both in the media and the experts. We are confused about the impact of Cyprus, the Euro and our own housing markets. After experiencing major reductions in our investments, have we returned? What is the new normal? Katherine Hurley and Cindy Fox come back to OLLI to lead a discussion about these issues and to answer our concerns in an open, interactive forum.
Katherine Hurley, president of Infinity Financial Group, and Cindy Fox of First Portfolio Lending, each with more than 20 years of industry experience, will provide insight into current conditions and strategies.

 

F202  What Next for Health Reform?

Wednesday, 9:40–11:05, July 24
One session
Instructor: Bill Scanlon
What to do about health care, especially how to expand insurance coverage and control costs, was one of the more contentious issues of the past campaign. The Affordable Care Act’s insurance expansions are underway, albeit not as originally envisioned. With no progress on deficit reduction and the start of the sequester, attention focuses again on potential entitlement reform and, in particular, on reducing the growth of Medicare spending. This presentation will look at
• how the insurance expansions are being rolled out across the country,
• options being considered for reducing Medicare spending growth,
• risks posed by different choices for access to care or quality of care for Medicare enrollees, and
•potential benefits in terms of reduced out-of-pocket costs for Medicare enrollees.
Bill Scanlon is an economist who has worked on health care policy for more than 35 years. He was managing director of health care studies at the General Accounting Office and a Medicare Payment Advisory Commission member. He is now with the National Health Policy Forum at George Washington University.

 

 

F203  The Tom Crooker Investment Forum

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, June 19–July 24
Six sessions
Moderator: Al Smuzynski
The Investment Forum, which meets weekly throughout the year, addresses investment topics of particular interest to retirees. A weekly agenda is distributed, and each session begins with an open discussion of recent events in the economy and financial markets as well as their impact on investment decisions. Member presentations and discussions typically include topics such as recent market indicators, discussions of individual stocks, bonds, funds (mutual, exchange-traded and closed-end), REITS, options, commodities, master limited partnerships, sectors, allocations and investment strategies. We use analyses and data from the financial press. The forum website, www.olligmu.org/~finforum/, includes the agendas and articles of interest submitted by members.
Al Smuzynski is a retired bank regulator and an advocate of affordable housing. He currently serves on the boards of Virginia Community Capital and Community Capital Bank of Virginia.

 

L204  Loudoun County Economic Development

Tuesday, 9:40–11:05, June 18
One session
Coordinator: Robbie Milberg

A business development manager from the Loudoun County Department of Economic Development will present an overview of the department’s efforts to enhance and diversify the tax base by recruiting more companies to Loudoun and by assisting existing Loudoun businesses with expansion. We will discuss the industries the department targets as well as services designed to grow future employers.

 

300 History


F301  Life in Post-War Germany--A Historical Perspective

Tuesday, 11:50–1:15, June 18
One session
Instructor: Ed Janusz

The course presents the major events in Germany during 1945–1950 (Potsdam, start of the cold war, repatriation/emigration/immigration policies of the Western powers, Marshall Plan, Berlin airlift) from two perspectives. The first is based on the reminiscences of the people who lived there. The focus is on how those events and policies were viewed by them and how they affected their lives. The second is a historical perspective on those events and policies with the benefit of 70 years of hindsight. 
Ed Janusz, an OLLI member for seven years, is an engineer by education and profession and an amateur military historian by avocation. He retired after a career in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the aerospace and computer services industries. He, along with his family, spent the post-war period in displaced persons camps in the British Zone of Germany. His book, Fading Echoes from the Baltic Shores, was recently published.

 

 

F302  Our Shenandoah

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, July 2–July 9
Two sessions
Instructor: Bob Webb

Most of us experience the Shenandoah Valley from high above on Skyline Drive or while dueling with 18-wheelers along I-81. But the valley itself has a grand, sweeping story to tell. As author Julia Davis wrote, “The Shenandoah is legend, and it is history.” This illustrated program will consider both legend and history from past geologic eras to the present with a focus on the Civil War years. Few places were as strategic or suffered as much as the valley. We will look at the civilian experience in particular, especially that of Winchester and its women—the “devils” of Winchester, as Lincoln’s war secretary saw them. The illustrations and handouts may prompt you to explore and enjoy the valley anew—not just its Civil War history but its theater, music, museums and back roads as well.
Bob Webb was an editor at The Washington Post for 32 years and has presented many OLLI programs on American and world history and the press.

 

 

F303  The Republic of Korea Presidency: 1961 to 1980

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, July 16–July 23
Two sessions
Instructor: Dave Lynch

The first session will cover the coup d’état led by Maj. Gen. Park Chung-hee in 1961, the rise of Park to the presidency of South Korea by 1963, and the highlights of his 17 years of rule that ended with his assassination October 26, 1979. We will discuss the decision by the United States to provide military reinforcements to counter the potential for North Korean aggression as South Korea was in upheaval. The second session will cover Maj. Gen. Chun’s investigation of the assassination of President Park, actions Chun took based on the investigation, and Chun’s ultimate election to the presidency in August 1980. We will also discuss the unusual invitation from the Republic of Korea National Assembly in 1988 asking U.S. Ambassador Gleysteen and Gen. Wickham to testify in Seoul concerning events during their service in Korea.
Dave Lynch is an OLLI member and a retired Army officer. He first trained in Korea in 1962. He served in Korea from 1978 to 1982 and was executive assistant to the commander of ROK/U.S. Combined Forces Command (Gen. Wickham) July 1979 to June 1982.

 

 

F304  “Though small in number, their influence is large."

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, June 19–June 26,
July 10–July 17
Four sessions
Church of the Good Shepherd
Coordinators: Michael T. Kelly, Emmett Fenlon

Written in 1929 by the first National Park Service director, the above words resonate among National Park rangers who recognize and appreciate the power and responsibility underlying them. Few greater pleasures exist than experiencing the United States through our national parks—homes for many of our country’s cultural, natural and recreational resources. Our Greater Washington National Parks system, for example, preserves more than 131,000 acres of park and forested lands, 717 miles of trails, 250 miles of riverfront, 152 statues and more than 3,000 historic structures. Beyond this local bounty, the National Park Service boasts nearly 400 additional units where one truly can experience America. While nothing replaces visits to these parks, veteran park rangers remain fair substitutes. We invite you to experience four more of your national parks through the stories, recollections and insights of four current National Mall and Memorial Parks rangers who once served in other parts of our America.
National Park Service rangers have participated with OLLI in nearly 75 thematic courses, special events and trips since 2001.

 

F305  Homeland Defense World War II Style

Thursday, 9:40–11:05, July 11
One session
Instructor: Raoul Drapeau

This is a timely topic, but the concept of homeland defense is not a recent one. During World War II there were numerous clever schemes the United States military developed to engage civilians and detect and blunt any attempts at invasion or attack. There were camouflage of aircraft plants, barrage balloons protecting the Great Lakes’ Soo Locks, the Civil Air Patrol, patrol blimps, massive gun emplacements protecting the entrance to Delaware Bay and internment of Japanese and German-American civilians. 
Raoul Drapeau is a high-tech entrepreneur, author, inventor and commercial arbitrator. He holds electrical engineering degrees from Cornell University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and has published numerous articles in technical and historical journals. He has developed and teaches adult education courses in intellectual property protection, creativity, sustainable energy and engineering, global warming and maritime history.

 

 

F306  Alaska at War

Thursday, 9:40–11:05, July 18
One session
Instructor: Raoul Drapeau
This course will cover two major construction projects in Alaska during World War II: the Alaska military highway and the massive but troubled Canol oil pipeline project. We will also discuss the Japanese invasion of the Aleutian Islands and the resulting forced evacuation by the U.S. Army of the native Unangax and their resulting cultural destruction.
See F305 for instructor information.

 

F307  Russia Study Group

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, June 20–June 27, July 11–July 25
Five sessions
Moderator: Gordon Canyock

Class limit: 30
Russia continues to play a major role in international affairs, often as a thorn in the side of its neighbors and of the United States. Russia wields considerable economic power in Europe and Central Asia and retains a huge nuclear arsenal. This seminar will examine various dichotomies of contemporary Russia including Putin’s “power vertical” concept vs. emerging centrifugal political opposition; state control of key economic sectors vs. privatization and modernization; reform vs. inertia in the military; and deteriorating U.S.–Russian relations. Each week, short articles or website references will be emailed to the class to prepare for the discussions that will follow a brief lecture.
Gordon Canyock is a long-time OLLI member with a BA in political science from Cornell University and an MA in Soviet Area Studies from the University of Kansas. He served as the commandant of the U.S. Army Russian Institute, military attaché in the U.S. Embassy Moscow, and later worked in Russia for the State Department as a special assistant for humanitarian aid.

 

 

R308  World War II Leaders and Their Dogs

Tuesday, 9:40–11:05, July 9
One session
Instructor: Kathleen Kinsolving

Kathleen Kinsolving will discuss and sign her new book, Dogs of War, a captivating account of three unforgettable canines who were devoted companions to three of the most powerful American leaders during the Second World War. Fala, President Roosevelt’s fetching Scottish terrier, gained the reputation of being the most famous “First Dog” in U.S. history and won the heart of the nation. Willie, the feisty bull terrier who became General Patton’s cherished comrade, was a continual source of delight, providing much relief while the general waged war on Hitler. And finally there’s Telek, General Eisenhower’s and Kay Summersby’s treasured Scottie. He helped ignite the most famous love story in Allied military history. Dogs of War celebrates the unconditional, loving bond between man and his best friend, pays tribute to World War II history, and resurrects a forbidden wartime romance.
Kathleen Kinsolving teaches English at Centreville High School in Clifton and in 2010 penned her father’s biography, Gadfly: The Life and Times of Les Kinsolving—White House Watchdog, for WND Books. Kathleen is proud to return to WND with her second book, Dogs of War.

 

 

R309  History of Maritime Exploration

Thursday, 9:40–11:05, July 11
One session
Instructor: Ben Gold

From the time of ancient myths and legends to the Age of Exploration, mariners have constantly defied existing boundaries and expanded the known world. Who were these explorers and where did they go? And why did they go if they thought the world was flat? Join the explorers, real and fictional, from Odysseus, Beowulf and Sinbad to Columbus and Captain James Cook as they uncover new worlds.
Ben Gold, a longtime OLLI member and frequent OLLI presenter, is a retired naval officer with three separate tours as navigator. He has a deep interest in all things nautical.

 

 

R310  History of Navigation

Tuesday, 9:40–11:05, July 23
One session
Instructor: Ben Gold

Since the earliest times when sailors rarely left the sight of land until today when a GPS device the size of a wristwatch gives directions to any place, maritime navigation has had an extraordinary history. Throughout this time, mariners have devised ingenious methods to tell where they were and to figure out how to get where they intended to go. Navigation in its beginnings was considered an art. Starting in the 18th century, with its major strides in mathematics and astronomy along with improvements in mechanization, navigation became a science.
See R309 for instructor information.

 

 

R311  Famous Pirates

Thursday, 9:40–11:05, July 25
One session
Instructor: Ben Gold

Piracy is as old as recorded history. But our picture of the typical pirate—peg leg, eyepatch and parrot—does not tell the whole story. Hear the story of pirates from the 13th century BCE to the present, including not only Blackbeard and Captain Kidd but also women pirates such as Anne Bonny and Mary Read. And hear the stories of the Jewish pirates of the Caribbean and today’s Somali pirates.
See R309 for instructor information.

 

 

L312  Some Interesting Civil War Topics: POWs and New Mexico

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, June 20–June 27, July 11–July 18
Four sessions
Instructor: Keith Young

This course examines two Civil War topics that do not often receive attention by themselves: prisoners of war and the Civil War in the far west. The initial session is an overview of the treatment and handling of the prisoner-of-war problem by both sides. The follow-on session records the outlook of one Confederate POW at Point Lookout, Maryland, and shows his innovative means in making the best of an uncomfortable situation. The remaining two sessions deal with the little-known Civil War campaign conducted during the winter and spring of 1862 in New Mexico Territory. A small number of troops on each side fought over an immense territory that had mineral riches and wide-open spaces.
Keith Young, a retired naval officer with an interest in military history, lectures on many Civil War and World War II topics.

 

L313  Shackleton's Unbelievable Voyage

Tuesday, 9:40–11:05, July 16
One session
Instructor: Raoul Drapeau
Ernest Shackleton was one of those extraordinary adventurers during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration. With his ship trapped in ice and no hope of rescue, he and five others took a small open boat on an 800-mile trip over the rough South Atlantic to South Georgia Island, and three of them then trekked 30 miles over the uncharted interior. Shackleton eventually rescued all his crew.
See F305 for instructor information.

L314  Speedway to Sunshine

Thursday, 11:50–1:15, June 27
One session
Instructor: Raoul Drapeau

Henry Flagler was a wealthy partner of John D. Rockefeller who built a series of Gilded Age hotels along Florida's east coast and a long, but short-lived railroad line over the ocean from Miami all the way to the Florida Keys to help boost trade with Cuba, Latin America and the Panama Canal builders. With some justification, that line was also called Flagler's Folly.
See F305 for instructor information.

L315  Topics in Italian History

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, June 18–July 23
Six sessions
Instructor: Doug Foard

Six lectures could not possibly cover the entirety of Italian history. In fact, that subject could command six years of lecturing. Nevertheless, this course will approach the subject by selective “dives”; e.g., imperial Rome, pontifical Rome, the Renaissance, the Risorgimento, Mussolini and the post-war resurgence. Even in this abbreviated process we’ll touch upon some of the greatest triumphs of Western art, music, culture and politics. The Italians have taught their Western brothers magnificent lessons in the art of living, even including the use of the fork. For those interested in following this course with a trip to Italy, a tour led by the instructor is being planned for the fall. The tour, which includes stays in Rome, Florence and the vicinity of Naples, leaves October 23 and returns November 5. Request more details from Doug Foard.

Doug Foard has a PhD in history from Washington University and served for 12 years as executive secretary of Phi Beta Kappa. His specialization is Spanish history, and he is author of The Revolt of the Aesthetes and The Imperious Laird: John Campbell, the Fourth Earl of Loudoun.


400 Literature, Theater & Writing

F401  Poetry Workshop

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, June 18–July 23
Six sessions
Moderators: Mike McNamara, Jan Bohall
Class limit: 18

This workshop allows both novice and experienced poets the opportunity to share their work with others and to receive suggestions for improvement. Workshop members should bring an original poem in draft or revised form to each session. Two poems should be sent to the office for duplication one week before the first workshop and a third poem brought to the first session.
Mike McNamara, an OLLI member, has been published in several literary journals and magazines and has been a recipient of awards in the Poetry Society of Virginia’s annual competitions.
Jan Bohall, also an OLLI member, has had poems published in various periodicals and won awards in the 2012 Poetry Society of Virginia contest.

 

 

F402  The Art of the Theatrical Designer

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, June 25–July 16
Four sessions
Class limit: 25
Instructor: Howard Vincent Kurtz

What exactly does a theatrical designer do? Learn about the art of design from a theatrical perspective. This course presents a basic introduction to theater design, including text analysis, the design and build process, and tech rehearsals through opening night. A fee of $8 will be collected at the time of registration for the script of The Dining Room by A.R. Gurney which will be used as our example.
Howard Vincent Kurtz is an associate professor of theater and head of the Design/Tech Program at George Mason. Professor Kurtz was honored to receive Mason’s Oustanding Excellence in Teaching Award and the Fenwick Library Fellowship for Research Award. He is a professional union costume designer who has costumed at many regional and local theaters in the Washington, D.C., metro area. He was honored to receive the Helen Hayes Outstanding Costume Design Award. Website: HVKurtz.com.

 

F403  Wild about Wilder: Billy"s Best

Tuesdays, 11:30–1:30, June 18–July 23
Six sessions
Instructor: John Henkel

He may not be quite the household name that Alfred Hitchcock is, but Billy Wilder is widely considered one of the finest filmmakers of all time. His movies remain true classics of the golden age of cinema. A partial list: Some Like It Hot (which the American Film Institute named the top film comedy of all time); Sunset Boulevard; The Apartment; and Lost Weekend. In this class, we’ll watch and discuss six of Wilder’s best, and we'll learn what went on behind the scenes and maybe hear a little juicy gossip.
John Henkel is a film enthusiast who loves to share his cinematic zeal with fellow OLLI-ites. Now in his fourth year as an OLLI member, he previously has taught two film history classes for OLLI.

 

 

F404  Let's Study a Play Together: The 39 Steps

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, June 19–July 3
Three sessions
Coordinators: Doris Bloch, Marianne Metz
Class limit: 28

The objectives of this course are to read and discuss a play and to have fun doing it in a participatory group setting. Prior to each class meeting we will read the assigned scenes independently, and during class we will take turns reading the parts out loud. After the reading we will analyze the action. All members of the group will be encouraged to participate fully in readings and discussions. The script is a radio play adapted from the book, The 39 Steps, by John Buchan. The 39 Steps is a spy thriller, set just before WWI, and the action takes place in London and Scotland. We will meet a mysterious secret agent, an unwilling accomplice, a romantic partner, a master criminal, an ineffective police force—all the elements required for a riveting suspense story. The plot has also been the basis of a Hitchcock film and a BBC rendition. We likely will view snippets of one or both. There is a $10 fee paid at registration to obtain the text.
Doris Bloch has been a member of OLLI for eight years and is a co-chair of the Literature, Language and Theater Resource Group. Marianne Metz, also an OLLI member, is a   co-chair of the Music and Art Resource Group.

 

 

F405  The Butler Did It: A Brief History of British Murder Mysteries

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, July 10–July 17
Two sessions
Instructor: Kay Menchel

This two-week class will take a lighthearted look at the evolution of British murder mysteries from the Queens of Crime (Christie, Allingham, Marsh and Sayers) to the 21st century Tartan Noir authors (Rankin and Brookmyre). No reading ahead is required. Excerpts from many of the books discussed will be available in the classroom. We will also watch some TV and movie clips together. Pipes and Deerstalker hats optional.
Kay Menchel, who grew up in Yorkshire, England, is a lawyer who also has an MA in English literature from George Mason. She always enjoys sharing her passion for modern English literature.

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F406  Four American Poets: Their Voices and Visions

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, June 20–June 27, July 11–July 18
Four sessions
Instructors: Brenda Cheadle, Barbara Nelson, Kathryn Russell

American poets speak in a variety of specifically American voices, exploring diverse visions of the American culture or the natural landscape. Their work helps us to see more clearly, to feel more acutely and to understand more deeply what we see and think and feel. They illuminate our past and project visions of the future. This series includes a rich selection of poems, enhanced by accompanying audiovisual resources. Walt Whitman—Kathryn Russell; Langston Hughes—Barbara Nelson; Robert Frost and Elizabeth Bishop—Brenda Cheadle.
The instructors, retired Fairfax County Public School teachers, are OLLI members who share a love of the written and spoken word.

 

 

R407  Raising Demons: Jane Austen"s Portrayal of Children

Tuesday, 9:40–11:05, June 18
One session
Instructor: Beth Lambert

The modern reader of Jane Austen may find trouble understanding her 18th century language, certain social practices of the time, or the apparently always-formal relationship between the sexes. Yet one aspect of her novels does not need to be explained but simply enjoyed and that is her portrayal of certain human situations that resonate through the centuries. Her description of out-of-control spoiled children is among the top in the category of “some things never change.” But like all things Austen, these scenes serve a purpose. Using examples from Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice and Mansfield Park we will discuss those purposes, as well as enjoy her description of scenes that we have all experienced.
Beth Lambert, an OLLI member, is a retired professor of English at Gettysburg College, where she taught courses on all aspects of the 18th century. Her biography of Edmund Burke was published by the University of Delaware Press.

 

R408  From Literature to Film: The Big Sleep

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, June 18–July 2
Three sessions
Instructor: Bob Zener

Raymond Chandler’s 1939 novel, The Big Sleep, is a classic of the noir detective story genre and is widely recognized as a considerable literary achievement. Its film version, starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, is a classic of noir film. There are important differences between the two. In this class, we will spend the first session analyzing the novel, the second watching the film, and the final session discussing the differences. The second session will run a half hour long to accommodate the film length (nearly two hours).
Bob Zener is a retired lawyer and an OLLI member. He has taught two courses on literature and film—one on James Joyce’s The Dead and one on Philip Roth’s Goodbye, Columbus. He has also taught (with Kathryn Russell) both a course on T.S. Eliot and a course on King Lear and A Thousand Acres.

 

 

R409  Literary Roundtable

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, June 19-July 24
Reston's Used Book Shop at Lake Anne
Six sessions
Moderators: Janice Dewire, Carol Henderson

Class limit: 23
This short-story discussion class will conclude the anthology: The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Short Stories, edited by Tobias Wolff who describes these stories as realistic and convincing and a reaction to the postmodern style of story. Authors this term include Jamaica Kincaid, Joyce Carol Oates, Tim O’Brien and John Edgar Wideman. Registrants provide their own copies of the book, a 1994 Vintage paperback from Random House available for $11 to $16 from bookshops and online vendors.
Janice Dewire and Carol Henderson are enthusiastic Literary Roundtable participants and former OLLI Board members who took on the moderator role some years ago for this popular course, one of the longest running in Reston.

 

 

R410  The Butler Did It: A Brief History of British Murder Mysteries

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, June 20–June 27
Two sessions
Instructor: Kay Menchel

This two-week class will take a lighthearted look at the evolution of British murder mysteries from the Queens of Crime (Christie, Allingham, Marsh and Sayers) to the 21st century Tartan Noir authors (Rankin and Brookmyre). No reading ahead is required. Excerpts from many of the books discussed will be available in the classroom. We will also watch some TV and movie clips together. Pipes and Deerstalker hats optional.
Kay Menchel, who grew up in Yorkshire, England, is a lawyer who also has an MA in English literature from George Mason. She always enjoys sharing her passion for modern English literature.

 

R411  Telescoping Time

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, June 20–June 27, July 11, July 25
Four sessions
Instructor: Jane Catron

This class is being offered in response to students’ requests that the Telescoping Time class of last winter be continued. Again the poems we study will revolve around the subject of time though we will not include any previous poems. Class members are encouraged to participate—class discussions were a major factor in making the winter course so lively and stimulating. One does not have to have been in the previous session to join this one. Copies of the poems will be given out in class.
Jane Catron is a retired English teacher who taught 26 years at McLean High School. For the last ten years she has offered many classes at OLLI both in poetry and in novels.

 

 

R412  Political Fun and Intrigue: Summer Film Fest

Thursdays, 2:15–3:40, June 20–June 27, July 11, July 25
Four sessions
Instructor: Glenn Kamber

Come and enjoy some “cool” political leaders on a hot summer day. From comedy to intrigue, you will enjoy the thrills, chills and frills of governance. As in the real world, these politicians will make you laugh or cry and often both. As always, refreshments will be served. Films will be announced one week ahead of showing. The first movie will be Truman starring Gary Sinise.
Glenn Kamber, an OLLI member, will continue to conduct film series, often dubbed by his wife as “Glenn’s favorite movies he’d like to share with you,” until his movie collection is exhausted.

 

L413  The Butler Did It: A Brief History of British Murder Mysteries

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, July 2–July 9
Two sessions
Instructor: Kay Menchel

This two-week class will take a lighthearted look at the evolution of British murder mysteries from the Queens of Crime (Christie, Allingham, Marsh and Sayers) to the 21st century Tartan Noir authors (Rankin and Brookmyre). No reading ahead is required. Excerpts from many of the books discussed will be available in the classroom. We will also watch some TV and movie clips together. Pipes and Deerstalker hats optional.
Kay Menchel, who grew up in Yorkshire, England, is a lawyer who also has an MA in English literature from George Mason. She always enjoys sharing her passion for modern English literature.

 

 

L414  Specialized Theater Makeup

Wednesday, 9:40–11:05, June 26
One session
Instructor: Kathie West

We will enjoy learning about the basics of theatrical makeup used for non-human characters. Volunteers will be made up if they wish. A full example of the makeup for the musical Cats will be demonstrated along with wigs. Come and see how all this is done.
Kathie West, an OLLI member, is a former high school theater teacher at Robert E. Lee High School and Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology.

 

 

L415  German Literature: Thomas Mann

Wednesday, 9:40–11:05, July 10
One session
Instructor: Vera Wentworth

Thomas Mann is considered the most important novelist of 20th century German literature. He gained fame and recognition early in his career with his novel Buddenbrooks: The Decline of a Family (1901) which won him the Nobel Prize in 1929. Mann’s work is suffused with the dilemma of the artist trying to conform to ordinary life and yet stay true to his art. This conflict between what Mann calls the rational, intellectual forces and the sensuous, life-affirming ones constitutes the major theme of his entire work. In “Death in Venice,” an established, mature writer gives in to his passion for a young boy and in the process loses his dignity. This long short story, “Novelle” in German, traces the moral decline of the protagonist Gustav Aschenbach with irony and symbolism, resulting in a gripping narrative. We will view clips of Visconti’s 1960’s film of the novella to evaluate how he transferred the story to the screen. Please read any edition of “Death In Venice” before class.
Vera Wentworth holds a PhD in English and has taught on the college level for 30 years. Much of her academic career was spent at the University of Maryland and Prince George’s Community College where she held the position of chair of literature. In retirement she became a member of OLLI where she has taught a variety of literature courses.

 

L416  Novelist and Former D.C. SexCrimes Prosecutor, Allison Leotta

Thursday, 11:50–1:15, June 20
One session
Instructor: Allison Leotta

Allison Leotta will discuss her work in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in D.C. and her transition to writing novels that draw on her experience. For 12 years, Leotta was a federal prosecutor specializing in prosecuting crimes of sex and domestic violence and crimes against children. She was dubbed “the female John Grisham” for her first book, Law of Attraction, which The Washington Post called “a racy legal thriller . . . taking on a still-taboo subject.” David Baldacci called the sequel, Discretion, a “first-rate thriller.” Strand Magazine named it a Top 10 Book of 2012. Speak of the Devil will be published this August. The American Bar Association has named her blog, The Prime-Time Crime Review, one of the best legal blogs in America three years in a row. Her weekly recaps are carried by The Huffington Post.
Allison Leotta went to Michigan State University and Harvard Law School. She lives in Washington, D.C., with her two sons and her husband, Michael Leotta, who also served as a federal prosecutor and is now a defense attorney.

 

L417  Will the Real Richard III Please Step Forward

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, June 27, July 11–July 25
Four sessions
Instructors: Richard Wilan, Beth Lambert

We will examine Shakespeare's portrayal of Richard III contrasted with how historians view him. Was Shakespeare's version unfair Tudor propaganda? Or was the real Richard as bloody and Machiavellian as in the play? We will be looking at the current discovery of Richard's skeleton, at both modern and 16th century historians, and at the play itself. Students will need a copy of the play in any edition.
Richard Wilan received a BA from Amherst College, an MAT from Harvard University and a PhD from the University of Maryland, where his dissertation was on Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida. He recently retired from Northern Virginia Community College where he taught writing and Shakespearean literature for many years.
See R407 for Beth Lambert’s information.

 

600 Religious Studies



F601  Faith, Doubt and Tradition: A Teaching and Sharing Seminar

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, June 20–June 27, July 11–July 25
Five sessions
Instructor: Steven C. Goldman
Class limit: 15

This seminar will explore how people come to faith, why they may doubt their faith, and how tradition shapes one’s religious and spiritual expressions. Each session will begin with a 20-minute introduction to the issues for discussion. The class size is limited to 15 to allow a lively exchange of ideas and experiences. Some of the major topics include
• Do we practice our religion because we are born into it or because we believe it?
• Is “Truth” about the nature and character of God discernible? If so, how?
• Is it possible to know what God expects of us regarding our beliefs and deportment?
• What happens when we have faith and then lose it? Can faith be fully restored or will there always be doubt?
• Why not be a “spiritual non-believer” (one who acts according to lofty precepts but does not believe in a personal deity)?
This seminar welcomes members of all faith traditions, as well as those who doubt or don’t believe.
Steven C. Goldman is chair of the Religious Studies Resource Group at OLLI and has taught numerous courses on alternative understandings of biblical doctrine.

 

 

R602  The Historical Paul

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, June 25–July 2
Two sessions
Instructor: Jack Dalby

St. Paul never knew the earthly Jesus. But as Professor Bart Ehrman notes, “next to Jesus himself, the most important figure for the development of earliest Christianity was the apostle Paul.” In these two fast-paced, academically based lectures, we will discuss our sources for knowing the historical Paul, their strengths and limitations, and the impact of Paul’s singular theology on the early Christian movement. Questions we will cover include: How did Paul go from being a persecutor of early Christians to becoming their leading proponent; what was Paul’s mission to the gentiles; how does Paul’s theology compare with the theology of Jesus and his followers; what was the purpose of Paul’s letters; was Paul the author of all of his 13 letters; and did Paul intend to found a new religion? Questions during class are encouraged. Having a copy of the New Testament, while not required, would be helpful.
Jack Dalby, president of White Oak Communications, is an OLLI member and a self-taught student of the historical Jesus and early Christianity. He holds a BS in Communication Arts from James Madison University and has taken classes from the graduate History Department at George Mason.

 

 

L603  Difficult Texts of the Bible

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, June 19–July 24
Six sessions
Instructor: Steven C. Goldman

The Hebrew Scriptures and the New Testament include a number of texts that pose ethical and practical challenges for believers because they don’t appear to mesh with the major doctrines taught by their respective faiths. In this course, we will examine many of these texts and review how they have been justified by some and criticized by others.
See F601 for instructor information.

 

 

650 Humanities and Social Sciences


F651  Evolution of the Cold War

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, June 19–July 17
Five sessions
Instructor: Richard Melanson
Class limit: 30

This discussion class will focus on the Soviet and American strategies for global preeminence from World War II to 1962. It will compare and contrast the American and Soviet “empires” in Europe and Asia, the German question, the development of nuclear strategy, superpower competition in the Third World, and the Cuban Missile Crisis. We will use as the required text John Lewis Gaddis’s We Now Know: Rethinking Cold War History (ISBN 0-19-878071-0), one of the first books to extensively use Soviet and Chinese archives. For the first class students should read chapters one and two.
During a 38-year academic career OLLI member Richard Melanson taught international relations and American foreign policy at UCLA, Kenyon, Brown and the National War College. He holds a PhD in international relations from The Johns Hopkins University.

 

F652  Introduction to the French Renaissance

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, June 20–June 27
Two sessions
Instructor: Elisabeth Wolpert

“Renaissance,” French for “rebirth,” perfectly describes the intellectual and economic changes that occurred in the 16th century. During that period (1515–1610), France emerged from the economic stagnation of the Middle Ages and experienced a time of financial growth. Also, and perhaps most importantly, the Renaissance was an age in which artistic, social, scientific, religious and political thought turned in new directions. Join us as we explore and discover the forces that drove this rebirth in France.
Elisabeth Wolpert was born and educated in France. Her doctoral thesis dealt with 16th century French literature. She taught 30 years before coming to Virginia to take care of her grandson. She has enjoyed being a member of OLLI for the past two years.

 

 

R653  Physics in Your Life

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, June 18–July 9, July 23
Five sessions
Course facilitator: Abbie Edwards

Physics is the science that governs the working of physical reality at its most fundamental level. The common actions such as walking, breathing or driving a car are all based on the principles of physics. This Great Course series presented by Richard Wolfson, professor of physics at Middlebury College, will introduce us to the principles of physics as seen through their application to everyday life. We will explore two lectures per class of this 36-lecture series. The amazing disc (CDs and DVDs); what causes rainbows; mirages; taking flight; electricity; physics in the kitchen; and your place on Earth and in the universe are some of the topics that can be explored. There are many visuals and demonstrations in this lecture series, so come prepared to be enlightened about the advances of modern physics.
Abbie Edwards, an OLLI member, has taught a variety of classes at OLLI since 2001 including World Religions, Eastern Philosophies, Journey of Man and a History of Mythology and Evolution.

700 Current Events


R701  All the News That's Fit to Print

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, June 20–June 27, July 11, July 25
Four sessions
Instructor: Glenn Kamber

We live in an age of abundant information from TV, radio, the Internet, magazines, bumper stickers and newspapers. How should we filter these sources and evaluate information about world events, popular trends, and advances in science, business, sports and entertainment? In this discussion group we will look at some of the hot topics of the day. All viewpoints and opinions will be respected, needed and welcomed. As Walter Cronkite once said, “In a democracy agreement is not required, but participation is.”
Glenn Kamber, an OLLI member, is a retired executive from the Department of Health and Human Services. A trained marriage and family therapist, he is currently on the Fairfax–Falls Church Community Services Board.

 

800 Science, Technology & Health


F801  "Nana" Technology

Tuesday, 9:40–11:05, July 23
One session
Instructor: Andrew Carle

This session provides a review of aging populations and issues confronting both older adults and their families and professional caregivers in home and senior housing environments. The discussion includes the definition of “Nana” technology with current examples followed by examples of future sci-fi technologies to address health, safety, wellness and lifestyle needs. Learn why the iPad can make a difference in the lives of older adults and how robotic underwear may someday save your life.
The objectives of this session:
• Understand issues of national and worldwide aging populations and the need for new technologies to address these issues.
• Learn the definition and categories for “Nana” technology, and rationales and examples for each.
• Discuss the use and applications of currently available technologies for older adults.
• Review technologies in development for future application to address specific health, safety, wellness and resource allocation needs.
• Understand current utilization and national survey data reflecting older adults’ expectations and willingness to utilize technology in their daily lives.
Andrew Carle is an award-winning professor and founding director of the Program in Assisted Living/Senior Housing Administration at George Mason. In 2004 he coined the term “Nana” technology to define and categorize microchip-based technologies that can improve the quality of life for older adults. His work has been featured in national and international media and he serves as an adviser to numerous technology companies.

 

 

F802  Successful Aging Versus Realistic Aging

Wednesday, 11:50–1:15, July 24
One session
Instructor: Thomas Prohaska

How should the concept of successful aging be viewed in the context of realistic aging as an achievable health goal among older adults? The public views this as an argument for good health through practices that promote health. Others are concerned that their poor health is due to a variety of lifestyle choices (blaming the victim). What is realistic? Dean Prohaska will address
• how the concept of successful aging may contribute to overestimating maximum health benefits gained from a healthy lifestyle;
• distinctions between personal risk and population risk;
• successful aging and a more realistic optimal aging;
• the state of knowledge on the benefits for all major lifestyle behaviors such as exercise, diet and weight management;
• evidence on the importance of social interaction, education and cognitive engagement; and
• recommendations on how to determine the most successful strategies for obtaining optimal realistic health.   
Thomas R. Prohaska PhD is the dean of the College of Health and Human Services at George Mason. Prior to this, he was the co-director of the Center for Health and Aging at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has more than 35 years of research and service dedicated to improving the health and well-being of older adults. He has more than 100 journal publications, chapters and reports addressing public health and aging. He is also the lead editor of a recent book, Public Health for an Aging Society.  

 

F803  From Whence Cometh PCs?

Thursday, 9:40–11:05, July 25
One session
Instructor: Lorrin Garson

Where did the PCs we use today come from? Who were their ancestors? What does computer programming have to do with textiles? Who said, “I think there is a world market for maybe five computers”? What were the names of two pretty secretaries who had computers named after them? Which high-ranking naval officer coined the expression “computer bug”? Which well-known computer company first made its computer cases out of wood? How much did the first PC weigh? What connection does Bill Gates have with IBM? Who invented the mouse? Which computers produced by Apple were failures? Note: This presentation was made to the OLLI Computer Club on August 20, 2012, and subsequently revised and updated.
OLLI member Lorrin Garson is a chemist by profession; he has entranced many audiences with photos from all over the world and provided marvelous presentations to computer user groups for years. He's a regular columnist for the Potomac Area Technology and Computer Society POSTS newsletter.

 

F804  Chen-Style Tai Chi Beginner Class

Thursdays, 2:15–3:05, June 20, July 11–July 25
Four sessions
Note time
Instructor: Jerry Cheng
Class Limit: 20

Tai chi, a form of martial arts that has been practiced for centuries, is meditation in motion that emphasizes balance, posture and concentration. This beginning class will focus on chen-style tai chi, which promotes health and fitness, strengthens the immune system, can relieve neck and back pain, corrects digestive problems, aids emotional and psychological well-being, relieves stress and builds character. Please wear loose clothing and plan to work in stocking feet or soft, flexible shoes.
Jerry Cheng was born in China and started his martial arts training when he was six. He studied under several famous Chinese martial arts masters, including grandmaster Sha GuoZheng, and won four gold medals at the 1997 Atlanta International Martial Arts Championship. He taught tai chi at the University of Georgia for six years and the University of Texas for three years. Dr. Cheng received his PhD from the University of Georgia and his JD from the University of Texas. He currently practices law in Fairfax County.

 

 

R805  iPad Potpourri

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, June 18–July 9
Four sessions
Instructor: Stan Schretter

It seems like in a few brief years the tablet has become an indispensable part of our tools. They are popping up everywhere—in businesses, in schools and, of course, at OLLI. This course will provide a brief introduction to the many possibilities for using the iPad in our daily lives. Stan has recently used the iPad for OLLI class presentations and now finds it an indispensable part of traveling and showing photographs. Bring your iPad to class and follow along.
Stan Schretter, an OLLI member, is an avid amateur photographer and has taught courses at OLLI for many years.

 

 

L806  Staying Safe on Your Computer

Tuesday, 9:40–11:05, June 25
One session
Instructor: Mike Leavitt
Are you confident that when you are using your computer you have made yourself fairly secure and protected from those who would like to use your computer against you? Unfortunately in this age of the internet, the opportunities for bad guys to make your life online difficult are proliferating, and if you don’t keep up with the kinds of problems that are out there, you can become vulnerable. This course will present some very basic approaches to keeping your computer—and the information it contains and connects to—safe. The presentation will be at the most basic level, so even if you don’t feel very computer literate, you still will pick up a few basic tips.
Mike Leavitt has been involved with computer security since he was director of the computer center at the Brookings Institution in the 1970s. At the CIA, he ran several projects which involved enhancing the security of computer networks and mobile computer users. Since retiring, he has done some freelance writing in the area and has kept up with changes in the computer security environment. He has also taught OLLI courses on Jewish Studies and American immigration.

 

L807  iPad Basics

Wednesday, 9:40–11:05, June 19
One session
Instructor: Charlie Pryor

This session will look at the basic features of your iPad: controls, settings, home screen, multitasking, notifications and popular capabilities. Make sure that your iPad is charged and that you have updated to the latest version of the operating system (iOS). Additionally, you should know your Apple ID and password. Don’t have a tablet and thinking about buying one? Come anyway; this workshop might help you decide. Bring pen and paper for taking notes. You must have a George Mason ID number and an active George Mason email address before taking this class. They can be requested at any OLLI office and take approximately two weeks to obtain.
Charlie Pryor retired from the U.S. Army in 1988 and retired from his second career as a civil engineer in 2005. He has taught at the university level, at Army engineer schools and continuing education courses in his civilian job. He has used computers at work and at home since 1984.

L808  Energy Solutions: Here and Abroad

Wednesday, 9:40–11:05, July 17
One session
Instructor: Jim Wentworth

The November 2012 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Doha, Qatar, turned into a farce. In this time of worldwide economic crisis, burning fossil fuels helps industry, so climate change must wait. So much for the bad news. The good news is there are several technologies available that do not create greenhouse gases and several other technologies in the R&D stages. These technologies, along with more efficient use of energy, can reduce our dependence on oil and natural gas as sources of energy. Different governments have responded to climate change in different ways—from outright denial to developing farsighted strategies to adapt to climate change. Various current and future energy sources and potential areas where energy use can be reduced will be discussed along with their pros and cons.
Jim Wentworth retired from the Federal Highway Administration in 1999, after which he joined Edinburgh University in Scotland as a visiting professor of intelligent transportation systems. He has taught software engineering and served as a senior research scientist at the Center for Intelligent Systems Research at The George Washington University.

 

L809  Dental Implants for the General Public

Wednesday, 11:50–1:15, June 19
One session
Instructor: Richard Hughes

The goal of modern dentistry is to restore the patient to normal contour, function, comfort, esthetics, speech and health. Life expectancy has increased significantly past the age of retirement to 85 years in 2001 for a nonsmoking individual of normal weight. Social pressures, including dining and dating, continue throughout the later years. Seventy percent of the population in the United States are missing at least one tooth. Almost 30 percent of the 50-to-59-year olds in the United States exhibit one or more missing teeth. In consideration of these facts implant dentistry is answering the need of our aging population. The attendee will gain a knowledge and appreciation of the problems and the current solutions implant dentistry offers those suffering from the loss of teeth. The lecture will be supplemented by PowerPoint, video and models.
Richard Hughes DDS, with more than 22 years of experience in implant dentistry, is a national and international lecturer on topics about implant dentistry and is an implant surgical demonstrator and clinical investigator. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology/Implant Dentistry.

 

L810  Climate Change

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, July 3–July 24
Four sessions
Instructor: Robert Means

This course addresses three questions. First, what determines the Earth’s temperature? Astronomers are searching for planets within the habitable zone around other stars—the zone where the temperature is neither too hot nor too cold for life (as we know it). Why does the Earth itself fall within that zone? Second, why do most climate scientists believe human activity is making the Earth warmer? There are two approaches to answering this. One is to examine how humans are changing factors that determine the Earth’s temperature. The second is to measure changes in that temperature. The test of our understanding of Earth’s climate is the link between these approaches. Do the factors we believe determine the Earth’s temperature explain why it is warmer now than 200 years ago—and cooler than 50 million years ago? Third, and most important, what are the policy implications of global warming? What measures could slow or stop it or reduce the harm it causes? How much would those measures cost? How do we decide if that cost is justified?
Robert Means teaches courses in climate and energy policy at The Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland.

 

L811  "Nana" Technology

Tuesday, 9:40–11:05, July 23
One session
Videoconference from Tallwoood
Instructor: Andrew Carle

As part of a pilot program this session will use OLLI’s new videoconferencing equipment to share this class between campuses.  Your constructive feedback on the use of this technology will be requested.
This session provides a review of aging populations and issues confronting both older adults and their families and professional caregivers in home and senior housing environments. The discussion includes the definition of “Nana” technology with current examples followed by examples of future sci-fi technologies to address health, safety, wellness and lifestyle needs. Learn why the iPad can make a difference in the lives of older adults and how robotic underwear may someday save your life.
The objectives of this session:
• Understand issues of national and worldwide aging populations and the need for new technologies to address these issues.
• Learn the definition and categories for “Nana” technology, and rationales and examples for each.
• Discuss the use and applications of currently available technologies for older adults.
• Review technologies in development for future application to address specific health, safety, wellness and resource allocation needs.
• Understand current utilization and national survey data reflecting older adults’ expectations and willingness to utilize technology in their daily lives.
Andrew Carle
is an award-winning professor and founding director of the Program in Assisted Living/Senior Housing Administration at George Mason. In 2004 he coined the term “Nana” technology to define and categorize microchip-based technologies that can improve the quality of life for older adults. His work has been featured in national and international media and he serves as an adviser to numerous technology companies.

 

L812  Successful Aging Versus Realistic Aging

Wednesday, 11:50–1:15, July 24
One session
Videoconference from Tallwood
Instructor: Thomas Prohaska

As part of a pilot program this session will use OLLI’s new videoconferencing equipment to share this class between campuses.  Your constructive feedback on the use of this technology will be requested.
How should the concept of successful aging be viewed in the context of realistic aging as an achievable health goal among older adults? The public views this as an argument for good health through practices that promote health. Others are concerned that their poor health is due to a variety of lifestyle choices (blaming the victim). What is realistic? Dean Prohaska will address
• how the concept of successful aging may contribute to overestimating maximum health benefits gained from a healthy lifestyle;
• distinctions between personal risk and population risk;
• successful aging and a more realistic optimal aging;
• the state of knowledge on the benefits for all major lifestyle behaviors such as exercise, diet and weight management;
• evidence on the importance of social interaction, education and cognitive engagement; and
• recommendations on how to determine the most successful strategies for obtaining optimal realistic health.   
Thomas R. Prohaska PhD is the dean of the College of Health and Human Services at George Mason. Prior to this, he was the co-director of the Center for Health and Aging at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has more than 35 years of research and service dedicated to improving the health and well-being of older adults. He has more than 100 journal publications, chapters and reports addressing public health and aging. He is also the lead editor of a recent book, Public Health for an Aging Society.  

 

R653  Physics in Your Life

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, June 18–July 9, July 23
Five sessions
Course facilitator: Abbie Edwards

Note: please check the full description of this course listed under Humanities and Social Sciences.




900 Other Topics


F901  Following the Purple Crayon

Tuesday, 11:50–1:15, June 25
One session
Instructor: Debbie Halverson

Never too old for a journey into the future, like Harold with his purple crayon, we’ll explore what only our own crayons, figuratively, can design. Those of us who remember the children’s book Harold and the Purple Crayon know that the magic of this well-loved tale is in the wonder of Harold’s creativity as he draws his story with his handy-dandy purple crayon. Each of us in this discussion class can look at what we can open up in our world with that same spirit of joyful discovery that carried Harold through his adventures and then back home again. You don’t need to be an artist to enjoy this class—just use a playful imagination.

Over the years, because of many changes that occurred in her life, long-time OLLI member Debbie Halverson has had to reinvent her life and lifestyle in creative ways—but always moving forward. This class speaks to her desire to share her view that life is an ever-spiraling upward experience, offering opportunities for good stuff as yet unseen

 

 

F902  Summer Soups and Salads

Wednesday, 11:50–1:15, June 19
One session
Instructor: Debbie Halverson
Class limit: 12

Warm weather points us to cool meals and what better than a nice chilled soup added to a fresh, crisp salad to round out a satisfying meal? Each of the three one-session courses will include a cold vegetable or fruit soup. For the salad part, we’ll ask OLLI members to send the instructor their favorite summer salad recipes and from those submitted, we’ll choose what best complements the soup of the day. (Watch your E-News for submission procedure.) Sign up for each class separately to fit your always-busy summer schedule. $5.00 food fee payable to OLLI at the time of registration.
Debbie Halverson is pleased to report that the cooking curriculum seems to have found a secure place in the OLLI program and that the cooking classes are learning experiences in keeping with OLLI’s mission. The classes are also opportunities to add to our creative skills and further Debbie’s desire to show seniors how to make their meal planning more interesting and appealing.

 

 

F903  Summer Soups and Salads

Wednesday, 11:50–1:15, June 26
One session
Instructor: Debbie Halverson
Class limit: 12

Warm weather points us to cool meals and what better than a nice chilled soup added to a fresh, crisp salad to round out a satisfying meal? Each of the three one-session courses will include a cold vegetable or fruit soup. For the salad part, we’ll ask OLLI members to send the instructor their favorite summer salad recipes and from those submitted, we’ll choose what best complements the soup of the day. (Watch your E-News for submission procedure.) Sign up for each class separately to fit your always-busy summer schedule. $5.00 food fee payable to OLLI at the time of registration.
Debbie Halverson is pleased to report that the cooking curriculum seems to have found a secure place in the OLLI program and that the cooking classes are learning experiences in keeping with OLLI’s mission. The classes are also opportunities to add to our creative skills and further Debbie’s desire to show seniors how to make their meal planning more interesting and appealing.

 

 

F904  Summer Soups and Salads

Wednesday, 11:50–1:15, July 3
One session
Instructor: Debbie Halverson
Class limit: 12

Warm weather points us to cool meals and what better than a nice chilled soup added to a fresh, crisp salad to round out a satisfying meal? Each of the three one-session courses will include a cold vegetable or fruit soup. For the salad part, we’ll ask OLLI members to send the instructor their favorite summer salad recipes and from those submitted, we’ll choose what best complements the soup of the day. (Watch your E-News for submission procedure.) Sign up for each class separately to fit your always-busy summer schedule. $5.00 food fee payable to OLLI at the time of registration.
Debbie Halverson is pleased to report that the cooking curriculum seems to have found a secure place in the OLLI program and that the cooking classes are learning experiences in keeping with OLLI’s mission. The classes are also opportunities to add to our creative skills and further Debbie’s desire to show seniors how to make their meal planning more interesting and appealing.

 

 

F905  Losing Marmee: A Mother, A Daughter, and Six Years in Assisted Living

Thursday, 11:50–1:15, July 25
One session
Coordinator: Florence Adler

During the years of her mother’s decline, OLLI member Martha Powers learned so many lessons that she was amazed no one had written a book about them. So she wrote it! Losing Marmee is a memoir with a purpose: to give caregivers a sneak preview of the day-to-day surprises that may come their way, even under the best of circumstances. For example:
• What can happen if you don’t take the car keys away from Dad?
• Is there more than one way to exit hospice?
• Can you identify symptoms of a T.I.A. (mini-stroke)?
• Would you recognize signs of elder abuse?
• What should you NOT do if someone has a seizure?
Losing Marmee is chock-full of lighter moments as well. Marmee’s indomitable spirit (“Once a Marine, always a Marine”) and her unfailing sense of humor inspired all who knew her, and her story lives on. This event will begin with brief readings, followed by plenty of time for Q&A and open discussion.



 

R906  Trip Tales

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, June 20–June 27, July 11, July 25
Four sessions
Coordinator: Stan Schretter

This summer we will again visit wonderful places of the world while sitting in our chairs. We will travel from the Americas to Europe and Asia without leaving Reston. Please note the class dates, since the four sessions must be split up during the six-week summer session.



 

 

L907  OLLI Program Development Workshop

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, July 16-July 23
Two sessions
Moderator: Ray Beery

This is an invitation for you, the OLLI member who just joined or who has been here for many terms, to pay back a little. We will brainstorm, examine best practices from other OLLIs and actually shape up some of the planning for courses in the upcoming winter and spring terms. Your life experience and willingness to ply your network of friends and colleagues will give us a true boost.
Ray Beery was the second OLLI (then LRI) program chairman in 1995. He served as program adviser at the Loudoun campus from 2007–2012, when he rejoined the Board of Directors. He recently taught International Relations and will teach France–U.S. History in the fall.



 

Special Events


951  A Visit to the Newseum: The Interactive Museum of News

Bus Trip
Monday, June 24, 9:00–3:00
Coordinators: Norm and Lorraine Rosenberg
703-361-4572
Event limit: 54

The Newseum—a 250,000 square-foot museum of news—offers five centuries of news history blended with up-to-the-second technology and hands-on exhibits. Seen from the front, the large stone tablet affixed to the Newseum building on Pennsylvania Avenue looks like a piece of newsprint. It is 74 feet high, emblazoned with the words of the First Amendment. The Newseum celebrates the history of journalism and, by extension, the First Amendment freedoms upon which journalism is predicated. The Newseum features 14 galleries, 15 theaters, retail spaces and visitor services. There are no docent-led tours; the self-guided experience allows you to spend as much time as you wish at various exhibits. Lunch will be self-service dining in the building’s food court, the Food Section. The menu includes a selection of hot entrees, grilled and cold sandwiches, salads, snacks and desserts. No outside food and beverages are allowed. The bus will leave promptly at 9:00 from Fair Oaks Mall, parking lot no. 44, outside the circular road across from the Macy’s closest to Sears. Please be on the bus no later than 8:45. The fee of $37, payable to OLLI with your registration, includes admission to the Newseum, bus fare and driver gratuity.

 

 

952  An Overnight Visit to Staunton and the Blackfriars Playhouse
            (Single Occupancy)

Saturday–Sunday, June 29–30
Carpool
Coordinators: Lorraine and Norm Rosenberg
703-361-4572

Nestled in the Shenandoah Valley, Staunton’s historic downtown delights visitors with its vibrant arts scene and great restaurants. Our overnight stay will be at the Stonewall Jackson Hotel and Conference Center, located in the historic district, within walking distance of a myriad of interesting galleries, fine antique stores, artisan shops, the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library and Museum and the American Shakespeare Center’s Blackfriars Playhouse, a re-creation of Elizabethan London’s most famous theater. Our package includes overnight accommodations, breakfast served in the hotel’s 24 Market Room, overnight parking and tickets to two performances at the Blackfriars Playhouse: Romeo and Juliet on Saturday night and Return to the Forbidden Planet, a rollicking musical loosely based on The Tempest, on Sunday afternoon. All other meals will be on your own. The single-occupancy package costs $215 inclusive of tax and service fees, payable to OLLI at the time of registration.

 

 

953  An Overnight Visit to Staunton and the Blackfriars Playhouse
            (Double Occupancy)

Saturday-Sunday, June 29-30
Carpool
Coordinator: Loraine and Norm Rosenbnerg
703-361-4572

The package for double occupancy offers the same features as 952. If you choose to sign up for this package, please coordinate travel with your roommate in advance. Both roommates must notify the office by emailing olli@gmu.edu. The double occupancy package costs $147 per person inclusive of tax and service fees, payable to OLLI at the time of registration.

 

 

954  Lunch at the Sea Pearl Restaurant

Monday, July 1, 1:30
Carpool
Coordinator: Bill Reader
Event limit: 30

If you like excellent seafood, the Sea Pearl restaurant is the place for you. Chef Liao has created some great dishes. The restaurant is located in the Merrifield Town Center on Gallows Road between Lee Highway and Route 50 (across the street from the Silver Diner) with plenty of free parking in the rear of the building. For our three-course lunch, we will have a choice of appetizers, an entrée accompanied by roasted potatoes and seasonal vegetables and a dessert from a special menu. The price of $56 per person, payable to OLLI at the time of your registration, includes coffee or tea and the delicious house-baked bread. We will dine in a curtained-off area with tables arranged to seat six to eight people. Menu selections and directions will be sent to you after your registration is confirmed.

 

955  A Visit to the Marine Corps Museum

Monday, July 8, 8:30–2:30
Bus Trip
Coordinator: Mary Coyne
Event limit: 54

The National Museum of the Marine Corps is a lasting tribute to the past, present and future of the Corps. Adjacent to the Marine base at Quantico, the museum exhibits irreplaceable artifacts and uses the latest in technology to immerse you in the sights and sounds of Marines in action. There are two venues located within the museum to purchase lunch. Admission to the museum is free. Price for the trip including the bus fare and driver gratuity is $20 payable to OLLI at the time of registration. The bus will pick up from both the Loudoun campus and Fair Oaks Mall. If boarding in Loudoun, please be on the bus at 8:15; the bus will leave promptly at 8:30, driving to Fair Oaks Mall. We will pick up passengers there at parking lot no. 44, outside the circular road across from the Macy’s closest to Sears, departing at 9:00. If you are boarding the bus at Fair Oaks Mall, please arrive at parking lot no. 44 by 8:45. We will return to Fair Oaks at approximately 2:00 and to the Loudoun campus at 2:30.

 

 

956  The Supreme Court

Friday, July 12, 10:00–3:00
Bus Trip
Coordinator: Ben Gold                                                               703-860-8798
Event limit: 50

We will visit the Supreme Court, the most powerful and prestigious judicial institution in the world, attend a lecture in the courtroom, view an interesting short film of interviews with the current sitting justices and tour some areas of the building not seen by the general public. Lunch will be on your own in the Supreme Court cafeteria. The bus will leave promptly at 10:00 from Fair Oaks Mall parking lot no. 44, outside the circular road near the Macy’s closest to Sears. Please be at the bus no later than 9:45. The fee of $19, payable to OLLI with your registration form, covers the cost of the bus fare and driver gratuity. Please note: there will be a two- to three-block walk to the Court from the bus discharge point. Also, if you have taken the tour before, please do not sign up again—give others a chance to take this popular trip.

 

 

957  Tour of the National Building Museum

Monday, July 15, 9:00–3:30
Bus Trip
Coordinator: Mary Coyne
Event limit: 50

This historic building was inspired by two Roman palaces and houses some of the largest Corinthian columns in the world. We will have two docent-led tours. The first is of the building itself including the fourth floor which is not open to the general public. The second tour is of the special exhibition: Palaces for the People: Guastavino and America’s Great Public Spaces. Rafael Guastavino Sr. was probably the most influential architectural craftsman of late 19th and early 20th century America. He created beautifully crafted, structurally strong, arched vaults inside the Boston Public Library, and the tiles used in Grand Central Station, the Riverside Church in Manhattan, and the rebuilt dome of Jefferson’s Rotunda at UVA. There is a cafe in the building and several restaurants within a three-block area for lunch on your own. Cost, including entry fee, two tours, bus fare and driver gratuity, will be $28 payable to OLLI at the time of registration. The bus will leave promptly at 9:00 from Fair Oaks Mall parking lot no. 44, outside the circular road across from the Macy’s closest to Sears. Please be on the bus no later than 8:45. We will return at approximately 3:30.

 

 

958  Tour of NGA Exhibit: When Art Danced with Music

Friday, July 19, 9:30–3:30
Bus Trip
Coordinator: Ann Youngren                           703-437-1150
Event limit: 30 
  
Join us for a visit to the National Gallery of Art to see an unforgettable exhibition from the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, 1909–1929: When Art Danced with Music. The exhibit showcases groundbreaking collaborations by Ballets Russes, the most innovative dance company of the 20th century, with artists Picasso, Matisse and de Chirico, composers Stravinsky, Prokofiev and Satie, and dancers Nijinsky and Balanchine, among many others. There are costumes, set designs, paintings, photographs and film clips. We will enjoy a docent guided tour and lunch on our own at the National Gallery. Cost for bus fare and driver gratuity will be $40 payable to OLLI at the time of registration. The bus will leave promptly at 9:30 from Fair Oaks Mall parking lot no. 44, outside the circular road across from the Macy’s closest to Sears. Please be on the bus no later than 9:15. We will return at approximately 3:30.

 

959  A Opera at Castleton: Otello

Sunday, July 28, 11:15–6:15
Bus Trip
Coordinator: Mary Coyne
Event limit: 30

The Castleton Festival was launched in 2009 by the famous conductor Lorin Maazel and his wife on their beautiful estate near Culpeper. It is now one of the leading international festivals featuring outstanding young singers and brilliant stage productions. We will attend the performance of Giuseppe Verdi’s Otello, based on the Shakespearean play Othello, in the 600-seat theatre. A light lunch may be purchased or you may bring your own. There are pleasant areas where you can sit and relax. Price, including tickets, bus and driver gratuity, is $70 payable to OLLI at the time of registration. The bus will leave promptly at 11:15 from Fair Oaks Mall parking lot no. 44, outside the circular road across from the Macy’s closest to Sears. Please be on the bus by 11:00. We will return at approximately 6:15.

 


Ongoing Activities


Book Club

Wednesday, June 12, 10:00-11:30

Monday, July 8, 10:00-11:3000–11:30

Wednesday, Sept. 11, 10:00-11:30

Tallwood

Coordinator: Ceda McGrew                            703-323-9671

On June 12 we plan to discuss Cleopatra by Stacy Schiff.. The July 8 selection will be Harry Truman"s Excellent Adventure by Matthew Algeo, followed on September 11 by The Presidents Club by Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy. All OLLI members are welcome.

 

Bridge Club

Mondays, June 3-July 29, Aug. 19-Aug. 26, 10:00-12:00

Tallwood

Coordinators: Susanne Zumbro                     703-569-2750

                             Gordon Canyock                     703-425-4607

Drop in and enjoy the friendly atmosphere of “party bridge.” Skill levels vary from advanced beginner to aspiring expert. Partnerships are rotated every four hands.

 

Classic Fiction Book Club

Fourth Fridays

May 24, June 28, July 26, Aug. 23, 10:00–11:30

Loudoun, Room 205

Coordinator:  Sigrid Blalock                            703-723-6825

The book selection for May 24 is A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes, and the book selection for June 28 is H.M. Pulham, Esquire by John Marquand. On July 26 the group will discuss Memento Mori by Muriel Spark. On August 23 the book selection is Point Counter Point by Aldous Huxley. The Classic Fiction Book Club welcomes new members.

 

Cooking Club

Monthly dates to be determined

Tallwood

Coordinator: Debbie Halverson

This is a club for OLLI members who enjoy preparing food and sharing hands-on, homemade dishes in a small-group setting during the day, sometimes in members’ homes and other times at Tallwood or alternative sites. We often have a theme for our meetings, but our format is flexible. We also participate in other food-related events, such as ethnic cooking demonstrations, restaurant outings and grocery store presentations. If these activities appeal to you, please contact Debbie at debbyhalv@aol.com for more information. All OLLI members are welcome.

 

Craft and Conversation Group

Weekly

Day/time to be determined

Tallwood

Coordinators: Doris Bloch                           703-591-3344

                            Pam Cooper-Smuzynski              703-455-2716

The meeting schedule is flexible but we plan to meet weekly to work on our craft projects and to share product sources, expertise and inspiration. The date, time and place of our meetings can be found in the OLLI Ongoing Events Calendar for the week. We cordially invite any interested OLLI members to drop in and see what we are creating. For further information, contact Doris Bloch at dbloch50@hotmail.com or Pam Cooper-Smuzynski at pamcs2@verizon.net.

 

Gourmet Club

Events as scheduled

Coordinator: Eric Henderson

This club is for those who enjoy fine dining and appreciate subtle differences in flavor or quality. Its purpose is to plan and arrange gourmet luncheons in selected restaurants. If gourmet dining appeals to you, contact Eric Henderson at ericcarol@mac.com for additional information.

 

History Club

First Wednesdays 

Tallwood

Coordinator: Bob Persell                                 703-941-9349

This club does not meet during the summer. The next meeting will be October 2. The club welcomes OLLI members who are interested in discussing historical events and sharing reviews of articles, books or interesting topics. The club maintains a list of books that members have found worthwhile. If you would like to receive email notification of upcoming History Club meetings, contact bpersell@bellatlantic.net.

 

Homer, etc.

Fridays

May 17-Aug. 2, Aug. 23-Sept. 13, 11:00-12:30

Tallwood

Coordinator: Jan Bohall                                 703–273–1146

We get together to read and talk about traditional and contemporary classics. We’ve recently read the first volume of Sigrid Undset’s trilogy, Kristin Lavransdatter: The Wreath, and are now reading the second, The Wife, in a new translation. Drop in at the Tallwood Annex any Friday morning—new members are always welcome. For more information email the coordinator at jbohall@verizon.net.

 

Knitting and Needlework Club

Tuesdays

May 14-Sept. 10, 10:00

Reston

Coordinator: Sheila Gold                                 703-860-8798

Do you love to knit, crochet or needlepoint? Do you want to learn? We welcome both beginners and more advanced needle workers. There is always someone who is happy to teach the new student. Come and join us on Tuesday mornings at the Lake Anne Coffee Shop in Reston. For more information please contact Sheila at sheila.gold@verizon.net.

 

Mah Jongg Club

First and Third Mondays

June 3, June 17, July 1, July 15, Aug. 19, 10:00

Tallwood

Coordinator: Liz Bateman

We welcome all members who want to learn the game of Mah Jongg, or already know how to play. Stretch your mind and have fun with a game that is (maybe) easier than bridge, but definitely challenging! For more contact information, contact Liz at concordiaeb@verizon.net.

 

Memoir Writing Group

Weekly

Tallwood

Coordinator: Betty Smith

The Memoir Writing Group meets, usually on Wednesdays, except during the fall and spring terms when the Memoir Writing Class is in session. We bring copies of our writing to each meeting and gently discuss each other’s work. We’re a small group, mostly students from Dianne Hennessy King’s Memoir Writing class. If you’re interested, please e-mail Betty at bsmith5000@verizon.net.

 

Personal Computer User Group

Third Saturdays

May 18, June 15, July 20, Aug. 17, 1:00-3:30

Tallwood

Coordinator: Paul Howard                   phoward@gmu.edu

We focus on Windows® computers, tablets, handheld devices, digital photography, related technology, Linux and Android operating systems and Open Source software, in partnership with PATACS (Potomac Area Technology and Computer Society). Our aim is to bring broad subject matter expertise to both groups. Our target audience encompasses beginners to intermediate amateurs and our methodology is “users helping users.” Club dues of $5 are payable at the first meeting attended in each calendar year. More details are available on the group’s website, www.olligmu.org/~opcug.

 

Photography Club

Second Fridays

June 14, July 12, 9:30-11:30

Tallwood

Coordinator: Ed Parker                                    703-455-5340

Meet with others interested in photography. Develop skills by participating in the monthly theme photo submissions. Be informed, and perhaps inspired, by expert speakers. The Photography Club welcomes all members, whether they use a basic camera or specialized equipment and whether or not they are new to photography or have had years of experience. We discuss technical aspects of photography as well as the artistic aspects of visual design. Contact Ed at parkcom1874@verizon.net for further information.

 

Recorder Consort

Fridays

May 17-Aug.2, Aug. 23-Sept. 13, 9:00-11:30

Tallwood

Coordinator: Kathy Wilson                             703-635-8738

If you have been a part of the Consort or have previously played the recorder and would like to expand your abilities, join us on Fridays. There will be some on- and off-campus performances and music may need to be purchased. If you are interested in learning to play the recorder, contact Kathy.

 

The Tom Crooker Investment Forum

Wednesdays     

May 15-June 5, July 31, Aug. 21-Sept. 11, 10:30-12:00

Tallwood

Moderator: Al Smuzynski

See course F205 for activity description.

 

Travel Club

Fourth Fridays

June 28, July 26, 9:30

Tallwood

Coordinator: Shelly Gersten                           703-385-2638

The club welcomes any and all who are interested in domestic or international travel. OLLI members have a vast wealth of experience in both traveling and living in other parts of the United States and the world. Come share your experiences and learn from others. We also try to find common interests so that members can plan to travel together. In addition, we plan trips where we carpool to a variety of sites in the area (within a 60-90 minute drive). These include historic homes, museums, etc.

 

Walking Group

Weekly

Tallwood/Pool Parking Lot

Coordinators: Doris Bloch                      703-591-3344

                            Sherry Hart                               703-978-0848

When OLLI is in session, the Walking Group at Tallwood meets one morning a week, generally an hour before the first morning class. We gather in the pool parking lot and walk for about 45 minutes, arriving back at Tallwood in time for the start of classes. All levels of walking ability and speed are accommodated—our goal is camaraderie as well as exercise. We set the day of the week for our walks during the first week of the term, based on which day is most convenient for the majority of participants. Between terms we continue to walk on a weekly basis, but for longer distances and at more varied locations. Contact Sherry Hart at harts66@hotmail.com or Doris Bloch at dbloch50@hotmail.com for more information.

 

What’s in the Daily News? Continued

Mondays

May 13-May 20, June 3-July 29, Aug. 19-Sept. 9,   10:00–11:30

Tallwood

Facilitator: Don Allen                                       703-830-3060

This is a continuation of What’s in the Daily News? for news junkies who can’t wait for the next term to express their opinions and discuss current events. It’s a small group and the facilitator expects it to be self-moderating.