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Spring 2016 Catalog

Fall 2016 Catalog
September 19  – November 11

Below is a list of the courses, special events and ongoing fall 2016 activities at all three locations (Fairfax, Reston and Loudoun). Unless otherwise noted, classes beginning with an F are held at Tallwood in Fairfax, an R at United Christian Parish in Reston, and an L at Mason’s Loudoun County location in Sterling. To view non-course information in the catalog, click the following links for the Schedule of classes (pdf) and Registration Form (pdf). If there is an instructor for a course that interests you, please check our page of instructor profiles.

If you plan to print the catalog rather than read it on your computer screen, you may prefer to print the Fall 2016 Catalog (pdf) in its normal two-column format.

Class hours are 9:40–11:05, 11:50–1:15, and 2:15–3:40, unless otherwise noted.

100 Art and Music

F101 Let’s Turn It Into a Musical: A Celebration of What Makes Musicals Special
F102 Understanding Opera, Part 1
F103 Introduction to Sketching and Watercolor Art
F104 Music Sampler
F105 Drawing and Sketching Workshop
F106 Seeing Like Your Camera Part 2
F107 Singing for Fun
F108 Watercolor Painting
R109 The Ongoing Pleasures of Music
R110 Metropolitan Europe in the 19th and 20th Centuries
R111 Public Art Films
R112 Women Artists
R113 Al Jolson: The World’s Greatest Entertainer
R114 Meet the Artists
L115 Beginning Sketching in Loudoun
L116 Art History Connections Part 2
L117 The Making of Impressionism

200 Economics & Finance

F201 The Great Game: Make Money While You Sleep (or Eat, Pray, Love?)
F202 The Tom Crooker Investment Forum
F203 An Economics Potpourri

300 History; International Studies

F301 The Frontiersmen
F302 The Rockefeller Giants
F303 More Tales from the Back Stairs
F304 Explosive Exposés from Watergate to Snowden
F305 The Elections of Our Youth: Theodore White and The Making of the President Series
F306 Journalism and Politics in Modern America
F307 Civil War Potpourri
F308 The Silk Road: The Gobi Desert and Beyond
F309 1787-1789: A New Government and Three Presidents
R310 Coastal Potpourri and Legends
R311 History of Immigration in the United States
R312 Irish History: Fintan the Wise to Fianna Fáil
R313 Rangers’ Choice: A Different Topic Every Week!
R314 A New Look at the Old Dominion
R315 History of the Supreme Court
R316 Impact of Television on Elections
L317 The Black Death
L318 Engineers of Victory: Problem Solvers Who Turned the Tide in the Second World War
L319 Légion Étrangère d’Français: Then and Now
L320 Zelikow’s Take on the 20th Century, Part 4
L321 The Elections of Our Youth: Theodore White and The Making of the President Series
L322 America’s Civil War Up Close and Personal

400 Literature, Theater & Writing

F401 Shadow Divers: Solving the Mystery of “U-Who”
F402 OLLI Players Workshop
F403 Readers’ Theater
F404 Memoir Writing
F405 A Novel for All Seasons: Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea
F406 Poetry Workshop
F407 The Literary Landscape
F408 Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones
F409 An Acting Workshop for the Serious Actor
F410 Meet the Authors
F411 HaikuFun, Understanding, and Maybe Some Satori
F412 It Ain’t for Sissies: Movies about Aging
R413 The Strangeness of Edgar Allan Poe
R414 Two by Virginia Woolf
R415 What is a Documentary?
R416 Literary Roundtable
R417 So You Wanna Write Poetry, but Don’t Think You Can
R418 The Literary Landscape
L419 The New Yorker Round Table
L420 The Sonnets of William Shakespeare
L421 Movie Matinees
L422 Writer’s Workshop

500 Languages

F501 Spanish Conversation, Intermediate II
F502 Italian for Travelers
F503 Spanish Conversational Forum
F504 Beginning French
F505 Latin II
R506 Intermediate Spanish Conversation, Part 3
R507 French Conversation

600 Religious Studies

F601 Survey of Non-Traditional Beliefs
F602 Jesus’ Final Week and the Beginnings of Christianity
F603 The Theology of Les Miserables
F604 Religion in American History
F605 Women of the Bible: Saints, Vamps and Vixens
R606 Catholic Social Thought in the Modern Era
L607 The Jesus of History
L608 Introduction to Rabbinic Judaism
L609 Religion in American History

650 Humanities and Social Sciences

F651 Cultures and Religions of East Asia
F652 Spinoza’s Ethics
F653 The Dust Bowl
F654 Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle
F655 The Mind-Body Problem in Modern and Contemporary Philosophy
F656 Contemporary Issues in Criminology
F657 Enhancing Your Well-Being
R658 All about Marriage
L659 The 7 C’S of Communication
L660 Contemporary Issues in Criminology
L661 Genocide and Genocide Denial in American History

700 Current Events

F701 What’s in the Daily News?
F702 Great Decisions
R703 All the News That’s Fit to Print
L704 Korea: North and South
L705 Introduction to the U.S. Agency for International Development

800 Science, Technology & Health

F801 Pulsars: An Adventure to Explore the Wonders of the Star
F802 Changing Behavior: Tips, Tricks, and Techniques
F803 Memory Errors
F804 Medical Updates from the Health Professionals at Inova Fair Oaks Hospital
F805 United States Forests and Climate Change
F806 Beginner Chen-Style Tai Chi
R807 Mobile App Potpourri
R808 Demystifying Dementia
R809 Gentle Yoga
R810 Tai Chi Chuan, Eight Ways (55 years and older)
R811 What’s Hot and What’s Not? An Update of the Chernobyl and Fukushima Nuclear Reactor Accidents
L812 Memory Errors
L813 Navigating Your Ocean of Emotion: Feeling Better from the Inside Out
L814 3D Printing: Why All the Hype?

900 Other Topics

F901 Adventure Beckons! The Path to Your New Mental, Spiritual, and Fitness Future
F902 Finding Our Way: A Workshop on Self Re-Discovery
F903 Trip Tales
F904 One Man’s Journey as a Caregiver
F905 Gotta Sing, Gotta Dance, Gotta Style: Seniors Who Rock!

Fall for the Book

951 Fall for the Book: Edith Maxwell, Mystery, Loudoun County
952 Fall for the Book: Diane Rehm
953 Fall for the Book: Timothy Jorgensen, Strange Glow: The Story of Radiation
954 Fall for the Book: Kate Andersen Brower, First Women: The Grace and Power of America’s Modern First Ladies
955 Fall for the Book: James McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom
956 Fall for the Book: Claudia Kalb, Andy Warhol was a Hoarder
957 Fall for the Book: Billy Collins
958 Fall for the Book: Donna Gunn, Discoveries from the Fortepiano

Additional Special Events

959 Status of Fear in the United States
960 Status of Fear in the United States
961 The 2030 Roadmap: Greater Washington’s Economic Future
962 Caregiving Wisdom from an Ancient Sage
963 Understanding the Nuts and Bolts of the Election Process in Virginia
964 Cuba: A Land in Transition
965 Gilbert and Sullivan, Part 3
966 Come Rain or Come Shine: The Music of Harold Arlen
967 Overcoming Mental Barriers to Realize Your Full Potential
968 Music in the Life of President Lincoln
969 Alexander Gardner: An Examination of his Photographic Legacy
970 Rise and Fall of Senator Joe McCarthy
971 You Come Too: My Journey with Robert Frosta>
972 Search like a Librarian: Introduction to Research Resources
973 America’s Atlas: The Leadership of George Washington
974 The State of the Arts: Insights into the University, Community, and Beyond
975 A Marvelous Party: The Music of Noel Coward and Cole Porter
976 The Difficulty of Being Good
977 Hamilton: The Man and the Musical
978 The Role of Religious Communities in Disaster Recovery
979 The Importance of Trees and Forests in Fairfax County
980 First-Hand Experience Meeting and Working with Syrian Refugees
981 Commedia dell’ Politico
982 The Power of Books for Children, From Babies to Teens
983 OLLI’s Second Annual Veterans Day Celebration
984 The 2016 Presidential Election: Forces and Consequences
985 The Libraries at Mason: Yesterday and Today
986 State Fair of Virginia: Bus Trip
987 Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Tour with Lunch
988 A Wine Trip in the Fauquier County Countryside
989 The Threepenny Opera
990 Brothers at Arms: American Independence and the Men of France and Spain who Saved It
991 Iran and Iranian Peoples: Mithraism 
992 Beyond Sacred: Voices of Muslim Identity
1001BT They Call Me Mr. (or Ms.) Liaison!
1002BT Grab ‘n’ Gab Coffee Klatch
1003BT AARP Smart Driver Class
1004BT Bake Sale, Lunch, and a Movie: Joyeux Noël (“Merry Christmas”),
1005BT 9/ll Day of Service Project with George Mason University
1101 New Member Coffee
1102 Grab ‘n’ Gab Coffee Klatch
1103 Oktober-Chili-Fest
1104 OLLI’s BIG 25th Anniversary Party
1105 Annual OLLI Holiday Party

Ongoing Activities

Annex Art Club
Bridge Club
Classic Literature Club
Cooking Club
Craft and Conversation Group
Dr. Who Club
History Club
Homer, etc.
Mah Jongg Club
Memoir-and More-Writing Group
Personal Computer User Group
Photography Club
Recorder Consort
Religious Studies Club (new)
Reston Book Club
Spanish Club (new)
Tai Chi Club
Tallwood Book Club
Theater Lovers’ Club
The Tom Crooker Investment Forum
Walking Group
What’s in the Daily News? Continued

100 Art and Music

 

F101 Let’s Turn It Into a Musical: A Celebration of What Makes Musicals Special

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Nov. 7–Nov. 14
Two sessions
Instructor: Barry Bortnick

It seems just about anything—from Shakespeare to Gypsy Rose Lee’s memoirs to the signing of the Declaration of Independence to, most recently, the rise (and fall) of our first Secretary of the Treasury—has become the material for a musical. This new short course, richly illuminated with audio and visual clips, looks at examples that provide a window into the wonderfully rich process that has made that happen. We’ll review the places creators have turned to for material, the creative challenges and choices they faced, and the transformations they wrought that gave us that unique combination of song, dance, story, and stagecraft that makes musical theatre an experience so many treasure. Looking at legends like West Side Story and Gypsy, and shows in the process of becoming legends, as well as at lesser known delights, the course is a broad, affectionate portrait of musicals in their fascinating variety, and an exploration of what makes this uniquely American contribution to world culture so special.
Barry Bortnick, PhD, is a composer, lyricist, and book writer of musicals performed on both coasts and in London. He is the former program director, humanities, UCLA Extension and founding director of the UCLA OLLI. He received his PhD from Harvard University, where he did research on creativity and the development of interest in the arts. He has taught courses on the American musical at various OLLI’s around the country.

 

F102 Understanding Opera, Part 1

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 21–Oct. 12
Four sessions
Instructor: Glenn Winters

This class is designed to prepare students to fully enjoy the first two productions of Virginia Opera’s 2016-2017 season. Productions covered are The Seven Deadly Sins, a one-act drama combining song and dance by Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht; Leoncavallo’s classic tragedy Pagliacci; and Rossini’s immortal comedy The Barber of Seville. Musical and dramatic analysis is illustrated with audio and video excerpts. The course is recommended for beginners and aficionados alike.
Dr. Glenn Winters has been Virginia Opera’s community outreach musical director since 2004. His adult education program, “Operation Opera,” reaches thousands of Virginians each season at numerous Lifelong Learning Institutes around the state. Winters’ book, The Opera Zoo: Singers, Composers and Other Primates, is available from Kendall Hunt Publishing. Winters is a composer as well, and his commissioned operas include works for adults and children alike.

 

 

F103 Introduction to Sketching and Watercolor Art

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 19–Nov. 7
Instructors: Suzanne Goldstein, Susann Hamilton
Class limit: 12

This class is for beginners who want to learn some basic skills in sketching and watercolor art. We will discuss pencil types, pastels, charcoal and papers used to produce lines, shapes and textures in perspective, as well as appropriate brushes, paints, and paper for watercolor painting. Artwork may have to be finished outside of class. Participants will be emailed a supply list.
Suzanne Goldstein is a retired math teacher and alongtime attendee of OLLI sketching and watercolor classes and facilitator of the Annex Art Club.
Susann Hamilton is a retired association executive who previously was an OLLI instructor of “Beginning Sketching.”

 

F104 Music Sampler

Tuesdays, 9:30–10:55, Sept. 20–Nov. 8
Note time
Fairfax Lord of Life
Coordinator: Kathryn Hearden

Kathryn Hearden from the George Mason University School of Music will coordinate this course highlighting examples of the musical talent that abounds at Mason. Each week knowledgeable and enthusiastic professors from the Mason School of Music, often accompanied by their most promising students, will generously share their musical gifts in presentations that are varied, lively, informative, and entertaining.

 

F105 Drawing and Sketching Workshop

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 20–Nov. 8
Fairfax Lord of Life
Instructor: Bill Parsons
Class limit: 14

Students with drawing experience will explore different drawing techniques, materials, and ideas. Projects will challenge students to more completely see the effects of light, dimension, scale, perspective, form, and composition, while drawing objects from life and from photographs. Students will be encouraged to exercise free expression and creativity, applying their own personal interests to produce work that is uniquely theirs, and using whatever medium suits their drawings. Projects will be started in class but usually finished outside of class. Weekly class discussions of finished work will help students further develop their talents. A basic drawing kit of pencils, charcoal, Conté crayons, ink pens, pastels and paper appropriate to the medium will get us started.
Bill Parsons retired in 2012 from a 35-year career that began by teaching art to American soldiers and their families in Germany. He earned an MFA from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1978 and has worked as a furniture maker and designer, jeweler, silversmith, and ceramic artist.

 

F106 Seeing Like Your Camera, Part 2

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Instructor: Stan Schretter
This class is a follow-on to Part 1 in Reston during the summer term. The major topics addressed during this class include:

● Learning to see like your camera lens;
● Understanding and seeing the light, e.g. color, intensity, dynamic range, backlight, and histograms;
● Making your images come to life, such as recognizing and removing image complexity, visualizing your composition, moving your eye through the picture space, and adding mystery to your images.
This class will use videos from Lynda.com as part of the instruction and homework. In order to access these videos for free you MUST have a Mason G number and an active Mason email address before taking the class. They can be requested at any OLLI office and will take approximately three weeks to obtain. Please do this early so as to not miss important material.
Stan Schretter, an OLLI member, is an avid amateur photographer and has taught courses at OLLI for many years.

 

F107 Singing for Fun

Thursdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Instructor: Palmer McGrew

As the name says, we gather to have a good time singing songs popular from the ‘30s to today. Class members are encouraged to bring in songs they would like to sing. The only singing talent necessary is the desire to sing. We have a wonderful keyboard accompanist, a percussionist, and an occasional banjo. It’s a lot of fun.
Palmer McGrew, an OLLI member, is a longtime performer in church choirs, barbershop choruses and quartets, and the West Point Alumni Glee Club. He is also co-director of the Greenspring Choristers.

 

F108 Watercolor Painting

Thursdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Instructor: Leonard Justinian
Class limit: 15

This class will provide an opportunity for watercolor painters at all levels to develop fresh skills while learning new watercolor techniques. Required materials include: #1, #6, and/or #8 round watercolor brushes; a paint palette for mixing colors; 140 lb. cold press watercolor paper (Arches is best, but you can use less expensive paper); a kneaded eraser; a Staedtler white plastic eraser; and tubes of watercolor paint in white, charcoal black, cadmium yellow (medium), cadmium red (medium), and ultramarine blue, or a starter set of watercolors.
Leonard Justinian has been painting for more than 60 years. Among other honors, he has received the Grumbacher Award. He teaches watercolor painting in his Fairfax City studio and is also seen on Fairfax Public Access Cable TV, Cox Cable Channel 10, and Verizon FiOS Channel 10. He is a member of the Washington Society of Landscape Painters, www.wslp.org.

 

R109 The Ongoing Pleasures of Music

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 19–Nov. 7
Instructor: Gloria Sussman

This music listening course has continued to live up to its promising title. We explore with pleasure the many facets of classical music with the use of DVDs and YouTube. You may sample the wide variety of musical offerings from previous terms by searching for Gloria Sussman on YouTube.com.
Gloria Sussman has been teaching at OLLI since 2000 and continues to provide entertaining programs for OLLI at Reston.

 

R110 Metropolitan Europe in the 19th and 20th Centuries

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 18–Nov. 8
Four sessions
Instructor: Marion Deshmukh

The growth and transformation of European cities in the last 200 years has been a striking feature of modern history. This course will examine several key cities during critical periods including:
Oct. 18: Introduction and Dickens’ London
Oct. 25: Impressionist Paris
Nov. 1: Fin de siècle Vienna
Nov. 8: Weimar Berlin and conclusion
Each lecture, followed by discussion, will be illustrated, and a suggested reading list will be provided at the first meeting.
Marion Deshmukh, Robert T. Hawkes Professor of History, Emerita, taught German and European cultural history and German art history at George Mason University, including courses on 19th and 20th century Germany, 19th and 20th century German and Austrian art, the Third Reich and the Holocaust, Metropolitan Europe, and Western Civilization. She served as chair of the history and art history department from 1984-1995 and 2006-2007.

R111 Public Art Films

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 21–Oct. 19
No class Oct. 12
Four sessions
Rose Gallery, Reston Community Center Lake Anne
Instructors: Anne Delaney, Jeanne Loveland

Reston’s tradition of making art and culture an everyday part of life in the community evolved with the creation of Initiative for Public Art Reston (IPAR). But how much do you know about public art? Join us and we will explore public art in general and public art in Reston through films that explore the work of well-known artists including Patrick Dougherty, JR, and Robert Smithson. Each session will include one or more short films on public art along with an introduction and discussion.
Anne Delaney has served as Executive Director of the Initiative for Public Art – Reston (IPAR) since 2009. Prior to her work at IPAR, she was cultural attaché at the Embassy of Canada in Washington, DC. Anne holds a BA Honors degree in art history from McGill University, Montreal, and a Master of Museum Studies from the University of Toronto.
Jeanne Loveland’s second career has been in the education department of Greater Reston Arts Center as education director and GRACE art director. She was involved with GRACE Art for 15 years. While at GRACE she worked with IPAR to create a GRACE Art portfolio on public art. Jeanne holds a BS in architecture from the University of Virginia and an MBA in finance from George Mason University. She was formerly a project manager with the Peterson Companies.

 

R112 Women Artists

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 26–Nov. 16
Four sessions
Rose Gallery, Reston Community Center, Lake Anne
Instructor: Jeanne Loveland

Throughout history women artists have been creating art, but their work has been underrepresented in art history and in art museums. Fortunately, the tide is now turning. We will explore women artists through time, from the Renaissance to the present day. Many names will be new to you, but some like Georgia O’Keeffe, Louise Nevelson, Mary Cassatt, and Frida Kahlo will be familiar. These women were very talented artists who faced and overcame challenges because of their gender.
See R111 for instructor information.

 

R113 Al Jolson: The World’s Greatest Entertainer

Thursdays, 9:40–11:40, Sept. 22–Oct. 27
Six sessions
Note time
Instructor: Marianne Metz

A consummate performer and master showman, Al Jolson was a superstar before the word was coined. Though he was born 130 years ago—and part of his career reflected times long gone—Jolson’s musical legacy inspired much of the entertainment industry we know today. This course will start with showings of the award-winning biopics The Jolson Story and Jolson Sings Again, and then we will discuss which parts were accurate. We’ll also view the “first talking picture,” 1927’s The Jazz Singer, and see a subsequent Jolson movie or two. However, Al Jolson made his mark long before he made movies. So, via rare audio and video of performances from 1911 onward, we will try to grasp why Jolson was known as the World’s Greatest Entertainer. If you are unfamiliar with Al Jolson, you’re in for a treat. Even if you think you know him, you ain’t heard nothin’ yet!
Marianne Metz has previously presented classes on Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Alice Faye, Tom Lehrer, and classic American songwriters. She produces and hosts a weekly radio show, “The Melody Lingers On,” that features all of them and more.

 

R114 Meet the Artists

Thursdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 29–Nov. 3
Six sessions
CenterStage, Reston Community Center Hunters Woods
Coordinator: Rosemary McDonald

● Sept. 29: Beverly Cosham and Friends. Cosham combines her extraordinary acting and singing ability with a talented pianist to entertain and perform musical favorites with her loyal and growing following of friends. The award-winning songstress, and her accompanying pianist, engage the audience in dialogue as they discuss and perform musical offerings of all types of music to delight all ages. Cosham is a perennial favorite at Meet the Artists.
● Oct. 6: George Fu, pianist. Fu is a Harvard graduate and has a diploma from the Curtis Institute of Music. He has won numerous piano competitions including first place (2008) National Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition, and first place (2008) MTNA National Senior Piano Duet Competition. He has performed solo concerti with the National Symphony Orchestra, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and the Bach Society Orchestra. Fu is a composer as well and has won several awards for his solo piano compositions.
● Oct. 13: Phoenix Woodwinds Quintet. Rosalie Morrow, flute; Jane Hughes, oboe; Allen Howe, clarinet; Bill Jokela, bassoon; and Ako Shiffer, French horn, will play a varied program from the woodwind quintet literature.
● Oct. 20: Miroslav/Loncar Classical Guitar Duo. Appearing for the fourth time to critical acclaim, this popular husband and wife duo will perform selections from the classical guitar repertoire.  They are both teachers in the Loudoun public schools and maintain a private studio.
● Oct. 27: Dr. Anna Balakerskaia and students. Balakerskaia is a professor of music at George Mason University. She earned her doctorate in piano performance, pedagogy, and chamber music from the State Conservatory in St. Petersburg, Russia. She is a founding member of the “Ensemble da Camera of Washington” and performs in various venues in the Washington area.
● Nov. 3: Dr. Darden Purcell. Purcell is a Washington DC-based jazz vocalist and an active featured soloist with big bands and small ensembles. She is the director of jazz studies, jazz voice instructor, and director of the Mason Jazz Vocal Ensemble at George Mason University. Purcell is a former Air Force Band vocalist, has performed nationally and internationally, and was the featured vocalist with the Airmen of Note, touring and entertaining troops around the world.

 

L115 Beginning Sketching in Loudoun

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 20–Nov. 1
Seven sessions
Instructor: Kathie West
Class limit: 14

Participants with or without drawing experience will learn basic techniques for drawing with pencil and ink. You will be introduced to materials useful in drawing simple objects, still life, and landscapes. (After registration you will be emailed a list of items needed.) Class participation is expected, and practice done at home will be very helpful. Come out and see that you too can sketch.
Kathie West, an OLLI member, was a high school theater teacher at Robert E. Lee High School and Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology. She is also a talented artist whose home serves as an art gallery for her many drawings and paintings.

 

L116 Art History Connections Part 2

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21–Oct. 12
Four sessions
Instructor: John Gallant

In these four sessions, we will examine creative connections between a variety of artists and historical themes. Starting with one artwork, we will trace historical connections moving both forward and backwards in time on a few interesting historical tangents. In Part 1 we looked at the themes of wealth and technology. Themes for Part 2 will address passion and ambiguity. For instance, starting with Artemisia Gentileschi in the 17th century, we will look at how passion is portrayed in medieval art and in 19th century art. Other artists we will touch on include Jacques-Louis David, Gustave Caillebotte, and Maya Lin.
John Gallant is an avid art history buff, who loves sharing his interest in art. He is a retired computer scientist, software development manager, and adjunct professor of computer science. Gallant received his PhD in computer science from Princeton and has worked at a variety of telecommunications and Internet companies developing new software technology.

 

L117 The Making of Impressionism

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Nov. 3–Nov. 10
Two sessions
Instructor: Adrienne Wyman Kralick

The Impressionists are known for painting outdoors, in natural light, capturing fleeting effects of light for a fresh, seemingly effortless effect—with colors that sing, water that sparkles, and wind you can feel. But how did they do that? Claude Monet once said, “When you go out to paint, try to forget what objects you have before you, a tree, a house, a field or whatever… merely think here is a little square of blue, here an oblong of pink, here a streak of yellow, and paint it just as it looks to you, the exact color and shape, until it gives your own naïve impression of the scene.” Today, we think of Impressionism as one of the most popular art movements in history, but that was not always the case. In this two-part lecture, artist and teacher Adrienne Kralick will give her unique behind-the-easel view of Impressionism by examining paintings from an artist’s perspective and reviewing how they were created in the world of their time.
Adrienne Wyman Kralick is a working artist who gives museum tours and teaches painting, focusing on the techniques employed by different artists throughout history. She works at the Smithsonian and is a visiting instructor at other venues, leading tours of France in the path of the Impressionists, from Paris to the beaches of Normandy. Learn more at www.AdrienneArtist.com.

 

200 Economics and Finance

F201 The Great Game: Make Money While You Sleep (or Eat, Pray, Love?)

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 3–Oct. 24
Four sessions
Instructors: Sylvia Auton-Hanvey, Brenda Bloch-Young
Class limit: 20

This course is for you if you are a novice investor or a-be investor who is interested in learning the basics of investing in the stock market in a congenial, learning atmosphere. This course is also for you if you have had a relative or other person investing for you, and you want to understand your investments. The four sessions will lead you through an understanding of “Mr. Market” today, options for simple ways to invest, and, equally important, an understanding of your own needs and your comfort zone for investing.
Sylvia Auton-Hanvey is a retired educator with a PhD in mathematics education. She is a recent investor in the market, and is self-taught.
Brenda Bloch-Young is a retired CPA, with a BBA and MBA in public accounting. She worked as a tax director with PwC. She has been an active investor for over 30 years.

 

F202 The Tom Crooker Investment Forum

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Fairfax Lord of Life
Moderator: Al Smuzynski

The Investment Forum, which meets weekly throughout the year, addresses investment topics of particular interest to retirees. A weekly agenda is distributed, and each session begins with open discussion of recent events in the economy and in financial markets, and their impact on investment decisions. Member presentations typically include topics such as recent market indicators, stocks, bonds, funds (mutual, exchange-traded, and closed-end), Real Estate Investment Trusts (REIT), options, commodities, master limited partnerships, sectors, allocations, and investment strategies. We use analyses and data from the financial press.
Al Smuzynski is a retired bank regulator and an advocate of affordable housing. He currently serves on the boards of Virginia Community Capital and Community Capital Bank of Virginia.

 

F203 An Economics Potpourri

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Coordinator: Leo Brennan

We are again fortunate to have a talented team of George Mason economists return to OLLI. In the complex global economy of this century, today’s economists delve into a wide array of research topics both in a traditional sense and in areas seldom considered in the past. Prepare to be intrigued, provoked, dazzled and enlightened on topics that we may seldom consider in economic terms.
● Sept. 22: Groupthink in Academia: Majoritarian Departmental Politics and the Professional Pyramid. Dan Klein.
● Sept. 29: International Studies. John Nye returns to educate and entertain us.
● Oct. 6: Save Times, Save Lives: The Impact of 9-1-1 on Lethality and Homicides. Thomas Stratmann.
● Oct. 13: Economics research topics. Mark Koyama. New to OLLI, Mark is prepared to educate and enjoy the OLLI experience.
● Oct. 20: Economics research topics. David Eil enjoyed last year so much, he’s back again.
● Oct. 27: Economics research topics. Dan Houser is chair of the Economics Department, and he always delights.
● Nov. 3: The Age of Em: Work, Love and Life when Robots Rule the Earth. Robin Hanson.
● Nov. 10: The Economy of Cuba. Carrie Meyer.

 

300 History and International Studies

F301 The Frontiersmen”

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 26–Oct. 24
Five sessions
Instructor: Jim Anderson

From the earliest New World settlements, the proximity of those vast, wild and unsettled spaces in North America has had a significant impact on the history of our nation. It also has influenced our character as a people, distinct from our European roots. This series will be in two parts of five lectures each in the fall 2016 and spring 2017 sessions. In the first five lectures, we will outline the academic origins of the “frontier thesis,” discuss the frontier concept in popular literature and media, and examine the concept through the biographies of individuals who were on the leading edge of our national expansion westward and who exemplified many of the traits that have come to be associated with the “American Character.” These will include Robert Rogers, Daniel Morgan, Simon Kenton, and Tecumseh.
Jim Anderson spent 27 years with the CIA, including tours in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and Far East.He holds degrees in history from Rhodes College and the University of Memphis. For the past ten years he has conducted corporate leadership training seminars featuring Civil War battlefield visits.He has been an instructor at OLLI for the past 8 years, teaching courses and leading tours focusing on American history.

 

F302 The Rockefeller Giants

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 18–Nov. 8
Four sessions
Instructor: Douglas W. Hottel

John D. Rockefeller Sr. was the richest man in the world and was vilified as the most ruthless businessman in American history. Nelson A. Rockefeller, his grandson, was a progressive Republican politician and philanthropist who went his own way and carved out a remarkable public and private career. Together they exerted a profound and lasting legacy that impacted our national economy, medicine, art, domestic politics, and international relations. Driven by complex emotions and raised in unusual circumstances, these men were never ordinary, and often controversial. Theyout as the most prominent members of an American dynasty.
Douglas W. Hottel has been an OLLI member since 2010, and this is the sixth course he has taught. Hottel received a BA in history/political science from Bethany College, an MA in international affairs from the Catholic University of America, and an MA in national security and strategic studies from the US Naval War College.

 

F303 More Tales from the Back Stairs

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 20–Oct. 11
Fairfax Lord of Life
Four sessions
Instructor: Linda Cunningham Goldstein

● Sept. 20: The Confidential Life of George Washington: stories of how he actually dealt with slavery; his religious beliefs; his love life prior to Martha; and how the acquisition of a great deal of wealth cannot be all bad
● Sept. 27: You’ve Come a Long Way, Baby: Surviving as a Virginia woman in the 18th and 19th centuries
● Oct. 4: Behind the Scenes at the Frank Lloyd Wright House and more “Ghosts of Woodlawn” from personal accounts
● Oct. 11: Eating, Bathing, and Off to Bed, from medievalto the Downton Abbey period
Linda Cunningham Goldstein returns with more stories from personal family history. She or a family member were witness to many of the stories related here, some of which would require a FOIA request to unearth elsewhere. As the former executive director of Woodlawn Plantation and Frank Lloyd Wright’s Pope-Leighey House for The National Trust for Historic Preservation, she knows where the tulips, and other things, are buried. She holds an MFA in visual arts, an MA in museum and curatorial studies under the Winterthur Program with the National Trust, and an MA in fine and decorative art and design from Sotheby’s Institute of Art.

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F304 Explosive Exposés from Watergate to Snowden

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 18–Nov. 8
Fairfax Lord of Life
Four sessions
Instructor: Burt Wides

The instructor has spent about 55 years in Washington, working on most of the domestic and foreign issues in the headlines. He will focus on some key events in his career, such as the Watergate Affair, the Pentagon Papers, the Senate Select “Church Committee,” and the post 9-11 wars and surveillance. In the class he will assess their impact on Congress, the Executive Branch, the Judiciary, and the media, as well as the electorate’s views of Washington.
Burt Wides is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School. He served as chief counsel to Senators Phil Hart, Paul Sarbanes, and Ted Kennedy, and as deputy chief counsel of the Senate Judiciary Committee. He led the investigations of the CIA for the “Church Committee,” and was counsel to President Carter for oversight of all US intelligence activity. In legislative matters, he wrote the original Campaign Finance Law, and helped write the ’70, ’76, ’82, and ’06 Voting Rights Acts, the War Powers Resolution, the presidential executive order barring assassinations, and the requirement that presidents report covert activities to Congress.

 

F305 The Elections of Our Youth: Theodore White and The Making of the President Series

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 20–Oct. 11
Fairfax Lord of Life
Four sessions
Instructor: Greg Cleva

Do you remember watching the Nixon-Kennedy televised debates? Was Barry Goldwater really “right from the start”? Were you “clean for Gene” or did Robert Kennedy capture your imagination? JFK, LBJ, HHH, RFK; the silent majority; the tumultuous 1960s; Chicago 1968; Watergate—what did these things mean to you? And who, for heaven sakes, was William Miller? This four-week class will deal with the presidential elections of 1960-1972—elections in which many of our OLLI members first voted. The journalist/historian Theodore White wrote about these elections in his remarkable The Making of the President series. In addition we will discuss the role and meaning of presidential elections as defined by Nelson Polsby, who has written widely on the subject. The class will run in parallel with the unfolding events of the 2016 election by way of deepening an understanding of the American electoral process.
Greg Cleva has a PhD in international politics from the Catholic University of America and is a retired foreign affairs analyst with the Department of Defense.

 

F306 Journalism and Politics in Modern America

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 18–Nov. 8
Fairfax Lord of Life
Four sessions
Instructor: David Heymsfeld

The media has been called “The Fourth Branch of Government” to recognize the critical role the media plays in determining what political issues are important and how they will be evaluated. This course will present a brief history of the evolution of media. We’ll begin with partisan newspapers that were controlled by political parties in the early days of our country. We will then consider the role played by independent papers, such as the Hearst and Pulitzer empires of the late 19th century. We’ll examine the evolution of media coverage from the mid-20th century mainstream press, weekly newsmagazines, and TV network news, to today’s more complex structure of partisan talk radio, cable news, and digital media. After an historical overview we’ll consider more specifically how the media have influenced history in the 20th and 21st centuries, particularly:
Investigative reporting, including the muckrakers, as well as Woodward and Bernstein on Watergate
• Editorial opinion, including Murrow on McCarthy and Cronkite on Vietnam
• Influential “pundits,” including Walter Lippmann and Rush Limbaugh
• TV and photographic images, including civil rights, Vietnam, and presidential campaign debates
• Reporting of wars, particularly contrasting World War II and Vietnam
David Heymsfeld, an OLLI member, served on the professional staff of the House Transportation Committee for 35 years. He has long been interested in modern American history and is a volunteer guide for the Newseum.

F307 Civil War Potpourri

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15. Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Instructor: Patrick McGinty

Countless Civil War studies have been written about the contributions of various groups in the war. These include German-Americans; Irish-Americans;
African-American Union troops, such as the 54th Massachusetts infantry regiment; and the average soldier (male, Caucasian, and Christian). The emphasis in this course will be on the contributions of “overlooked” groups who fought in the Civil War. Topics examined will include, but will not be limited to, the following: Jews in the Civil War, African-American Confederates, women combatants, child soldiers, and other topics that arise as the course develops.
Patrick McGinty, an OLLI member, is a retired naval officer with an MA and PhD in history from Georgetown University. He has taught various history, political science, and psychology courses in Texas, Maryland and Virginia. His areas of specialization at the University of Maryland University College were: the history of terrorism, the history of violence in America, and the history of substance abuse in America.

 

F308 The Silk Road: The Gobi Desert and Beyond

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 20–Nov. 10
Four sessions
Instructor: Robert Springer
Class limit: 45

For 1,500 years the Silk Road provided the only land contact between the east and west and was the route followed by Marco Polo and many others in their travels. The great camel caravans that crossed searing deserts and tortuous mountain passes carried valuable cargoes that brought prosperity and culture to the regions it touched, but also had a long term impact on world civilization itself. In these four classes we will discuss a number of special topics related to the Central Asian and Middle Eastern countries through which the route passes. These include such important subjects as how the route was used for commerce; inventions from China, such as the compass, which changed Western Europe; the spread of religions and cultures along the Silk Road; and how it was used by conquering armies, especially the Mongols, to spread their control over much of the ancient world. For those of you interested in traveling to this area, we will discuss some travel opportunities along the Silk Road.
Robert Springer is a professor emeritus at American University where he taught for many years and was a department chairman. Springer also lectured at Loyola University, and the universities of Hawaii and Utah. His academic background includes the US Military Academy at West Point, Stanford University, Georgetown University and George Washington University.

 

F309  1787-1789: A New Government and Three Presidents

Thursdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Fairfax Lord of Life
Coordinators: Brad Berger, Emmett Fenlon

The year 1787 proved to be monumental for the fledgling United States of America. As spring evolved into summer, a convention held in Philadelphia by delegates of the states created a document which proved to be the framework of an entirely new government. The ratification of the plan ended the days of the Articles of Confederation. Little did the delegates know that the influence of this document, the Constitution of the United States of America, would also serve to shape the form of governments outside American borders for centuries to come. This is the story of that formidable document and the government it created. Within its framework, three titans of our independence, George Washington, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson, guided the nation in the new era. Each had distinct notions of how the new machinery of government would work and the powers and limitations afforded them in their roles as Chief Executive.
National Park Service rangers have participated with OLLI in over 80 thematic courses, special events and trips since 2001.

 

R310 Coastal Potpourri and Legends

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 17–Oct. 31
Three sessions
Instructor: Raoul Drapeau

Oct. 17: Caribbeana. This potpourri introduces attendees to the great variety in the islands and people of the Caribbean Sea. Learn some little-known facts about the area, including historical oddities, unusual political constructs, lost gold, bizarre natural phenomena, harnessing the Gulf Stream, and more.
● Oct. 24: Maritime Mysteries and Monsters. Over the ages, there have been many legends and reports of strange objects and animals in lakes and oceans, such as the Loch Ness Monster, undersea buildings, the Bimini Road, and Atlantis. We will examine these and see which ones are even possible.
● Oct. 31: Speedway to Sunshine. Henry Flagler built a long, but short-lived, railroad line from Miami to the Florida Keys to help his rich friends travel south for the winter, as well as boosting trade with Cuba, Latin America, and the Panama Canal builders. With some justification, it is also called Flagler’s Folly.
Raoul Drapeau graduated from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute with a master’s degree in electrical engineering. Most recently he has worked as principal and co-founder of several high-tech firms in the Washington, DC area.

 

R311 History of Immigration in the United States

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 20–Oct. 11
Four sessions
Instructor: Richard Stillson

When I was growing up in California in the 1950s, a question sometimes asked of any new kid was “What are you?” The question was understood to mean “What country did your family come from?” or “What is your nationality?” The expected answers were Irish, English, French, Mexican, Chinese, or any nationality other than American. Although their families may have first come to the United States many generations ago, somehow the immigrant status of families was still considered important, even among kids. While we are a nation of immigrants, immigration has been a controversial issue since John Adams’ Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798, and continues to be one of the most provocative issues in our very contentious politics. What is “American culture” in a country that is constantly changing because of the mix of immigrants, each maintaining large parts of their original culture? This course will help put these questions and the broader issues in context by looking at the detailed history of immigration in the United States.
Richard Stillson has a PhD in economics from Stanford. After a career at the International Monetary Fund, he retired to indulge his passion for history and earned a PhD in history from Johns Hopkins. Stillson is the author of Spreading the News: A History of Information in the California Gold Rush.

 

R312 Irish History: Fintan the Wise to Fianna Fáil

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 20–Nov. 8
Instructor: Kevin Barry Deasy

Included in the Irish Diaspora are some 30 to 40 million Americans—and many OLLI members. If you wonder what your restless ancestors were up to before they left the Auld Sod, this broad survey of Irish history covers 10,000 years, from pre-Celtic artifacts and ancient legends to the founding of the Irish Free State. In between, you’ll find Fomorians, Gaels, Vikings, monks, Galloglasses, Saxons, Normans, Spaniards, Frenchmen, High kings, English kings, invasions, battles, plantations, risings, spies, informers, Unionists, Republicans, Black-and-Tans, the Anglo-Irish War of Independence, and a nasty civil war.
OLLI member Kevin Barry Deasy hails from a long line of Irish rebels (and is named for one who got caught and hanged). Nevertheless, he cautions that neither the Loyalist narrative nor the Republican narrative can, by itself, convey the whole truth of Ireland’s turbulent history. A retired US Army officer, Deasy holds a BS in electrical engineering from Northeastern University, and MS degrees in computer science and business management from George Washington University. He has worked as an engineer and manager at several government contracting firms around the Washington beltway, most recently at Northrop Grumman.

 

R313 Rangers’ Choice: A Different Topic Every Week!

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 20–Nov. 1, Nov. 15
Note dates
Rose Gallery, Reston Community Center Lake Anne
Coordinators: Brad Berger, Emmett Fenlon

Mystery topics abound! There is no thread that binds the lectures week to week! The National Park Service rangers will reveal eight new topics, one on each presentation day. We will explore obscure local connections to people, places or events that few rarely, if ever, associate with either Washington, DC or the repertoire of National Mall park rangers.
National Park Service rangers have participated with OLLI in over 80 thematic courses, special events, and trips since 2001.

 

R314 A New Look at the Old Dominion

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21–Oct. 12
Four sessions
Rose Gallery, Reston Community Center Lake Anne
Instructor: Ken Plum

The history of Virginia’s leadership in the formation of our nation has been explored, romanticized, and debated from the Commonwealth’s decline and secession to its emergence as a modern state. Examine the latest scholarship on the state’s history through lecture, discussion, and recommended readings. You will gain a better understanding of the Commonwealth that is Virginia.
Delegate Ken Plum is one of the founders of OLLI and a popular leader of courses on Virginia’s history and government. He is a native Virginian who holds degrees from Old Dominion University and the University of Virginia. His weekly commentary appears in a local newspaper and in his electronic newsletter, Virginia E-News. He is the longest serving member currently in the Virginia House of Delegates.

 

R315 History of the Supreme Court

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 19–Nov. 9
Rose Gallery, Reston Community Center Lake Anne
Four sessions
Instructor: Ben Gold

Since its first session in 1790, the US Supreme Court has risen from a body with little power and prestige to become the most powerful and prestigious judicial institution in the world. Its decisions have profoundly shaped not only American law, but also our society, as the nation has grown dramatically in population, geographical expanse, and racial and ethnic diversity. We will examine how the court has acted on such diverse issues as federal and state power, economic regulation, slavery and segregation, political protest, religion, abortion and gay rights. And we will also take a look at what’s happening at the court today.
Ben Gold has a BA in political science from Stanford University and earned an MS in computer science. He has served as a docent at the Supreme Court for the past 15 years.

 

R316 Impact of Television on Elections

Wednesdays, 2:15­3:40, Oct. 5–Oct. 26
Rose Gallery, Reston Community Center Lake Anne
Four sessions
Instructor: Glenn Kamber

This course will trace the evolution of television coverage since 1960 and its influence on presidential elections. Particular attention will be paid to changes wrought by the introduction of cable television, 24-hour-a-day broadcasting, and social media on campaign messaging, financing, public accessibility, and public opinion.
Glenn Kamber is an OLLI member and instructor. Over the past four years, he has taught a number of courses at Reston that focus on current events and political and social issues that affect our lives. He is a retired senior executive from the US Department of Health and Human Services where he managed policy and program development in the immediate office of eight HHS secretaries.

 

L317 The Black Death

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 19–Oct. 3
Three sessions
Instructor: Stephanie Campbell

The 14th century saw one of history’s deadliest pandemics unleashed on mankind. The Black Death may have killed more than 100 million people throughout Eurasia, and its impact could be felt for centuries after the disease subsided. Three lecture sessions will explore the spread of the bubonic plague from its start in central Asia to its culmination in western Europe. Topics will include epidemiological theories, religious responses, contemporary scientific explanations, persecution as a response, and the economic and cultural repercussions.
Stephanie Campbell received a BA in history and a BA in medieval and Renaissance studies from the College of William and Mary. She earned her MA in history at Catholic University. She is a history instructor at Northern Virginia Community College, and her expertise is medieval history.

 

L318 Engineers of Victory: Problem Solvers Who Turned the Tide in the Second World War

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05
Sept. 20–Sept. 27, Oct. 11–Nov. 8, No class Oct. 4
Seven sessions
Instructor: Mark Weinstein

How did the United States go from a small, poorly equipped military in 1940 to the massive military of 1945? Most warfare discussions concentrate on leaders’ grand strategies. This course differs; it focuses on how national strategies were implemented by mid-level and often invisible ordinary solders, scientists, engineers, and businessmen through advancements in technology and management.
● Part 1 “Arsenal of Democracy” discusses how US industry, particularly automotive, was restructured and reorganized beginning in pre-war 1940.
● Part 2 discusses how the British Admiralty used the new field of Operational Research to stretch limited resources to defeat German submarines, and then revolutionize the way wars are planned, waged,   and won.
● Parts 3 and 4 discuss individual technological leaps that provided the Allied forces with the tools to overcome specific Axis capabilities. The 1943 Casablanca Conference laid the grand design for the invasion of Europe and the eventual campaign against Japan. That was easy; then came the most massive planning and supplying operation in history.
Mark Weinstein, a nine-year OLLI member, is a retired electrical engineer and a docent at both Smithsonian Air and Space Museums. He started building model aircraft when he was 10 and continued through a career in the active and reserve Air Force. He is a history buff, news junkie and is intrigued by technology. In his wild youth and single days he flew a Piper Tri-Pacer.

 

L319 Légion Étrangère d’Français: Then and Now

Tuesdays 11:50–1:15, Oct. 4–Oct. 11
Two sessions
Instructor: Michael Kastle

The purpose of this course is to provide a short and concise history of the Légion Étrangère—the French Foreign Legion—from its troubled founding in the war-torn early 19th century through its various adventures in Africa, the French-Mexican War, two World Wars, the Near East, and the Far East. The course will include descriptions of the Legion’s major battles, expeditions, uniforms and equipment, as well as its current makeup and where it is stationed today.
Michael Kastle is an OLLI member. He has an engineering degree from the Illinois Institute of Technology and is a registered professional engineer in the state of Illinois. He retired from US government service in 2007, having spent over half of his 25 years of service in overseas locations.

 

L320 Zelikow’s Take on the 20th Century, Part 4

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21–Oct. 12
Four sessions
Moderator: Ray Beery

This is the last of four blocks comprising University of Virginia Professor Philip Zelikow’s online course in world history. In this course we care about chronology, and we care about individuals. Without some careful attention to sequences of cause and effect, without tracing how big changes come from the choices made by particular people, history can turn into just a series of descriptions, a somewhat tiresome recitation of one thing after another. So beyond offering a set of remarkable stories, this course gives you experience in how to analyze a situation and think about the problems of explaining change. The four-week, massive open online course (MOOC) will be viewed in class, with an hour of video instruction each week. There will be live interaction. The course is from Coursera, an educational website that partners with some of the world’s top universities, including the University of Virginia, to provide free online courses.
Ray Beery is a member of the OLLI Board of Directors and frequent teacher.

 

L321 The Elections of Our Youth: Theodore White and The Making of the President Series

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 21–Oct. 12
Four sessions
Instructor: Greg Cleva

This is a repeat of F305.

 

L322 America’s Civil War Up Close and Personal

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Instructor: Keith Young

This course will cover several topics dealing with how the American Civil War was fought on land and at sea, including who was doing the fighting and how they conducted themselves. General Order Number 100, which was issued during the war, was an early attempt to define the rules of war. We will discuss the fate of captured soldiers on each side as they went to prisoner of war camps.
Keith Young, a retired naval officer with an interest in military history, lectures on many Civil War and World War II topics.

 

400 Literature Theater & Writing

F401 Shadow Divers: Solving the Mystery of “U-Who”

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 19–Oct. 10
Four sessions

Instructor: Beth Lambert
In 1991 two recreational scuba divers, Robert Chatterton and Richie Kohler, set out to discover the identity of a WWII German U-boat they had found deep in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of New Jersey. Strangely, neither the German nor the United States navies had any record of a U-boat lost in those waters. The search took the two divers down 260 feet into the Atlantic Ocean and also across that ocean to Germany. In his book Shadow Divers, journalist Robert Kurson gives a compelling and accurate account of Kohler and Chatterton’s seven-year quest to discover the name of the U-boat they dubbed “U-Who,” the reason it sank, and the identity of the 56 German crew members whose bodies were still on board. Kurson does a masterful job of weaving together the technical aspects of deep sea diving and German U-boat protocol with the emotional impact of the venture on the lives of all those involved—those who were lost on the U-boat and those who were lost discovering it. Reading assignments will be given ahead of time; the book can be purchased in soft cover, or a Kindle edition.
Beth Lambert, an OLLI member, is a retired professor of English at Gettysburg College, where she taught courses on all aspects of 18th century England. At OLLI she teaches some of her favorite subjects (with Jane Austen’s novels ranking high among them), and she loves sharing them with OLLI members.

 

F402 OLLI Players Workshop

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 19–Nov. 7
Clifton Lord of Life
Instructor: Kathie West

This is a continuing acting and producing workshop for serious theater-minded participants conducted by the OLLI Players, an amateur theater group affiliated with George Mason University. In our repertoire we incorporate lyrics, short scenes, monologues, and original plays which have been performed at various venues. In this course, you will learn the ins and outs of presentation, memorization skills, and acting tricks. If we are asked to perform at a hospital, senior center or other venues, you must be willing to travel during the day, mostly on Fridays. If you have a scene or a play you would like to see put on, bring it along, and we will try it. Come, join, and be willing to tout OLLI and your talents!
See L115 for instructor information.

 

F403 Readers’ Theater

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 19–Nov. 7
Clifton Lord of Life
Coordinators: Michelle Blandburg,
Dave Mason, Mo Mason, Pati Rainey, Kathie West
Class limit: 28

OLLI’s Readers’ Theater is great fun for the “secret actor” in all of us! Scripts are usually monologues, short skits, and acts or scenes from longer plays. Parts may be handed out in advance or read cold. No memorization is required. We rehearse before class; rehearsal can also be by phone when necessary. Props or costumes are not required. If you’ve tried RT before and dropped out, come back. We are always trying new things!

F404 Memoir Writing

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 20–Nov. 8
Instructor: Dianne Hennessy King
Class limit: 24

Learn to write about your individual and shared history in ways that will clarify your vision, whether you are looking into your past, documenting your present, or contemplating your future. During class there will be some writing exercises in response to prompts, such as quotations, music, and video clips. We’ll also share some ideas on memoir techniques.
Dianne Hennessy King is a cultural anthropologist, writing instructor, editor, and television producer. For many years she was the coordinator of the annual “Writing Your Personal History” symposium in Vienna and has helped plan the Virginia Writers Club symposium in Charlottesville. Dianne is the co-author of Memoir Your Way: Tell Your Story through Writing, Recipes, Quilts, Graphic Novels, and More.

 

F405 A Novel for All Seasons: Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 20–Nov. 8
Instructor: Donna Macurdy

The Old Man and the Sea is considered to be Hemingway’s finest novel. Written in direct response to his critics, the old man is a reflection of Hemingway himself. Published in 1952 in Life Magazine, the story resulted in the sale of over five million issues in 48 hours. Released in hardcover, the story remained on the best seller list for six months. Join me on the journey to “catch the one” that almost got away. Sail the waters of the Cuban coast with the old man. Then decide if Hemingway achieves what he set out to do, i.e., “to succeed when others believed he would fail.” Lecture and small group discussion will be a part of each class. In order to capture the mood of the journey, we will also be viewing Spencer Tracy’s highly acclaimed portrayal of the old man in the 1958 movie.
Donna Macurdy is a retired Fairfax County high school English teacher. Donna has a MEd in curriculum and instruction from George Mason University and a BA in English and speech communications from the University of Denver. Donna has taught a number of literature classes at OLLI including The Great Gatsby and To Kill a Mockingbird.

 

F406 Poetry Workshop

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 20–Nov. 8
Moderators: Mike McNamara, Jan Bohall
Class limit: 16
This workshop allows both novice and experienced poets the opportunity to share their work and receive suggestions for improvement. Workshop members should bring an original poem in draft or revised form to each session. Two poems should be sent to the Tallwood office for duplication one week before the first class meeting and a third poem brought to the first session. The moderators will email students after registration to let them know exactly when and where to send their poems for the first class.
Mike McNamara, an OLLI member, has been published in several literary journals and magazines and has received awards from the Poetry Society of Virginia.
Jan Bohall, also an OLLI member, has had poems published in various periodicals and has won awards from the Poetry Society of Virginia.

 

F407 The Literary Landscape

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Instructor: Kay Menchel
In this survey course, we’ll look at a number of different literary devices, such as metaphor, allegory, free indirect discourse, and irony. We’ll discuss how they enrich and complicate storytelling, and how they have evolved concurrently with literature’s various narratological forms. As modern readers, we are so accustomed to figurative language and other aesthetic techniques that we frequently fail to notice them. However, when we do, they can open up a text, revealing entirely new dimensions of meaning.
Kay Menchel, who grew up in Yorkshire, England, is a lawyer who also holds an MA in English literature from George Mason University. She has taught numerous literature classes and always enjoys sharing her passion for English literature with OLLI members.

 

F408 Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15
Sept. 21–Oct. 12, Oct. 26–Nov. 16, No class Oct. 19
Instructor: Ellen Moody
Class limit: 25
We will read Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones in the context of his age and his several careers: dramatist, attorney-magistrate, journalist, and novelist. As we read the book, we’ll focus on the slippery narrator, the evasive nature of the text, and discuss themes of power, sex, commerce, the pursuit of happiness, and the masks of social and psychological life. We’ll see how its pictures derive from Hogarth, and how it connects to Swift, de Sade, and Jane Austen. In the 20th century it was adapted into oddly innocent films filled with wild hilarity, savagery and sexual salaciousness, while at the same time sermonizing benignly at us. Can you imagine a world without novels? This is one of the books that established the genre.
Ellen Moody holds a PhD in English literature from the Graduate School of City University of New York (CUNY). A lecturer for over 30 years, her last position was at George Mason University. She has published numerous essays, reviews, and editions of four texts on 18th century literature, women’s studies, and film adaptations.

 

F409 An Acting Workshop for the Serious Actor

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Clifton Lord of Life
Instructors: Wendy Campbell, Manny Pablo, Kathie West

This is an acting class for those mature actors among us who want to hone their acting skills by working seriously on a script until they truly understand the character they are portraying. Over time, and with constructive criticism and input from our fellow thespians, we will work to sharpen such things as inflection, voice projection, physicality, focus and blocking while retaining spontaneity and the making of fearless choices. We will try to decide what kinds of props are necessary for the understanding of the action. In short, we would like to gather a few actors together who want to improve their acting skills. All participants will practice a number of roles, with the intent to audition at the end of the term for an available part in a spring production of one or more of the plays. Participants must purchase scripts. Information will be provided.
Wendy Campbell graduated from Marymount University with an MEd. She taught in the gifted program in Fairfax County public schools for 20 years, introducing 10-12 year olds to the wonders of Shakespeare, Plautus and Sophocles.
Manuel Pablo is a longtime OLLI member who dabbles in many areas, from music, to history, to art, and even poetry, hoping to find something he is good at. He is getting a fine education along the way.
Kathie West, an OLLI member, is a former high school theater teacher at Robert E. Lee High School and Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology.

 

F410 Meet the Authors

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 22–Oct. 13
Four sessions
Coordinators: Katie Mitchell, Rala Stone

Do you choose your reading materials based on word of mouth, best sellers, good reviews, or book covers? Let’s add another dimension—AUTHORS, the geniuses behind the books published. Come and meet a few. Listen to them discuss their book and possibly their inspiration source, writing process, research requirements, and publication trials.
● Sept. 22: Beth Lambert, former Gettysburg College professor and an OLLI member/instructor, brings history alive with Edmund Burke of Beaconsfield.
● Sept. 29: Barbara Saffir, former Washington Post reporter, provides the information on 30 self-guided urban tours in Walking Washington, D.C.
● Oct. 6: Karen Branan tells about miscegenation, mob violence, and murder in The Family Tree.
● Oct. 13: Elizabeth Ticknor, an OLLI member, will surprise us with readings from Secrets, an Odyssey; Spicy Alphabet Soup; Endangered Species; or, maybe, her soon-to-be published fourth book.

 

F411 HaikuFun, Understanding, and Maybe Some Satori

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 20–Nov. 10
Four sessions
Instructor: Mike McNamara
Class limit: 20

While most here in the United States and in other countries are somewhat aware of Japanese haiku, that understanding is just the proverbial tip of a rice field. For all its brevity, haiku has more rules, rewards and quirks than almost any other form of poetry. We’ll examine the foundations of haiku, what it is and does. We’ll also revue its often raucous and ironic sister, senryu, and provide the means and time for individuals to try their hand at these unique poetry forms. (This is a revised and updated version of a class given at Tallwood in December 2014.)
Mike McNamara, a retired Army infantry colonel, has degrees in English from Rutgers University and the University of Kansas. He is also a graduate of the NATO Defense College in Rome and the Royal College of Defence Studies in London. He has taught at several colleges in the US and abroad, and is a co-moderator of the OLLI Poetry Workshop. A published and award-winning poet, he has generally lectured on international poetry and Shakespearian tragedies at OLLI. He and his wife have collected Japanese graphic art for the past 30 years.

F412 It Ain’t for Sissies:  Movies about Aging

As most OLLI members can attest, getting older means dealing with a variety of complex emotional and physical issues. These eight movies offer poignant stories about older folks coping with different aspects of life. We’ll have a quick introduction to each movie before it is screened, and time for discussion afterwards. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, and you may even feel younger!

  • Ladies in Lavender (2004 – Judi Dench, Maggie Smith)
    Two sisters befriend a mysterious foreigner who washes up on the beach of their 1930s Cornish seaside village.
  • Harry and Tonto (1974 – Art Carney, Ellen Burstyn)
  • When his apartment building is torn down, a retired lifelong New Yorker goes on a cross-country odyssey with his beloved cat Tonto.
  • On Golden Pond (1981 – Katharine Hepburn, Henry and Jane Fonda)
    Norman is a curmudgeon whose relationship with his daughter Chelsea is strained. At Golden Pond, he and his wife deal with family issues, and an unexpected relationship blooms.
  • Fried Green Tomatoes (1991 – Jessica Tandy, Kathy Bates)
    A housewife who is unhappy with her life befriends an elderly woman in a nursing home and is enthralled by the tales the woman tells of people she used to know.
  • The Savages (2007 – Philip Seymour Hoffman, Laura Linney)
    This sleeper tells the touching story of two siblings who must take care of their estranged, and ailing, father.
  • My Old Lady (2014 – Maggie Smith, Kevin Kline)
  • An American inherits an apartment in Paris that comes with an unexpected resident.
  • About Schmidt (2002 – Jack Nicholson, Hope Davis)
    Upon retirement and the loss of his wife, a man embarks on a journey to his estranged daughter’s wedding only to discover more about himself and life than he ever expected.
  • The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2011 – Judi Dench, Maggie Smith)
    British retirees travel to India to take up residence in what they believe is a newly restored hotel. Though less luxurious than advertised, the Marigold Hotel slowly begins to charm in unexpected ways.

R413 The Strangeness of Edgar Allan Poe

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 19–Oct. 10
Four sessions
Instructor: Conrad Geller

Edgar Allan Poe was the first American to earn worldwide fame as a writer, and his works are still widely admired more than 200 years after his birth. Poe is also credited with the invention of the modern horror and detective story genres. By consensus, he is one of America’s foremost poets; “The Raven” is possibly the best-known poem in the English language. His life was an absolute mess, but all of his writings show enormous discipline, skill, and attention to detail. In these four sessions we will examine the great variety of his work, both prose and verse. Texts will be available online, and at the OLLI DocStore.
Conrad Geller, an OLLI member, is an avid though inexpert reader of English literature. Previous courses he has taught at OLLI include “Strictly Sonnets,” “English Ain’t What You Think,” and “Selections from Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales.”

 

R414  Two by Virginia Woolf

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 17–Nov. 7
Four sessions
Instructor: Linda Blair

One of the most enigmatic and powerful female writers of the 20th century, Virginia Woolf focuses on two significant issues: women and the unconscious self. In order to understand her position as a woman in a male-dominated educational world, we will study in detail A Room of One’s Own in one session. In the second, third, and fourth sessions we will discus To the Lighthouse, a three-part stream of consciousness novel spanning approximately 10 years, during which time World War I began and ended. Through close textual readings of both works, along with clips from the film version of To the Lighthouse, we will evaluate the juxtaposition of aspects of feminism with the life of the imagination.
Linda Blair, a retired Fairfax County high school English teacher, English department chair, and International Baccalaureate diploma program coordinator, earned her doctorate in American literature at The George Washington University.

R415 What is a Documentary?Four sessions

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 20–Oct. 25
Six sessions
Coordinator: Norma Jean Reck
Documentary filmmaking is experiencing an explosion in recent years in theater, TV, and even on our phones. The Washington, DC area is one of the strongest centers for documentary filmmaking and exhibition in the country. In this class, we will learn how documentaries are made, how to think about them critically, and how they are making a difference in our world. We will meet local filmmakers, educators, and leaders of local film organizations. Be prepared to offer your critique, opinion, and suggestions on documentaries shown.
● Sept. 20: Basics of documentary filmmaking. Erica Ginsberg, an executive with Docs in Progress, will introduce us to documentary filmmaking. She will cover the language, the intention of the filmmakers, constructed nature, and scene deconstruction.
● Sept. 27: Local filmmakers. Melissa Houghton, director of Women in Film and Video, will introduce local filmmakers who will show clips and discuss their work.
● Oct. 4: The Last Song Before the War. Melissa Houghton will introduce filmmaker Kiley Kraskouskas who will discuss her film on Festival au Désert in Mali.
● Oct. 11: History of filmmaking. Giovanna Chesler, program director and associate professor of film and video studies (FAVS) at George Mason University, will continue the history of filmmaking and introduce Bill Nichols’ concept of documentary “modes” or genres.
● Oct. 18: Films from Mason students. Giovanna Chesler will feature films of students in her FAVS class at Mason.
● Oct. 25: Favorite documentaries. Sky Sitney, who programmed the Silverdocs film festival for several years, will discuss some of her favorite docs.
Norma Jean Reck got hooked on documentaries and how they are made after attending a meeting of Docs in Progress at The George Washington University many years ago.

 

R416 Literary Roundtable

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Reston’s Used Book Shop at Lake Anne
Moderators: Janice Dewire, Carol Henderson
Class limit: 21

This short story discussion class will begin a new anthology, 100 Years of the Best American Short Stories, edited by Lorrie Moore and published in 2015 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. The book is a compilation of 40 stories from the hundred-year history of the annual Best American Short Stories volumes. A 1917 Edna Ferber story opens the anthology, followed by selections from the twenties, thirties and forties. Authors covered this fall include Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and Welty. The hardback edition is available for $22 or less online and in bookshops or in e-book editions. It will also be used for classes to be held in the winter and spring terms.
Janice Dewire and Carol Henderson are enthusiastic Literary Roundtable participants and former OLLI Board members who took on the moderator role some years ago for this popular course, one of the longest running in Reston.

 

R417 So You Wanna Write Poetry, but Don’t Think You Can

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Instructors: Ed Sadtler, Carolyn Wyatt
Class limit: 10

This is a class for those who would like to write poetry, but don’t think they can, or think they might be able to write it if they were motivated. Each session will be divided into three segments: a discussion of craft, a time to write, and a time to share what’s been written. Come and surprise yourself!
Carolyn Wyatt is a retired federal information officer who traveled widely in that position. She has an MA in Spanish from Indiana University and aspires to be a poet and a wise woman.
Ed Sadtler is a graduate of Shippensburg State College of Pennsylvania, has conducted many writing workshops at OLLI, and has taught poetry writing classes for the Lifetime Learning Institute of Northern Virginia Community College.

 

R418 The Literary Landscape

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Instructor: Kay Menchel

This is a repeat of F407.

 

L419 The New Yorker Round Table

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 19–Nov. 7
Coordinators: Ellen Grimley, Richard Orlin
Class limit: 20

This course will consist of informal discussions of material from The New Yorker magazine or its website. Class members are encouraged to suggest items from any issue of the magazine. In past sessions discussions have been based on articles, profiles, fiction, poetry, and cartoons. Before each class, the coordinator will email the material to be discussed. The class is highly interactive. Discussion usually goes beyond the printed material to include personal knowledge or experiences class members may have had relevant to the topic.

 

L420 The Sonnets of William Shakespeare

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 5–Nov. 9
Six sessions
Instructor: Karen Miles

The 154 sonnets of Shakespeare treat issues that we still wrestle with in our own lives. They include the inevitability of death and physical decay, the fickleness and treachery of people, the vanity of worldly achievements, the nature of true and false love, the tension between our physical and spiritual selves, the qualities of good poetry, and the power of art. Remarkably, the sonnets distill these experiences into rigidly structured poems of just 14 lines and use familiar images from nature and the everyday world. We will also explore the nature of the collection itself. To what extent are the sonnets a collection of discrete lyrical reflections whose order is arbitrary and random? To what extent do the sonnets recount the progression of the relationships among a poet, his young male friend, his mistress, and a rival poet or two? The recommended text is Shakespeare’s Sonnets (Folger Shakespeare Library), edited by Barbara Mowat and Paul Werstine.
Karen Miles holds a PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in French literature. She taught at Marquette University and the University of Wisconsin-Parkside before becoming a program officer at the National Endowment for the Humanities. Since retiring, she has co-taught several courses at the Washington National Cathedral, including one on Shakespeare’s sonnets.

 

L421 Movie Matinees

Thursdays, 1:45–3:45, Sept. 22, Oct. 6–Nov. 3
(No class on September 29)
Six sessions
Note time
Coordinator: Len Blistein

In this course we will look at a few comedies, a few musicals, and maybe a thriller or two. The exact titles will be decided before the first class and will be sent to all those who registered.

Movies shown will be: Grumpy Old Men, Groundhog Day, Brigadoon, High Society, Now You See Me, and The Italian Job

 

L422 Writer’s Workshop

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21-Nov. 9
Instructor: Ed Sadtler
Class limit: 10 

This class uses a roundtable format that fosters an environment for writers of all levels to give and receive encouragement, feedback, and constructive criticism. All genres of writing are welcome, including poetry, fiction, memoirs, and historical pieces. To these categories we apply the same underlying commitment: to write a compelling work that fully conveys the author’s intentions.
Ed Sadtler is a retired salesman, turned daring, if almost-never-published poet, who nevertheless insists on continuing to read, write, and talk about poetry to anyone foolish enough to listen.

 

500 Languages

 

F501 Spanish Conversation, Intermediate II

Mondays: 9:40–11:05, Sept. 19–Nov. 7
Instructor: Ligia Glass

Spanish Conversation, Intermediate II, is a class for people who want to speak Spanish on a variety of topics given by the instructor or suggested by students. The focus of this class is to encourage students to talk one-on-one, or as part of a group. Guest speakers will enhance the knowledge of the culture of the Hispanic world and its people. The goal is to converse in the language as much as possible in a friendly and enjoyable setting. You do not need to have taken Spanish Conversation, Intermediate Part I to take Part II. All you need is to lose your fear of speaking and be prepared to have fun with this group!
Ligia Glass is a native of Panama and retired from the Securities and Exchange Commission. She has over 20 years’ experience teaching all levels of Spanish, as well as Latin American literature. She has also taught Spanish with the Fairfax County Adult Education Program (ACE) and has been an OLLI instructor for several years. Glass holds an MA in foreign languages, MA in Latin American area studies, and ABD in Latin American literature.

 

F502 Italian for Travelers

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 20–Nov. 8
Instructor: Laura Vinti
Class limit: 40

This Italian course for beginners is designed for Italy lovers who wish to be able to interact with locals on their next trip to the Bel Paese and to deepen their understanding of Italian culture. Sessions will be held both in English and in Italian, and will provide participants with the basic language skills needed to deal with everyday situations: at the airport, calling a hotel or bed and breakfast to reserve a room, ordering a meal, understanding the menu, asking for directions, etc. Furthermore, the instructor will explain Italian customs and traditions, and promote intercultural competence. Part of each session will be devoted to a particular region/city in order to give participants off-the-beaten-path ideas on places to explore on their next trip.
Laura Vinti has taught Italian for over 20 years, both in Germany and in the US. While in Germany, she taught Italian language and culture at the Heidelberg and Mannheim universities. She is currently adjunct professor of Italian at George Mason University. Vinti is the founder and owner of Laura Vinti’s Italy, a boutique travel company specialized in unique and customized tours to Italy.

 

F503 Spanish Conversational Forum

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Instructor: Bernardo Vargas Giraldo
Class limit: 16

The objectives of the Spanish Conversational Forum are to practice the Spanish language and learn about Spanish/Latino culture through articles, photographs, videos, and speakers. Classes are conducted entirely in Spanish. English will be used only occasionally to explain grammar and idiomatic expressions. A prerequisite for this class is an ability to converse in Spanish at the high intermediate to advanced level. Students are encouraged to make presentations in Spanish on timely topics of their choosing. Come join us and improve your Spanish.
Bernardo Vargas Giraldo received his doctorate in legal science at the Pontificia Universidad Católica Javeriana in Bogotá, Colombia, and specialized in public administration and international business at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. He is currently a writer and analyst of economic and political subjects.

 

F504 Beginning French

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21–Oct. 12
Four sessions
Instructor: Joëlle Torreele

This short course is an introduction to French language and culture. The objective is for students to learn basic vocabulary, common expressions, and quickly understand some essential ideas and principles. Students will also receive online resources so they can explore these subjects more thoroughly on their own and decide whether or not they want to pursue further study at a more advanced beginner’s level. Handouts will include notes on lessons, activities, optional homework, and online links.
● Sept. 21: Introductions, greetings, and goodbyes. Basic prononciation. Tu vs. Vous. Exploring links to online resources.
● Sept. 28: Simple questions, the verbs être (to be), and avoir (to have), the negative, numbers 1-10, road and guide signs, and money.
● Oct. 5: Expressions used in shops, in a hotel, in emergencies, and food and drinks.
● Oct. 12: Review. French culture and questions and answers.
Joëlle Torreele is a retired Fairfax County Public Schools French teacher. She has taught all levels of French, including French literature. Her first studies included fine arts and art history. With a BA in foreign languages, she obtained her French K-12 certification as well as a master’s degree in educational leadership.

 

F505 Latin II

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Instructor: Alana Lukes
Class limit: 16

This continuing course is for beginning Latin students with knowledge of the present, imperfect, perfect, and pluperfect verb tenses as well as the noun endings of the 5 noun declensions. We take a modern, nontraditional sight, sound, and internet approach to this ancient language. By reading about the adventures of a 1st-century CE young man visiting Roman Egypt, we continue to explore Latin grammar, vocabulary, and ancient Roman culture. Class meetings employ a media version of the text, North American Cambridge Latin Course, Unit 2, 4th edition. Purchase of the text for home study is optional. A fee of $5 will be due after confirmation of enrollment. The fee offsets e-learning program costs.
Alana Lukes, an OLLI member, has taught Latin for over 25 years at the middle school, high school, and college levels.

 

R506 Intermediate Spanish Conversation, Part 3

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 19–Nov. 7
Instructor: Pamela Garcia

This is Part 3 of an intermediate conversation course for people who can converse in Spanish about basic topics in the present tense and are ready to talk about past experiences. The focus of the class will be conversational in nature, with topics that describe people, pastimes, daily routines, health, music, visual arts, shopping, dining out, and travel. The primary purpose of this course is to foster the participants’ increased proficiency in conversational settings by reinforcing basic expressions and vocabulary. Anyone who has a basic grasp of vocabulary in the present tense is welcome. You do not need to have taken Part 1 or Part 2 to enroll in this course.
Pamela Garcia recently retired from teaching all levels of Spanish in Montgomery County Public Schools. She has a BA in Spanish and master’s degrees in bilingual multicultural education and supervision.

 

R507 French Conversation

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 20–Oct. 11
Four sessions
Instructor: Marge Hogarty
Class limit: 15

Anyone who has had even a little bit of French can benefit from this new conversation class for travelers and Francophiles. We will cover useful topics from daily life and French culture.
Marge Hogarty a Chicago native, has been teaching, tutoring and reading French for over 50 years. She has been to France many times as well as to francophone West Africa and Quebec Province. She has an MA in French from Middlebury College and has taught in high schools in Illinois, New York and Connecticut. She has also worked as a travel agent and a realtor.

 

600 Religious Studies

F601 Survey of Non-Traditional Beliefs

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 20–Oct. 25
Six sessions
Instructor: Linda Bender
Class limit: 30

During the class we will explore such non-traditional concepts as karma, reincarnation, the chakras, mystics and the mystical sects, non-medical healing systems like Reiki or therapeutic touch, the implications of free will choice and being responsible for the results of our choices, the alchemist’s physical elements (air, earth, etc.), and the layers of energy in the body. Our focus will be on understanding the concepts and implications of the various topics, using examples and discussion questions, including how to recognize them in actual day-to-day situations. We will talk about how facets of these beliefs might be used as effective tools should you be interested in doing so. There will be time for questions so be sure to bring them to each session. There will be handouts for each class with a list of resources relating to the topics discussed.
After obtaining a BA in mathematics from Cornell, Linda Bender spent 20 years as an Army intelligence officer’s wife and another 30 years managing billing offices for hospital and physician practices. She has continued her interest in and learning about non-traditional beliefs. She has also taught meditation systems for OLLI. Please see http://olligmu.org/profiles/index-profiles.html for more information about her background and experience.

 

F602 Jesus’ Final Week and the Beginnings of Christianity

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 27–Nov. 8
Seven sessions
Instructor: Steven C. Goldman

The last week of Jesus’ earthly ministry provides many foundations for the birth of Christianity. However, there are major disagreements regarding the spiritual meaning and historical understandings of events that transpired during that final week. Our analysis will include texts within the New Testament as well as sources from non-canonical writings. Major issues we will explore include the following:

  • Why was Jesus welcomed on Palm Sunday and rejected later in the week?
  • Did Jesus declare himself to be Messiah? Did he declare himself to be God? Or did others say this about him?
  • Did Jesus seek to overturn the existing religious order? Did he pose a threat to Roman rule?
  • What was the intent of his commands at the Last Supper?
  • What did Jesus teach about “end times”? Who was responsible for the execution of Jesus?
  • Did Jesus physically rise from the dead? How do we explain the different accounts of the Resurrection?
  • How are we to understand Jesus’ teaching regarding his “Second Coming”?

Steven C. Goldman is the chair of OLLI’s Religious Studies Program Planning Group and has taught numerous courses on alternative understandings of Biblical doctrine.

 

 

F603 The Theology of Les Miserables

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 18–Nov. 8
Four sessions
Instructor: Steven C. Goldman

Sacrifice, forgiveness, the refusal to accept forgiveness, repentance, redemption, law, justice, grace, mercy, pride, greed, humility, and perfected love are some of the grand themes of the human condition explored in Victor Hugo’s classic 19th century novel Les Miserables. We will examine how it presents a romantic, sublime theology that challenges us regarding our own ethical standards and interpersonal relationships.
See F602 for instructor information.

 

F604 Religion in American History

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 19–Nov. 9
Four sessions
Instructor: John Turner

English author G.K. Chesterton once described America as “a nation with the soul of a church.” Other Europeans commented that while American religion was less bland than its cuisine, it was just as baneful. In this course, we will survey the history of religion in America, that is, in the geographic region that became the United States. In four weeks, we will discuss Puritanism and its encounter with the New World; religion and the American founding; Catholics, Mormons, and Jews, and movements against them; and the rise and fall of the Religious Right.
John Turner teaches in the Department of Religious Studies at George Mason University. He has written several books on the history of religion in the United States and is currently at work on a history of Plymouth Colony.

 

F605 Women of the Bible: Saints, Vamps and Vixens

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 22–Oct. 13
Four sessions
Instructor: Stephen Ruth

Were Jezebel, Delilah and Bathsheba misunderstood? Which Bible women would be successful as leaders today? There are dozens of significant women in the Old and New Testament who are relatively little known today: Lilith, Queen Athalia, Saphira, Rahab, two Tamars, Lydia, Hulda, Abigail, Priscilla, the widows of Zelophehad, sisters Martha and Mary, plus others who are well known, like Sarah, Esther, Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Jesus. In this course we will examine as many as eighty of these intriguing women, whose reported deeds range from heroic to treacherous and profane. We will concurrently review some of today’s public policy issues that these great personalities faced, such as women’s rights, punishments for rape, inheritance rules, women in government, abortion, and many more. We also will briefly examine the roles of a few of these Biblical women as they are mentioned in the Muslim tradition, in the Holy Koran. No religious training is needed and the course is open to all persons, regardless of faith tradition.
Professor Stephen Ruth, a long-time OLLI presenter, taught an OLLI course called “Is America a Christian Nation?” and is currently teaching two technology courses in the graduate school of public policy at Mason. This OLLI course will reflect his background as an amateur Bible scholar. He is the author of the book One Year Trip Through the Bible: Daily Readings and Reflections: A Layman’s Fresh Perspective on The Complete Old and New Testaments.

 

R606 Catholic Social Thought in the Modern Era
Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 19–Oct. 10
Four sessions
Instructor: Gregory Cleva

The beloved Brazilian archbishop, Dom Helder Camara, once remarked, “When I give food to the hungry they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor are hungry, they call me a communist.” It is an unfortunate fact that many Catholics, as well as members of other religions, are unaware of the rich tradition of social teachings and social justice in the Catholic faith. Moreover, the US Catholic Conference of Bishops noted that this lack of understanding weakens the Church’s capacity to be faithful to the demands of the Gospel. This four-session course deals with the social teachings of the Catholic Church in the modern era. The first and second classes will highlight the principal teachings themselves, as well as their historical and scriptural basis. The third and fourth classes will focus on the recent emphases in these teachings, particularly the primacy Pope Francis affords to the “preferential option for the poor.” Please join us for this lively and informative discussion. Everyone is most welcome.
See F305 for instructor information.

 

L607 The Jesus of History

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 10–Nov. 7
Five sessions
Instructor: Jack Dalby

New Testament scholar John Dominic Crossan once said, “It is impossible to avoid the suspicion that historical Jesus research is a very safe place to do theology and call it history, to do autobiography and call it biography.” So just who was the Jesus of history? Was he a cynic philosopher, Marxist, messiah, revolutionary zealot, protofeminist, prophet, son of God, magician, or God? In this course we will attempt to reconstruct the Jesus of history by examining what modern historians have to say about this enigmatic 1st century Palestinian Jew. Topics for discussion will include: sources for the historical Jesus, the critical methods historians use to evaluate these sources, and how human memory affects the stories told about him. We will also examine what historians have written about the major chapters in the life of Jesus. There will be ample time for questions and discussion. Owning a copy of the New Testament is useful but not mandatory.
Jack Dalby, president of White Oak Communications, is an OLLI member who has taught classes on the historical Jesus, St. Paul, and early Christianity. He holds a BS in communication arts from James Madison University and has taken graduate history classes at George Mason University.

 

L608 Introduction to Rabbinic Judaism

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 18–Nov. 8
Four sessions
Instructor: Gilah Goldsmith

For over a thousand years, Jewish thought and practice have been shaped by the writings of the classical rabbis: the Mishnah, Midrash and Talmud. In the aftermath of the destruction of the Second Temple by the Romans in the year 70 CE, these rabbis transformed a religion based on animal sacrifice and national identity into one based on the sanctification of daily life through prayer, study and ethical conduct. This course will survey the basic beliefs of these rabbis, how they expressed those beliefs, and how those beliefs have structured the lives and thought of the Jewish people ever since.
● Oct. 18: Scribes, Pharisees, and Sages: the origins and sources of Rabbinic Judaism from a historical and literary perspective.
● Oct. 25: God, Creation and Torah: Rabbinic assumptions about the relationship between the Master of the Universe, humanity, and the Jewish people.
● Nov. 1: The Life of Torah: How the rabbis structured time, food, money, and sex to sanctify daily life.
● Nov. 8: Reward and Punishment: Rabbinic views on life after death, and the coming of the messiah.
Gilah Goldsmith, a graduate of Harvard University and The George Washington University Law School, is a retired government attorney who, for 20 years, has led the weekly Torah study group at Beth El Hebrew Congregation.

 

L609 Religion in American History

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 19–Nov. 9
Four sessions
Instructor: John Turner

This is a videoconference of F604.

 

650 Humanities and Social Sciences

F651 Cultures and Religions of East Asia

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 19–Nov. 7
Instructor: Johnnie Hicks

The study of world cultures embraces centuries of histories, geographies, traditions, and religious beliefs that constitute a group’s understanding of human life and their place within it. This course takes us on a cultural journey to explore the “Three Wisdoms of East Asia:” Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. Following a study of China, we will journey through the religions and cultures of Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and Cambodia, recognizing similar values but unique traditions related to their own histories, geographies, languages, and spiritual beliefs. Finally, we will learn about the diversity and immigration stories of Asian Americans, and acknowledge their many contributions to the tapestry of American culture.
Johnnie Hicks is an OLLI member who has previously taught courses on the Middle East, Cultures of Afghanistan and Central Asia, and “Feng Shui for Your Home.” She has a lifelong passion for the study of world cultures and has traveled to many countries. Prior to retirement, she worked in Fairfax County Public Schools and for 23 years taught graduate-level courses in Middle Eastern studies, multicultural education, and counseling global populations at Mason.

 

F652 Spinoza’s Ethics

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 20–Nov. 8
Instructor: Irmgard Scherer

Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677) was a controversial, tragic, yet philosophically fascinating figure in the history of early modern philosophy. Maligned and ostracized from his Jewish community in Amsterdam for his alleged atheism, he was also described by Novalis as “the most God-intoxicated philosopher who ever lived.” In this course we will examine Spinoza’s five-part Ethics in some detail and from several perspectives, and attempt to make sense of contradictions and ambivalences in his work. Spinoza argued that there is only one Substance, God or Nature, and human beings exist as “modifications” to that substance. They are determined or predetermined. This raises the question of freedom. Of special interest is Spinoza’s theory of emotions which still offers insights for contemporary studies. Finally, we will consider the question: was Spinoza an atheist or not?
Irmgard Scherer, a US citizen born in Germany, is associate professor of philosophy emerita at Loyola University Maryland. She taught core and honors ethics courses, upper level courses in her area of specialty: Kant and 18th century aesthetic theory, and topics in the history and philosophy of science. She has published on Kant and related issues. Since retiring, she has taught philosophy courses for OLLI both at George Mason and American University.

 

F653 The Dust Bowl

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 20–Oct. 11
Four sessions
Instructor: Rita E. Way

In 1934 darkness fell across the United States when dust storms hit New York City, Chicago, and Boston. These dust storms were born from a 100 million-acre dead zone two thousand miles away in the Great Plains, also known as the “bread basket” of America. These states were about to face a devastating drought and oncoming crises, a “perfect storm” that was about to destroy one of our most fertile grasslands. It was one of the nation’s worst environmental cataclysms. The course will cover this historical catastrophe through lecture, discussion, and viewing the acclaimed film maker Ken Burns’ documentary, The Dust Bowl. To reiterate Winston Churchill’s speech to the House of Commons in 1948, “Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.”
Rita E. Way studied at the Sacred Heart Hospital School of Nursing. She worked as a medical-surgical nurse for 12 years, after which she worked for a long-term care company that owned and managed both skilled nursing and assisted living homes. Nursing and medicine have always been her passion. Way has taught other courses at OLLI such as “The History of Medicine” and enjoys teaching so much, that she put together this course.

 

F654 Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Church of the Good Shepherd
Coordinators: Camille Hodges, Johnnie Hicks

The “Created Equal” initiative was launched in 2013 by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to mark the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The purpose of the initiative is to encourage members of communities to revisit the history of civil rights in America and to reflect on the ideals of freedom and equality that have helped bridge deep racial and cultural divides. Using video content and materials provided by NEH, this course will examine selected historical civil rights events and compare/contrast them with present and possible future civil and social issues. The format consists of exploratory questions, selected film clips, and guided discussion. Presenters for each session are George Mason University professors and others directly involved with the topics covered in this course. This course coincides with the official September opening of the new Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) in Washington, D.C.
● Sept. 21 and Sept.28: The Abolitionists. Stefan Wheelock, PhD, Asst. Professor of English at Mason, will focus on Atlantic history and culture, with emphasis on late 18th to early 19th century black antislavery writing.
● Oct. 5: Slavery by Another Name. Wendi Manuel-Scott, PhD, Associate Professor of History and Art History and Director of African and African American Studies at Mason.
● Oct. 12: The Loving Story. Bob Zener, OLLI member and retired lawyer who served as Assistant Chief of the Civil Appellate Section and Appellate Litigation Counsel at the US Department of Justice.
● Oct. 19: Freedom Summer. (Presenter to be determined.)
● Oct. 26: Freedom Riders. Joan Trumpauer-Mulholland, former member of the Non-violent Activist Group (NAG) and participant in the June 8, 1961 New Orleans, LA, to Jackson, MS, Freedom Ride via the Illinois Central Railroad.
● Nov. 2: Racial Integration of the US Armed Forces. Alan Gropman, PhD, retired US Air Force colonel and adjunct professor at Mason’s School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution.
● Nov. 9: Current and Future Directions of Civil Rights in the US. A panel of experts will participate in a town hall discussion of current issues and consider the future cultural, social, and political implications of the issues. Members of the panel include: Fairfax County branch NAACP president, Shirley Ginwright; Dr. Alan Gropman; Arlington NAACP branch president, Karen Nightengale; and other community leaders.
* This class is free and open to the public.  You do not need to be an OLLI member to attend.

 

F655 The Mind-Body Problem in Modern and Contemporary Philosophy

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Instructor: Emmett Holman

Perhaps the hottest topic in Anglo-American philosophy these days is the mind-body problem. The mind-body problem arises when one starts asking about the nature of the mind; and it is called the mind-body problem because the answers to this question generally fall into one of the two broad categories, depending on how they conceive of the relation between the mind and the body. On one hand, there are physicalist (or materialist) theories of mind, according to which the mind is identical to, or in some way reducible to, the physical brain; and on the other hand, there are dualist theories of mind, according to which the mind, though certainly connected to the brain in some way, is itself something non-physical. In this course, we will look at the pros and cons of these theories, beginning with the 16th century French philosopher Rene Descartes, and then jumping to the work that has been done on this from the mid-20th century on.
Emmett L. Holman earned his BS in physics from Penn State University. He holds a PhD in philosophy from the University of Maryland and taught philosophy at George Mason University for 45 years. While at Mason he taught upper level undergraduate and graduate courses on the mind-body problem and has published articles on that subject.

 

F656 Contemporary Issues in Criminology

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Oct.13
Four sessions
Facilitator: Cynthia Lum

In this course, four experts from the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society at George Mason University will give presentations on contemporary issues in criminology. Students will have the opportunity to learn about current research from one of Mason’s most active departments.
● Sept. 22: Cynthia Lum, director of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy, will facilitate the course, and present the first lecture on the results of the 2015 Fairfax Community Survey of the Fairfax County Police Department.
● Sept. 29: David Wilson, chair of the department, and his doctoral student Catherine Kimbrell will discuss their current research on a major concern of the criminal justice system: bail bonds.
● Oct. 6: Allison Redlich, a leading expert on court processes, will present her research on wrongful convictions.
● Oct. 13: Christopher Koper, the principal fellow of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy, will present on policing “hot spots” of crime.

 

F657 Enhancing Your Well-Being

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 20–Nov. 10
Four sessions
Coordinator: Mark Thurston

Staff and scholars from Mason’s Center for the Advancement of Well-Being (CWB) will provide four perspectives on how you can flourish and thrive in your life.
● Oct. 20: Mindful Awareness Practices for Increasing Clarity, Compassion, and Inner Calm. Mark Thurston, PhD, is a psychologist and director of educational programs for CWB. Among the courses he has taught at Mason have been “Mindful Leadership” and “Conflict Transformation from the Inside Out.”
● Oct. 27: The Power of Positive Emotions. Beth Cabrera, PhD, is the author of Beyond Happy: Women, Work, and Well-Being (ATD Press), and a senior scholar at CWB.
● Nov. 3: Living Your Life with Strengths. Dr. Nance Lucas, associate professor at George Mason University and executive director of CWB.
● Nov. 10: Meaning and Purpose in a Life of Well-Being. Thurston will present for a second time.

 

R658 All about Marriage

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 19–Oct. 10
Four sessions
Instructor: Glenn Kamber
This four-week course will examine the history of marriage from biblical times to the present, including the role the institution of marriage has played in defining and maintaining family and community structures, and the economic and political order. The instructor will discuss the relatively recent introduction and impact of “love” in marriage and various approaches marriage and family therapists use to identify and address issues when love falters.
Glenn Kamber, an OLLI member and instructor for six years, is a retired senior executive from the US Department of Health and Human Services. He earned an MS in family and child development, a clinical degree in marriage and family therapy from Virginia Tech, and an MA in government and education from Teachers College, Columbia University. After retiring from federal service, Kamber briefly was a private marriage and family therapist in McLean, Virginia, and a contract in-home family therapist with the Prince William County Community Services Board.

 

L659 The 7 C’S of Communication

Wednesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 21, Oct. 5–Nov. 9
No class on Sept. 28
Seven sessions
Instructor: Josh Pachter
If you’re interested in building deeper, richer, more rewarding relationships with your family and friends, this course is for you! “The 7 C’s of Communication” is an illuminating and entertaining model for considering the real-world challenges and opportunities of interpersonal communication.
Josh Pachter is Northern Virginia Community College—Loudoun’s assistant dean for communication studies and Theater. Since he is in charge, you know you’re in for a thought-provoking and intellectually stimulating ride!

 

L660 Contemporary Issues in Criminology

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Oct. 13
Four sessions
Facilitator: Cynthia Lum

This is a video teleconference session of F656.

 

L661 Genocide and Genocide Denial in American History

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Oct. 27
Six sessions
Instructor: Al Carroll
Has genocide taken place on American soil, or been carried out by individual Americans, or the American government? This course will explore these questions, looking at Columbus, the Trail of Tears, atrocities in California and Texas, the slave trade, and US government actions in the Philippines, Guatemala, and Peru. We will also look at US responses to the Holocaust and other genocides in Armenia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Darfur, East Timor, Rwanda, and Syria, and debate what are the best, most effective, and most moral responses.
Al Carroll is associate professor of history at Northern Virginia Community College, teaching American, American Indian, and Latin American history for 12 years. He received his MA from Purdue and his PhD from Arizona State University and was a Fulbright Scholar in Indonesia. He is the author of four books, including Presidents’ Body Counts and Survivors: Family Histories of Surviving War, Colonialism, and Genocide.

 

700 Current Events

F701 What’s in the Daily News?

Mondays, 9:30–11:00, Sept. 19–Nov. 7
Note time
Moderators: Don Allen, Dorsey Chescavage,
Mel Axilbund, Caroline Cochran
Class limit: 38
Do you have an opinion about what is happening in the world today? Would you like to express and to share your views with others? Join other news junkies each week to discuss, debate, and yes, sometimes disagree, as to the significance and meaning of events—both great and small. All views are welcomed in a spirit of give-and-take.
Dorsey Chescavage is an OLLI member; she retired from the Jefferson Consulting Group, where she was a registered lobbyist, specializing in military and veterans’ health care.
Don Allen is also an OLLI member and a retired civil servant; in the last ten years of his service he focused on developing and managing the Navy’s Base Closure and Realignment Commission (BRAC) caretaker program.
Mel Axilbund, a lawyer, from 1965 through 1980 was engaged in criminal justice reform activities at the US Justice Department and American Bar Association. He spent the next 15 years in a private general practice in Northern Virginia. Finally, he spent 18 years on the trademarks side of the Patent and Trademark Office.
Caroline Cochran has taught current events and English to foreign students at NOVA.

 

F702 Great Decisions 2016

Wednesdays 11:50–1:15, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Moderators: Gordon Canyock, Ted Parker
Class limit: 30
For over 50 years, the Foreign Policy Association has sponsored discussion groups throughout the United States to investigate some of the world’s greatest challenges affecting our lives. This course is a repeat of the spring term course with the same name, and covers the same eight topics: the Middle East; the Rise of ISIS; the Future of Kurdistan; Migration; the Koreas; the United Nations; Climate Change; and Cuba and the United States. A briefing book and video covering each week’s topic will set the stage for class discussion. There is a $24 materials fee, payable within one week of enrollment confirmation.
Gordon Canyock is a retired military intelligence officer, former State Department consultant, and long-time member of OLLI.
Ted Parker has been an OLLI member for several years and is a retiree from the US Department of Education. He had a 40-year career in education, which included teaching and management at local, state, and college levels.

 

R703 All the News That’s Fit to Print

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Moderator: Dick Kennedy
This is your chance to discuss news and current events with other OLLI members who are trying to understand our changing world. More than ever, we need to question information that comes to us from TV, radio, the Internet, magazines, and newspapers. We will examine and discuss some of the day’s hot topics in world, national, and local news. In order to have time to explore issues and get various insights, we usually focus on a small number of topics. This is an interactive class, and all viewpoints and opinions are respected, needed, and welcomed. As Walter Cronkite once said, “In a democracy agreement is not required, but participation is.”
Dick Kennedy, an OLLI member, is a retiree from the senior executive service at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. He enjoys analyzing the news from multiple sources and engaging in good discussions with colleagues.

 

L704 Korea: North and South

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 20–Sept. 27
Two sessions
Instructor: Greg Scarlatoiu

● Sept. 20: The North Korean Conundrum. This session will address the history, current state, and future prospects of the North Korean human rights situation. How does the repressive Kim regime maintain the status quo? What are the US and international communities doing to effect change? Scarlatoiu will also address the factors that contribute to the longevity of the Kim regime, as well as the forces that are eroding the Kim family’s grip on power.
● Sept. 27: The Han River Miracle: South Korea’s Past, Present, and Future. The second session will address the economic, social, and political evolution undergone by South Korea since its establishment in 1948. Scarlatoiu will discuss South Korea’s astounding economic development, also known as the Han River Miracle. There is a darker side to that miracle; it is the price South Koreans had to pay to achieve economic success. Finally he will also describe the current political outlook of South Korea, as well as political security, trade, and investment issues pertaining to the US-South Korea alliance.
Greg Scarlatoiu has an MA in law and diplomacy from the Fletcher School, Tufts University, and an MA and BA from Seoul National University, Department of International Relations. Currently he is executive director of the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea.

 

L705 Introduction to the U.S. Agency for International Development

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 18–Oct. 25
Two sessions
Instructor: John Champagne

USAID was established in 1961 during the Kennedy administration to help advance economic progress in developing countries. After more than 50 years existence and untold development assistance accomplishments worldwide in areas of education, health, agriculture, human capital expansion and overall economic growth, the role of USAID as the lead federal agency responsible for economic development and humanitarian relief abroad remains widely misunderstood and controversial. The course will begin with a review of USAID’s mission, history, organization and funding, and move on in the second session to a discussion of the agency’s expanding role in supporting U.S. foreign policy objectives in an increasingly hostile global environment.
John Champagne is a retired USAID Foreign Service Officer with overseas tours in Thailand and Panama, and separate liaison assignments with the Department of State. His final career assignment was Director of Middle East Affairs. He has a BA in political science and an MA in international relations. Before joining USAID he served as an officer with the Army Special Forces.

 

800 Science, Technology & Health

F801 Pulsars: An Adventure to Explore the Wonders of the Star

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 17–Oct. 24
Two sessions
Instructor: Paul A. Murad

There are many wondrous events in the solar system that warrant further investigation such as pulsars. Pulsars, as well as neutron stars, were unknown until discovered with radio telescopes in the late 1960s. Neutron stars are usually created by a supernova in an implosion that reduces a star larger than our sun to an object about 10-20 kilometers in diameter. With a misaligned axis between their magnetic field and rotational axis, they rotate from 10 to 600 times per second. Does rotation of a spinning neutron star alter gravity? Somehow there is harmony within a binary pulsar about the weights of the bodies, the trajectories, and the spin rate of the neutron star. This view varies from the conventional wisdom, offering a different approach to these challenges. Although some mathematics are involved, these rationales point to a new awakening.
Paul A. Murad has given many courses at OLLI Mason in such areas as gravitation, the race to the moon, a serious view of flying saucers, and ancient nuclear explosions on the Martian surface. As a mechanic, a machinist, engineer, scientist, and former intelligence officer, he was involved with satellites, the Apollo mission, and the Space Shuttle.

 

F802 Changing Behavior: Tips, Tricks, and Techniques

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 31–Nov. 7
Two sessions
Instructor: Colleen Pelar

We are all creatures of habit. To a large extent, this is helpful as it frees our minds to work on other things. However many of our habits don’t serve us well. Intellectually we may believe we should behave differently, but when push comes to shove, we fall back into our familiar routines. Changing behavior can be challenging, but it can be made easier. We will discuss some of the reasons change can be difficult, explore ways to develop new habits, and strengthen our ability to persevere. In the first session, we’ll focus on changing our own behavior and create a plan for the coming week. In the second session, we’ll evaluate our personal progress, talk about stumbling blocks, and make adjustments. Then we’ll turn our focus to the intriguing topic of what we can do to change someone else’s behavior.
Colleen Pelar knows a thing or two about motivation. As a mother, dog trainer, author, and speaker, she is always studying strategies for improving communication and fostering cooperation. Colleen earned her bachelor’s degree at Penn State and is a member of the National Speakers Association. She is a believer in building strong relationships, and that is a primary theme in her three books, two geared toward adults and one for children.

 

F803 Memory Errors

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 20–Oct. 11
Four sessions
Instructor: Jim Sanford

This class will examine errors in memory we commonly make. We will begin with a discussion of the development of a cognitive approach to psychology in this country, followed by a discussion of Daniel Schacter’s (1999) The Seven Sins of Memory. The remainder of the class sessions will go into greater detail of some of the specific sins that Schacter identifies. Topics include a research paradigm showing that people are absolutely certain they were presented words when, in reality, only a group of related words was presented. Other issues include the (questioned) existence of recovered memories from early childhood; and the (again, questioned) existence of “flashbulb” memories, such as having a perfect memory to answer the question, “Where were you and what were you doing when President Kennedy was shot?”
Jim Sanford is an OLLI member and a professor emeritus at George Mason University from which he retired in 2014 after 41 years of teaching in the Department of Psychology. His research concentration concerned issues in memory. He earned his PhD from Kansas State University.

 

F804 Medical Updates from the Health Professionals at Inova Fair Oaks Hospital

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 22–Oct. 13
Four sessions
Coordinator: Cathey Weir

● Sept. 22: Pelvic Floor: Treatment options for urinary incontinence as you age. Janice Arnold, MD, board certified urologist.
● Sept. 29: Stroke Education: Prevention, warning signs and treatment. Regina (Jean) Snyder, RN, CNOR, Stroke Program coordinator at Inova Fair Oaks Hospital.
● Oct. 6: Shoulder and Neck: Common injuries and the latest treatments. David Novak, MD, board certified in orthopedic surgery and orthopedic sports medicine.
● Oct. 13: ENT/Sleep Issues. M. Peter Sorensen, MD, board certified ENT specialist and nationally recognized leader in otolaryngology.

 

F805 United States Forests and Climate Change

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 20–Nov. 10
Four sessions
Coordinator: Fred Kaiser
Climate change is arguably the toughest environmental challenge of the 21st century. One of the biggest contributors to climate change is carbon dioxide. When kept healthy, the 751 million acres of forests in the United States decrease the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by absorbing it from the air and converting it into clean oxygen, which they release, and carbon, which they store. The four sessions will cover the following topics:
● Oct. 20: The Resilience of United States Forests. Doug MacCleery, forest management, US Forest Service (Retired)
● Oct. 27: United States Forest Carbon Sequestration. Linda Heath, director forest science and forest policy, US Forest Service
● Nov. 3: The Current Situation of United States Forest Land and Recent Trends. Brad Smith, Associate National Program Manager, Forest Inventory and Analysis.
● Nov. 10: Policies Needed to Address Forest Sustainability with a Changing Climate. Dave Cleaves, US Forest Service climate change adviser (retired)

 

F806 Beginner Chen-Style Tai Chi

Thursdays, 2:15–3:15, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Note time
Instructor: Jerry Cheng
Class limit: 25

Tai chi, a form of martial arts practiced for centuries, is meditation in motion that emphasizes balance, posture, and concentration. This beginning class will focus on Chen-style tai chi, which promotes health and fitness, strengthens the immune system, relieves neck and back pain, corrects digestive problems, aids emotional and psychological well-being, relieves stress, and builds character. Please wear loose clothing, and plan to work in stocking feet or soft, flexible shoes.
Jerry Cheng was born in China and started his martial arts training when he was six years old. He studied under several famous Chinese martial arts masters, including grandmaster Sha GuoZheng, and won four gold medals at the 1997 Atlanta International Martial Arts Championship. He taught tai chi at the University of Georgia for six years and at the University of Texas for three years.

R807 Mobile App Potpourri

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 17–Nov. 7
Four sessions
Instructor: Stan Schretter

This class will discuss apps for your mobile devices, such as iPhones, and tablets—both iPad and Android. We will describe apps that may be new or have been around for a long time but are not yet part of your library. Part of each class will be devoted to your questions and comments on your experiences with your mobile devices.
See F106 for instructor information.

 

R808 Demystifying Dementia

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 19–Oct. 24
Six sessions
Instructor: Christi Clark

Currently, one in nine people over 65 has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, but what can you expect after the diagnosis? This class will give you an understanding of the disease, enable you to start planning for the future, or give you ways to adjust to a new life with someone who has dementia. The course will cover the basics of dementia, distinguishing types, the typical path of progression, communication techniques, the reasons for troubling behaviors, and ways to engage with a person with dementia. Services available to caregivers will also be discussed.
● Sept. 19: Normal Aging versus Dementia: Know the 10 Signs of Alzheimer’s disease.
● Sept. 26: Diagnosis Dementia…Now What?
● Oct. 3: The Path of Progression in Alzheimer’s disease.
● Oct. 10: Are They Doing That on Purpose? Understanding Behaviors and Effective Communication Strategies.
● Oct. 17: Person-Centered Dementia Care.
● Oct. 24: I Need Help: Where to Turn for Support Services.
Christi Clark, director of education and support services at Insight Memory Care Center, has over 15 years of experience in the field of long-term care.

R809 Gentle Yoga

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00–12:00, Sept. 20–Dec. 15
(No Class: Nov. 22, Nov. 24, Nov. 29, Dec. 1)
Note dates and times
Reston Community Center Lake Anne
Twenty-two sessions
Instructor: RCC Staff
Class limit: 5

This traditional yoga class is designed for senior adults (55 years and older), and incorporates both stretching and strength postures while focusing on balance. Participants will experience increased strength, flexibility, balance, coordination, and energy in a gently challenging way. This class incorporates standing poses as well as poses on the floor. Participants should be comfortable getting up and down from the floor. Please bring a blanket, pillow, or beach towel to class. Registration for this class is on a first come-first served basis. There is a $110 fee, payable to OLLI at the time of registration. (Refer to page 52 for “add to cart” instructions.) Those registering will also need to complete a Reston Community Center registration waiver form and take it to class on the first day. The form can be found at http://www.restoncommunitycenter.com/docs/default-source/forms/registrationformfeb16.pdf?sfvrsn=0. Registration is not final until a completed RCC waiver is received.

 

R810 Tai Chi Chuan, Eight Ways (55 years and older)

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:30–12:30, Sept. 13–Oct. 20
Twelve sessions
Note dates and times
Reston Community Center Lake Anne
Instructor: RCC Staff
Class limit: 7

Learn eight simple movements derived from the Tai Chi Yang Style Short Form by Master Cheng Man Ching. Each movement is a separate and complete unit that can be practiced by itself, independently of the others, and conveys all the benefits of Tai Chi. Emphasis is on balance, relaxation, and ease of movement. Registration for this class is on a first
come-first served basis. There is a fee of $60, payable to OLLI at the time of registration. (Refer to page 52 for “add to cart” instructions.) Those registering will also need to complete a Reston Community Center registration /waiver form and take it to class on the first day. The form can be found at
http://www.restoncommunitycenter.com/docs/default-source/forms/registrationformfeb16.pdf?sfvrsn=0.  Registration is not final until a completed RCC waiver is received.

R811 What’s Hot and What’s Not? An Update of the Chernobyl and Fukushima Nuclear Reactor Accidents

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Nov. 3–Nov. 10
Two sessions
Instructor: Evan Douple

This year marked the 30th and the 5th anniversaries of the world’s two worst nuclear power plant accidents and the only two given Level 7 classification on the International Nuclear Event Scale. The public has often been confused and misled by information about the current status of the abandoned settlements of Pripyat and Okuma. In two sessions we will review and contrast the two events: what caused them, what took place in the opening days of the crises, the amount of radiation that escaped into the atmosphere, the evacuations of affected populations, the plans for decontamination efforts, and the implications of radiation exposure on human health. The discussion will focus on lessons learned from the two events; the complex and wide-ranging social, political, and environmental issues surrounding them; and how resolution of the issues might affect the future role of nuclear power.
Evan Douple, an OLLI member, is a retired director of the Board on Radiation Effects Research of the National Academy of Sciences, and was associate chief of research at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima, Japan when the Fukushima event occurred. He earned a PhD in radiation biophysics at Kansas University.

L812 Memory Errors

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 20–Oct. 11
Four sessions
Instructor: Jim Sanford

This is a videoconference of F803.

L813 Navigating Your Ocean of Emotion: Feeling Better from the Inside Out

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 17–Nov. 7
Four sessions
Instructor: Debra Dalby
Navigating Your Ocean of Emotion is a wellness program that utilizes neurobiology, psychology, and mindfulness approaches to mood management. Many of us manage moods through some effort to control them, only to have these emotions return—sometimes with greater intensity. The result is a sense of being out of control, feeling overwhelmed as if drowning in a sea of sensations. With a deeper understanding of our emotions, we can achieve a sense of resilience and empowerment that gives us confidence in our ability to manage our lives. Participants will be guided in: (1) Exploring the “why” of emotions and how our bodies are the vehicles for expression of emotions; (2) Understanding the brain science behind emotions; (3) Discovering how mindfulness helps to manage our emotions; (4) Learning useful skills to help ride the “wave” of emotion; and (5) Developing more compassion for yourself and others. More resources included in this workshop!
Debra Dalby, LCSW, RTY200 is a therapist in Leesburg, VA, with over 20 years of experience in the field of mental health. Her post-graduate studies include emotionally focused therapy, and post-traumatic stress disorder training.

L814 3D Printing: Why All the Hype?

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 18–Nov. 8
Four sessions
Instructor: John Acton

Is 3D printing just another passing technological fad or could it be a window into an exciting new future of technology that will change the way we live? We’ll explore the humble origins of 3D printing, its initial applications in prototyping and manufacturing, how the technology has evolved, and how it has recently expanded into a broad range of applications, the diversity of which will surely amaze us all.
John Acton, OLLI member and chair of the Science, Technology, and Health Program Planning Group, has a BS in electrical engineering and an MS in engineering management of technology. He spent 20 years in the US Air Force, applying advanced sensor technologies to critical national security missions, and afterwards, 24 years as a contractor supporting a variety of defense and intelligence agencies.

 

900 Other Topics

F901 Adventure Beckons! The Path to Your New Mental, Spiritual, and Fitness Future

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 26–Oct. 3
Two sessions
Instructors: Anne Drissel, Dave Lloyd

This seminar is intended to inform attendees of the opportunities and possibilities of living a full spiritual, mental, and fit life from mid-60s onward. Unlike most personal growth and career development seminars that focus on 16 to 60-year-olds, this two-session seminar and the associated workshop focus on those starting their fourth quarter of life who intend to live “the good life” to 100+ years.
The seminar addresses four fundamental ways to successfully negotiate this life phase: (a) fitness issues, (b) spiritual life issues, (c) intellectual life development, and (d) tips and practical practices to put these three pillars into place for success. (Note: Attendees should consider taking the associated workshop F902, “Finding Our Way: A Workshop on Self Re-Discovery.”)
Anne Drissel graduated from University of Maryland with a BS in family and community development. She retired in 2014 as a business architect in the Office of Biometric Identity Management, US Department of Homeland Security. She is a certified leadership coach (Georgetown University) and was vice president for Behavioral Health Services for a Texas regional healthcare system.
Dave Lloyd received his undergraduate degree in mathematics from Indiana University, an MS degree in computer systems from American University and Diploma Certificate from the University of Berlin. His career has been in a series of technical areas working both for the federal government and in private industry. His hobbies include mountain climbing and furniture building.

 

F902 Finding Our Way: A Workshop on Self Re-Discovery

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 10–Oct. 31
Four sessions
Instructor: Anne Drissel

As our lives evolve, we must adapt to change. The self that we were as careerists, achievers, parents, activists, or volunteers gives way in our later years to new opportunities. We are no longer driven by new titles, bonuses, winning soccer tournaments, or beating rush hour traffic. This workshop is about discovery. We will take time and thought to notice opportunities missed or not yet explored, and consider what once held us back. What would it take to pursue them now? Yes, there will be homework! We will notice, reflect, write, compose, create, and interpret. We will share some of our stories with fellow workshop members. Together we will help each other find that unique “Way” that awakens the Self we once knew. (Note: For a broader perspective on life after retirement, attendees should consider taking the associated course F901, “Adventure Beckons! The Path to Your New Mental, Spiritual, and Fitness Future.”)
See F901 for instructor information.

 

F903 Trip Tales

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 19–Nov. 7
Coordinator: Tom Hady

● Sept. 19: Portugal. Sue Roose traveled to Portugal with her granddaughter Ailis. They enjoyed lots of history and scenery, particularly in the Algarve area in the south.
● Sept. 26: Alaska. Elsa Little toured Alaska, including Anchorage, Fairbanks, and Denali Park.
● Oct. 3: Northern Italy. Patrick and Lydia Walsh toured Northern Italy for 14 days. Enjoy the romantic Lake District, dramatic Portofino and Cinque Terre, beautiful Tuscany, and canal-laced Venice. Savor gorgeous Italian scenery, spectacular Renaissance art, and of course, gelato!
● Oct. 10: Burma. Katie Mitchell takes us to Burma. Ride the Road to Mandalay. Visit the temples on the Bagan Plain and view life in the countryside: Markets, monks, pagodas, craftsmen and more—a traveler’s nirvana, a historian’s delight.
● Oct. 17: Tales of Three Cities. Dick Young will discuss adventures in Prague and Budapest, from Charles Bridge to Fisherman’s Bastion.
● Oct. 24: Italy. Alana Lukes wants us to travel from Rome to the Italian resort of Vieste on the Adriatic’s Gargano peninsula, and into the interior of southern Italy, through Matera and Alberobello to the western coast area of Paestum, Positano, Sorrento, Pompeii, and Naples, before heading back to Rome.
● Oct. 31: Southern US. Randall Scott takes us on a tour of Civil War plantation houses on Route 5 to Williamsburg, with stops at the Homestead and Greenbrier resorts as well as antiquing in Lewisburg, WV. On to Gatlinburg and Dollywood, TN. Then to Memphis and Graceland, followed by a four-night Country Music Festival and tour of Nashville.
● Nov. 7: South America. Nancy Fleetwood completes our fall tour schedule. In 2015 she and her husband, Carson, traveled to Ecuador to explore Galapagos. Then they went to Peru to see the Inca ruins and Machu Picchu. Along the way they swam with sea lions, visited the iguanas, and walked the Inca ruins.

 

F904 One Man’s Journey as a Caregiver

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Nov. 1–Nov. 8
Two sessions
Instructor: George Ewing

George and Doris Ewing joined OLLI in the fall of 2002. They attended the same classes with one exception: Doris attended the Poetry Workshop. In 2007 she began showing signs of dementia. With the help of two friends, George will discuss the ways he dealt with the various challenges he faced over the next seven years. His primary reason for sharing is to shed light on what can happen when a person has dementia.
George Ewing has a degree in group work education from George Williams College. He received a master’s degree from the University of Maryland in 1973.

F905 Gotta Sing, Gotta Dance, Gotta Style: Seniors Who Rock!

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 18–Nov. 8
Four sessions
Instructor: Michelle Blandburg
These four documentaries highlight seniors who defy myths about aging. The Young@Heart chorus delights audiences worldwide with covers of popular songs. It is a moving testament to friendship, creative inspiration, and reaching beyond expectations. Gotta Dance captures the first senior hip-hop dance team for the New Jersey Nets Basketball Team, from auditions to stardom. These NETSational Seniors overcome obstacles to unite as a team, as they perfect smooth dance moves and perform before 20,000 fans. Fabulous Fashionistas explores aging in style with six extraordinary women whose average age is 80. They share a determination to have fun, look fabulous, and dress with panache that belies their years. Over 90 & Loving It features people in their 90s and 100s living extraordinary and passionate lives. The subjects of these documentaries are people who live their lives to the fullest.
Michelle Blandburg is an active OLLI member who loves music, dancing, fashion and enjoying retirement to the fullest.

 

Fall for the Book.

951 Fall for the Book: Edith Maxwell, Mystery, Loudoun County

Saturday, 2:00, Sept. 24
Cascades Library
Edith Maxwell, Agatha Award-nominated mystery writer, is known for her “Local Foods” mystery series and the “Country Store” mysteries. Her newest title in the “Quaker Midwife” mystery series is Delivering the Truth, which follows Rose Carroll, an unconventional 1880s midwife. Library Journals calls Carroll “a strong and appealing heroine,” while mystery writer Catriona McPherson praises the historical setting as “redolent and delicious.” Cascades Library is located at 21030 Whitfield Place, Potomac Falls, VA 20165. Sponsored by Loudoun County Public Library.

 

952 Fall for the Book: Diane Rehm

Sunday, 6:30, Sept. 25
George Mason University Center for the Arts Concert Hall
Bus from Tallwood (45 minutes before start of presentation)
Diane Rehm
will accept the 2016 Mason Award, which celebrates authors who have made an “extraordinary contribution to bringing literature to the wide reading public.” William Miller, executive director of Fall for the Book, says, “The Diane Rehm Show has always fostered an appreciation for contemporary literature. In the midst of everything else going on in the world, Diane Rehm keeps a place dedicated to literature in the show each week. She’s given voice to writers and books over the years, in addition to being a writer herself. We feel her work and career perfectly exemplifies the Mason Award ideals.” Rehm was awarded the 2010 Personal Peabody Award for her more than 30 years of service in public broadcasting. She is also the author of four best-selling autobiographical books, including Finding My Voice and Life with Maxie. Most recently, she wrote the book On My Own, dealing with the death of her husband of 54 years. USA Today calls the book “stunningly honest” while The Miami Herald says it is “important…poignant.” Sponsored by the Fairfax Library Foundation.

 

953 Fall for the Book: Timothy Jorgensen, Strange Glow: The Story of Radiation

Tuesday 7:30, Sept. 27
Patrick Henry Library
Timothy J. Jorgensen
is associate professor of radiation medicine at Georgetown University. His book, Strange Glow: The Story of Radiation, tells the story of man’s experience with radiation and how we have been transformed by our interaction with it, from cellphones to x-rays to full body scans at the airport. In the book, Jorgensen seeks to demystify radiation, so the informed people can—as he says—“be masters of their own radiation fate.” Spectator Magazine calls Strange Glow a frightening, fascinating, inspiring story of radiation.” Patrick Henry Library is located at 101 Maple Avenue East, Vienna, VA 22180.

 

954 Fall for the Book: Kate Andersen Brower, First Women: The Grace and Power of America’s Modern First Ladies

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 28
Fairfax Lord of Life
Kate Andersen Brower
spent four years covering the Obama White House for Bloomberg News and is a former CBS News staffer and Fox News producer. Brower is the author of the New York Times bestselling books, First Women: The Grace and Power of America’s Modern First Ladies and The Residence: Inside the Private World of The White House. First Women is described as “an intimate, news-making look at the true modern power brokers at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue: the First Ladies, from Jackie Kennedy to Michelle Obama.” Sponsored by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.

955 Fall for the Book: James McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom

Wednesday, 7:30, Sept. 28
George Mason University Harris Theater
Bus from Tallwood (45 minutes before start of presentation)
James McPherson
is a Pulitzer prize-winning author and Civil War historian. His 1988 prize-winning book, Battle Cry of Freedom, sparked a new wave of interest in Civil War sites and research. McPherson has twice won the Lincoln Prize: once in 1998 for the book, For Cause and Comrades: Why Men Fought in the Civil War, and again in 2009 when he was a co-winner for Tried by War: Abraham Lincoln as Commander in Chief. The New York Times says of him, “Few historians write as well as McPherson, and none evoke the sound of battle with greater clarity.” In 2007, he became the first recipient of the Pritzker Military Library Literature Award for lifetime achievement in military history. Sponsored by the George Mason Department of History and Art History.

956 Fall for the Book: Claudia Kalb, Andy Warhol was a Hoarder

Wednesday, 7:00, Sept. 28
City of Fairfax Regional Library
In her new book, Andy Warhol Was A Hoarder: Inside the Minds of History’s Greatest Personalities, Claudia Kalb, health and science journalist, reexamines monumental historical figures through the lens of modern psychology, weaving together interviews with leading mental health experts, groundbreaking research, and historical records. Kalb examines Marilyn Monroe, Charles Darwin, Albert Einstein, and, of course, Andy Warhol. Author Edward Hallowell says the book is “a brilliant and fascinating journey into the perils that so often accompany genius. Spell-binding.” The City of Fairfax Regional Library is located at 10360 North Street, Fairfax, VA 22030. Sponsored by the Friends of the City of Fairfax Regional Library.

957 Fall for the Book: Billy Collins

Wednesday, 8:00, Sept. 28
Reston Community Center, Center Stage
Event limit: 20
“Luring his readers into the poem with humor, Mr. Collins leads them unwittingly into deeper, more serious places, a kind of journey from the familiar to quirky to unexpected territory, sometimes tender, often profound.” The New York Times. Billy Collins, United States Poet Laureate 2001—2003, is an American phenomenon. No poet since Robert Frost has managed to combine high critical acclaim with such broad popular appeal. His work has appeared in a variety of periodicals including The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and The American Scholar. He is a Guggenheim fellow and a New York Public Library “Literary Lion.” His last three collections of poems have broken sales records for poetry. His readings are usually standing room only, and his audiences—enhanced tremendously by his appearances on National Public Radio—include people of all backgrounds and age groups. The ticket price of $15 is payable at the time of registration, and registration for this event is on a first-come, first-served basis.(Refer to page 52 for “add to cart” instructions.) Sponsored by the Reston Community Center.

958 Fall for the Book: Donna Gunn, Discoveries from the Fortepiano

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Sept. 30
Tallwood

Musician Donna Gunn’s book, Discoveries from the Fortepiano, transports readers back to the Enlightenment, a time when music composed by the likes of Beethoven, Hayden, and Mozart mirrored the dynamic social changes of the era. Through an engaging visual presentation and solo piano performance, participants can explore and hear the revolutionary developments in this remarkable instrument, thereby heightening their listening experience of the classical style. Sponsored by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.

 

Additional Special Events

959 Status of Fear in the United States

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Sept. 16
Tallwood
Instructor: Peter N. Stearns
These days, fear is a pretty obvious emotional topic in the United States.This talk will focus on fear as a social and historical phenomenon, arguing that, while it is a basic emotion, it does vary depending not only on provocation but also on the prevailing culture. Taking a look at the measurable rise of fear in American society by the early 1980s involves assessing a major change that, in turn, helped produce the framework in which Americans have reacted to more recent stimuli. Have we become more afraid, and more diffusely afraid, than we need to be? If so, why, and what can we do about it?
Peter N. Stearns is University Professor at George Mason University. He has written or edited 120 books and published widely in modern social history, including Doing Emotions History. Forthcoming works include: The Industrial Turn in World History. He is currently completing A History of Shame for the University of Illinois Press.

 

960 Status of Fear in the United States

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Sept. 16
Loudoun
Instructor: Peter N. Stearns

This is a videoconference of 959.

 

961 The 2030 Roadmap: Greater Washington’s Economic Future

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 21
Fairfax Lord of Life Lutheran Church
Coordinator: Leo Brennan

The Washington region’s economy has undergone a major structural change since 2010. Coming on the heels of the Great Recession of the 2000s and just as the regional economy was moving into recovery mode, the region’s principal economic driver, federal spending, was curtailed. These cutbacks highlighted the fact that the region needed to diversify its economy in a way that reduced its historic dependence on federal spending and set itself up to compete globally. Recognizing this, members of the 2030 Group have long worked to advance the Greater Washington regional economy and advocate for a regional approach to long term decision making. Regional leaders across a variety of sectors—business, government contracting, philanthropic, health, tech, and academic—commissioned Dr. Stephen Fuller of Mason’s Center for Regional Analysis to create a roadmap for the region—one that identified the competitive strengths and weaknesses of our region, as well as non-federally dependent clusters that could spur economic growth and development throughout the region.
Bob Buchanan, a partner at Buchanan Partners, LLC and president of the 2030 Group, will provide an update on The Roadmap for Greater Washington’s Economic Future and the ongoing regional initiatives that have stemmed from its findings.

 

962 Caregiving Wisdom from an Ancient Sage

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 21
Rose Gallery, Reston Community Center, Lake Anne
Instructor: Veronica Li

This is a lecture on the Chinese philosophy of elder care and its relevance to today’s world. Confucius’ teachings on filial piety, the foundation of Chinese culture, contain nuggets of universal wisdom. Speaker Veronica Li will talk about her experience caring for her aging parents. As a Chinese daughter, she had been raised in the belief that she had to love and care for her parents above all else. After they passed away, she was haunted by questions. Had she done enough for them? And what was enough? Li wrote about her experience in a novel called Confucius Says. To put the story in cultural context, she read Confucius’ ideas of filial piety. To her surprise, Confucius says the first rule of filial piety is to take care of oneself. He also lays out the basic principles of caregiving. The ultimate goal of filial piety, he says, is to bring out the goodness in us.
Veronica Li, a resident of Vienna, VA, was a journalist and later an officer of the World Bank. She’s the author of Confucius Says, a novel on caring for aging parents, and two other books. There will be a book-signing afterwards.

 

963 Understanding the Nuts and Bolts of the Election Process in Virginia

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Sept. 23
Tallwood
Instructor: Cameron Glenn Sasnett

Although the necessity of participating in and the impact of voting is generally understood by most Americans, having a fundamental knowledge of how elections are administered in Virginia and throughout the United States helps bolster one’s civic awareness and appreciation of the electoral process. This course will outline the structure of the electoral system in Virginia, provide broad comparisons to other states, and provide insights into the legal and procedural requirements of election administrators. Areas of focus within this course will be who administers the election, absentee/early voting, polling places/precincts, election day, and post-election canvassing.
Cameron Glenn Sasnett is the general registrar and director of the Office of Elections for Fairfax County. Prior to his appointment, he served as a staff member at the Virginia State Board of Elections and Department of Elections. Sasnett began his election administration career in Stafford County as a special assistant registrar for technology, training, and site support. He has a BA in political science from Loyola University of New Orleans.

 

964 Cuba: A Land in Transition

Monday, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 26
Loudoun
Instructor: Raoul Drapeau
Cuba has suffered for many years under both an embargo and a repressive government. President Obama has begun to open the door for trade and travel. This talk, which is not a travelogue, is the

result of a recent trip there and will describe some
of the relevant history, culture, architecture, politics, and food, as well as the prospects for the future of that country, and the relationship between Cuba and the USA.
See R310 for instructor information.

 

965 Gilbert and Sullivan, Part 3

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 28
Rose Gallery at Reston Community Center, Lake Anne
Instructor: James Keefe

The Mikado was the culmination of Gilbert and Sullivan’s work, and had the most improbable of origins. Stuck for an idea for a new project, Gilbert was pacing around his home when a Japanese ceremonial sword fell off a wall. Inspired by the incident, he set to work and brought the story to Sullivan. The result is a comedy of errors involving mismatched couples, an angry emperor, Japanese legal arcana, and a resolution of Shakespearean symmetry. All of this is sparked by classic songs. Kenny Baker, of Jack Benny radio-show fame, stars in this 1938 Hollywood Technicolor film, along with the principals and chorus of the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company.
James W. Keefe, PhD, is a former choral music teacher, high school principal, university professor of education, and a national educational association director of research. He received an EdD in educational curriculum and research from the University of Southern California and retired from the National Association of Secondary Principals in 1995.

 

966 Come Rain or Come Shine: The Music of Harold Arlen

Saturday, Oct. 1, 9:30–12:00
Tallwood
Instructor: Dan Sherman

Best known as the composer of “Over the Rainbow,” Harold Arlen wrote over 500 songs for stage and film over fifty years. This course will describe Arlen’s long career and capture many memorable performances of his music, including some great jazz performances. This class will continue Dan Sherman’s tour of the Great American Songbook, which has included classes on Irving Berlin, the Gershwins, and Cole Porter.
Dan Sherman has taught many OLLI courses on a range of topics, including American theatre music and opera.

 

967 Overcoming Mental Barriers to Realize Your Full Potential

Monday, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 3
Loudoun
Instructor: Elizabeth Clor

Have you ever wanted something so badly that your own mind became your biggest obstacle? In this session, Elizabeth Clor, author of the book Boston Bound, discusses how attendees can identify and overcome mental blocks when trying to achieve a goal and reach their full potential. Using marathon running as the framework for the discussion, this session will explore ways to break through mental barriers. Clor will share her personal seven-year journey of overcoming anxiety and depression as she worked toward qualifying for the prestigious Boston Marathon. She will discuss how she identified her mental barriers and the steps she took to overcome them as she completely overhauled her mindset about running and her life.
Elizabeth Clor is an endurance athlete who runs competitively at all race distances from the 5K to the marathon. She holds a BA in English from the University of Virginia and is currently the head of marketing at a local technology company.

 

968 Music in the Life of President Lincoln

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 5
Fairfax Lord of Life
Coordinator: Ann Sica
Did you know that Abraham Lincoln frequently attended operas and was the first president to invite an opera singer to perform at the White House? Lincoln wasn’t just an omnivorous reader, he was also a music lover with wide-ranging tastes. The program will feature Music in the Life of President Lincoln, a film produced by the Virginia Chamber Orchestra. This 40-minute documentary film explores a little-known side of Lincoln. The production features the Virginia Chamber Orchestra playing selections from the operas, patriotic songs, spirituals, and folk songs that were Lincoln’s favorites. Other performers include the Grand Contraband Jubilee Singers and the Alexandria Choral Society. Public television’s Robert Aubry Davis narrates and also leads a filmed panel discussion. At the conclusion of the film, two experts will be on hand for a discussion moderated by Davis. Presenters are:
Betty C. Monkman, former White House curator and author of The White House: Its Historic Furnishings and First Families and The Living White House.

 

969 Alexander Gardner: An Examination of his Photographic Legacy

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Oct. 7
Tallwood
Instructor: Barbara Nelson

When Alexander Gardner emigrated to the United States in 1856, he had already apprenticed and worked as a jeweler, sold life insurance, had become owner and editor of the Glasgow Sentinel, and eventually worked as a photographer after seeing Matthew Brady’s work in the 1851 Great Exhibition in Hyde Park. In 1856 he started working for Brady in New York, specializing in large Imperial photographs. He opened Brady’s Washington, DC, studio in 1858. Gardner eventually debuted his own DC studio in 1862. He took more images of Abraham Lincoln than any other photographer, including the famous cracked-plate image taken in February 1865. He also took his photographic equipment to Civil War battlefields. Gardner was the only photographer invited to chronicle the executions of the assassins of President Lincoln on July 7, 1865. After the war, he went west to survey the proposed route of the Kansas Pacific Railroad, photographing the Native Americans and the remarkable landscape there. In 2015-2016, the National Portrait Gallery had an exhibit entitled Dark Fields, showing Alexander Gardner’s work, and this presentation includes many of those remarkable images.
Barbara Nelson, an OLLI member, taught for over 30 years at the secondary level, the last 20 at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology. She has taught a number of literature classes at OLLI. This presentation is based on her experience as a docent at the National Portrait Gallery.

 

970 Rise and Fall of Senator Joe McCarthy

Monday, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 10
Loudoun
Instructor: David Heymsfeld

In February 1950, Joe McCarthy, a little known senator from Wisconsin who had shown no prior interest in anti-communism, claimed to have a list of 205 employees of the State Department “known to the Secretary of State as being members of the Communist Party.” Although Senator McCarthy was never able to prove these charges, they made him a national figure. Over the next four years he maintained his prominence with a series of unsubstantiated charges, including calling the Roosevelt and Truman administrations “twenty years of treason,” accusing General George Marshall of being part of a “conspiracy so immense and an infamy so black as to dwarf any such previous venture in the history of man,” and claiming widespread communist infiltration of a number of government agencies. McCarthy’s downfall in 1954, after his condemnation by a Senate resolution, was as sudden and rapid as his rise. This presentation will examine these events in their historical context of fear and look at McCarthy’s “enablers.” We will also see videos of critical events in his downfall, including Edward R. Murrow’s documentary and Joseph Welch’s denunciation at the Army-McCarthy hearings.
David Heymsfeld, an OLLI member, served on congressional professional staff for 35 years. He has taught several OLLI courses on history and is a volunteer guide for the Newseum.

 

971 You Come Too: My Journey with Robert Frost

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 12
Fairfax Lord of Life
Instructor: Lesley Lee Francis

Come and hear Robert Frost’s granddaughter, Lesley Lee Francis, discuss the life and work of her grandfather, Robert Frost. Her book fuses scholarship on Frost with information from family letters and her own memories to provide a new perspective. Dr. Francis emphasizes the role of women–family members, editors and others who were influential in his development as a poet, including his mother Belle Moodie, his wife Elinor White, his daughter Lesley Frost, among them. She includes poems by many other poets besides her grandfather. You Come Too: My Journey with Robert Frost is available on Amazon.com as elsewhere. There will be a few copies available for sale at the event, and Dr. Francis will be glad to sign purchased copies.
Lesley Lee Francis received her AB degree from Radcliffe College and her PhD in Romance Languages from Duke University. She became a professor of Spanish language, literature and history at a number of colleges and universities. Having retired from the professional staff of the American Association of University Professors, she continues teaching, writing and helping to organize the annual Frost Symposium. She has lectured and published extensively on her grandfather; her biographical study, Robert Frost: An Adventure in Poetry, 1900–1918 is available in paperback.

 

972 Search like a Librarian: Introduction to Research Resources

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Oct. 14
Tallwood
Instructor: Patricia West

Are you researching for a book, preparing a course, following current events, or have an academic interest in any topic? If so, bring your laptop or mobile device and join this hands-on computer class taught by a George Mason University librarian. Here you will learn how to successfully conduct online research by surveying Mason’s hundreds of available databases and learn how to access articles in a wide variety of subject areas. As an OLLI member, you can access all the online databases in the Mason library, but you MUST have a Mason G number and an active Mason email address before taking this class. (They can be requested at any OLLI office and will take approximately three weeks to obtain.) You will also need basic computer skills.
The class will be taught by Patricia West of the George Mason libraries. She holds an MLIS from the University of Alabama and has many years of working with OLLI students.

 

973 America’s Atlas: The Leadership of George Washington

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 19
Fairfax Lord of Life
Coordinator: Velma Berkey
It was not simply by chance that George Washington was America’s greatest leader, although good fortune certainly played a role. Professor Peter Henriques examines the unique set of personality traits and variety of talents that enabled Washington to achieve success that would not have seemed possible given the obstacles he faced.
Peter Henriques received his PhD in history from the University of Virginia and is professor of history emeritus at George Mason University. He is the author of Realistic Visionary: A Portrait of George Washington. As a recipient of the George Washington Memorial Award from the George Washington Masonic Memorial Association in 2012, Dr. Henriques presented the Distinguished Lecture Series at Colonial Williamsburg. His latest endeavor is a work in progress, America’s Atlas: The Leadership of George Washington.

 

974 The State of the Arts: Insights into the University, Community, and Beyond

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Oct. 21
Tallwood
Coordinator: Velma Berkey

What role do the arts play in your life, in the life of your community, and the world? Rick Davis, who is starting his second year as dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts (CVPA), takes a look out the window of his new office, and what he sees is a panoply of vitality, along with some real challenges. This presentation “thinks globally and talks locally” about how the arts are contributing to the world around us.
Rick Davis joined George Mason University in 1991 to lead the Theater of the First Amendment and to teach in the theater program. He has held numerous other positions, including artistic director of the Center for the Arts, associate provost for undergraduate education, and executive director of the Hylton Performing Arts Center. Outside of the dean’s office, Davis is active as a director, writer, translator and occasional performer. Educated at Lawrence University and the Yale School of Drama, Davis taught at Washington College, and worked at Baltimore’s Center Stage before coming to Mason.

 

975 A Marvelous Party: The Music of Noel Coward and Cole Porter

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 26
Fairfax Lord of Life
Presenter: Luke Frazier and Friends

Enjoy a lively presentation by Luke Frazier, who is returning to OLLI by popular demand. He expects to bring along a guest singer or two to really spice things up!
Luke Frazier is the founder and conductor of The American Pops Orchestra. He holds an MM in conducting from Ohio University and a BM in piano performance from West Virginia University. He has given several presentations at OLLI in recent years and we’re delighted to have him back.

 

976 The Difficulty of Being Good

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Oct. 28
Tallwood
Instructor: Kamlesh Jain
Most of us spend our lives wrestling with day-to-day questions of right and wrong, and these either have no easy answers or remain unanswered. This presentation uses the lens of “Dharma” as practiced by some of the characters in the great Indian epic Mahabharata to evaluate and suggest solutions to present-day moral dilemmas. It is based on the book, The Difficulty of Being Good: On the Subtle Art of Dharma (2010) by Gurcharan Das. Dharma can mean virtue, duty, or law, but is mainly about doing the right thing. The Mahabharata is the longest epic poem known, with 100,000 couplets and lengthy prose passages. Its world of moral haziness and uncertainty is close to our own experiences as human beings and provides insights into ways of resolving modern-day moral dilemmas.
Kamlesh Jain has over three decades of professional experience, including positions with the federal government, universities in the US and abroad, major corporations and a non-profit organization. She has a PhD in business and management from the University of Maryland, an MS from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a BS and MS from the Indian Statistical Institute.

 

977 Hamilton: The Man and the Musical

Saturday, 9:30–12:00, Oct. 29
Tallwood
Instructor: Dan Sherman

Alexander Hamilton has always been known as a central player in America’s early history, but the smash Broadway musical Hamilton has focused new attention on the life and career of this fascinating individual. This multimedia course will draw on both Hamilton’s biography and it’s depiction on stage to review his accomplishments, discuss his relationship with Aaron Burr, and reflect on the accuracy of the musical. Participants may wish to read Ron Chernow’s biography of Hamilton and listen to the show’s soundtrack before attending.
See 966 for instructor information.

 

978 The Role of Religious Communities in Disaster Recovery

Monday, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 31
Loudoun
Coordinator: Mark Weinstein

What do you need to do in the face of a disaster and where will help come from? One essential sector of the community that provides support services in many forms is the religious community. After major disasters, when local supply lines are interrupted and vital supplies become scarce, local places of worship and other faith-based organizations often provide warmth, comfort, and life-saving resources. For the past two years, Claire Rubin has been working with Arlington County Office of Emergency Management doing outreach and workshops for all of the houses of worship in the county. During this time, she worked with the Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater Washington and the Catholic Diocese of Arlington to provide workshops for staff and lay leaders. She will share that experience in this session.
Claire B. Rubin, a social scientist, is an expert in disaster preparation and recovery. She is president of Claire B. Rubin & Associates, LLC in Arlington, VA. She has 38 years of experience as a researcher and consultant in the emergency management field at FEMA, EPA, and local universities. She holds a BS from Simmons College and an MA from Boston University.

 

979 The Importance of Trees and Forests in Fairfax County

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Nov. 2
Rose Gallery, Reston Community Center Lake Anne
Coordinator: Fred Kaiser

Trees and forests provide significant social and environmental benefits to our community, and, for over 30 years, Fairfax County has been raising awareness about their importance. Joan Allen, Fairfax County urban forester, will describe the ways Fairfax County is promoting the compatibility between the developed and natural communities through science, education, and partnerships. Topics include vegetation mapping and surveys, development of ordinances and policies for tree preservation, and the monitoring and suppression of insect and pest infestations such as the gypsy moth and the fall cankerworm.
Joan Allen is an urban forester for the Fairfax County Urban Forest Management Division. She has worked for Fairfax County for nine years. She earned a bachelor of science from SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry where she majored in environmental forest biology. She also earned a master of natural resources from Virginia Tech. In her free time she enjoys spending time outside hiking, camping, and exploring the area.

 

980 First-Hand Experience Meeting and Working with Syrian Refugees

Monday, 11:50–1:15, Nov. 7
Loudoun
Instructor: Barbara Crain

Professor Crain spent the summer and fall of 2016 teaching, meeting, interviewing and supporting Syrian refugee communities in Germany and Greece. What were/are their experiences, problems, hopes and plans? What were/are their experiences with the support provided by European governments, local communities, and other non-governmental organizations (NGO)? How do local communities handle the large influx of foreigners? Join us for the presentation and discussion.
Barbara Crain holds an MA in geography from the University of Heidelberg, Germany, and an MS in environmental science from Johns Hopkins University. She is an associate professor at Northern Virginia Community College. She has always been fascinated with people, their behavior and how these affect geography.

 

981 Commedia dell’ Politico

Tuesday, 2:15–3:40, Nov. 8
Loudoun
Instructor: Scott D. Pafumi
Theatre professor Scott D. Pafumi will present an interactive workshop on political comedy, using stories and characters from our 2016 presidential election. It will be presented through the lens of the classical genre of acting known as commedia dell’arte, an Italian renaissance art form. Students from the Loudoun Northern Virginia Community College theatre program will assist Pafumi in this presentation with a short one act play rehearsed for the occasion. Teaching, performing, and audience participation will be the main objectives of this interactive workshop.
Scott Pafumi is a veteran 20-year secondary theatre educator, having worked in both Fairfax County Public Schools and as an adjunct theatre professor for the Loudoun campus of Northern Virginia Community College. He holds a BA in theatre from Virginia Tech and an MA in arts management from George Mason University. His work with his students over the last two decades has included mounting over 60 theatrical productions of Shakespeare’s plays, modern musicals, and contemporary comedies and dramas. His productions have earned him local, state, and national recognition. In 2008 his theatre program was the subject of a two-hour special on ABC’s 20/20, airing a national documentary entitled Drama High: the Making of a High School Musical.

 

982 The Power of Books for Children, From Babies to Teens

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Nov. 9
Fairfax Lord of Life
Presenters: Jackie Gropman, Judy Braham, Ilze Long, Mary Alice Giarda
This session will explain why books matter to children and how to select the best ones for the children in your life. Children’s literature experts share some of their personal favorites and will give a wealth of professional insights. The discussion will address such books as Goodnight Moon and Ramona, and give practical examples of what makes a book memorable. Examples will also include board books, fairy tales, and graphic novels. This lively presentation will give you a new excitement about children’s books and the confidence to select them.
Judy Braham received her MLS from the University of Maryland in 1971. She worked as a librarian in the Kansas City Public Library for 4 years before coming to Fairfax County where she headed children’s services at several branches, including two regionals, the most recent being George Mason. Her commitment to literacy continues with her work as a volunteer for the Reach Out and Read program in Arlington.
Ilze Long received her MLS from University of Michigan in 1966. After holding several children’s librarian positions in Salt Lake County, she moved to Fairfax County where she served as head of children’s services at Fairfax Regional Library and Reston Regional Library. In partnership with the Fairfax County Office for Children, and with other librarians, she conceived of and produced the Kid’s Connection, a program to educate child care providers in the use of picture books. She retired as assistant branch manager at Reston Regional Library.
Mary Alice Giarda received her MLS from Catholic University in 1996 and found her true calling. She worked for ten years at Pohick Library as an adult reference librarian and as a young adult librarian. She made a significant contribution to young adult services, instituting the annual FCPL Job Fair for teen volunteers, and creating and facilitating a teen theatre group for the summer reading program.
Jackie Gropman received her MLS degree from Catholic University in 1986 and worked as children’s librarian in several Fairfax County branches before retiring as children’s services manager at Chantilly Regional Library. In retirement she writes book reviews for School Library Journal and is a member of Capitol Choices: Noteworthy Books for Children and Teens, which produces a yearly list of the best books for children.

 

983 OLLI’s Second Annual Veterans Day Celebration

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Nov. 11
Tallwood
Coordinator: Martha Powers

Last year we celebrated Veterans Day at OLLI for the first time, and this year we are continuing the tradition. We’ll kick off with the Fairfax Police Ceremonial Honor Guard presenting the colors and the singing of our national anthem. Then OLLI’s Poetry Workshop co-moderator, Col. Mike McNamara, US Army (Retired), will present a new poem composed especially for this occasion, followed by recognition of all veterans present at this event. This year’s movie is Arlington: Field of Honor, a highly rated 55-minute National Geographic documentary about The Tomb of the Unknowns, and the amazing dedication of the elite Army guards who watch over it. Please join us for this special celebration of OLLI’s veterans and our nation’s heritage.
Martha Powers is chair of the Member Services Committee, and she enjoys celebrating special events with fellow OLLI members.

 

984 The 2016 Presidential Election: Forces and Consequences

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Nov. 16
Fairfax Lord of Life
Instructor: Helen R. Desfosses

This lecture will examine the factors and forces that played into this extraordinary and absolutely unique presidential election. The role of many traditional factors, such as political parties, political experience, and policy discussions was diminished and even made suspect, while the impact of powerful personalities, unlimited campaign funds, political polarization, often unfiltered media attention, and angry nativism and populism, soared. Add to this mix growing economic inequality, and the decline of well-paying sectors like mining and manufacturing, as well as the significant disapproval ratings for many of the top candidates, and you have a tableau of how complex a presidential election this was. The consequences of this tableau, and frequently raucous complexity, will weigh on American politics for decades to come.
Helen R. Desfosses, PhD, is a retired professor of public administration and policy, a former elected official, and a consultant around the world on effective and transparent elections. She has taught several OLLI courses.

 

985 The Libraries at Mason: Yesterday and Today

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 21
Fenwick Library, Main Reading Room, 2001
Carpool
Coordinator: Kathryn Russell (Kathleen Kehoe)

In January 2016, Mason opened its newest facility on campus—the expanded Fenwick Library. Join us as Bob Vay, resident historian and library archivist, takes you back to the mid-20th century when the university opened its original campus library. As we walk through time, you’ll see the evolving role of libraries in university campus life, in research, and in academic scholarship. A tour of the new facility will offer perspectives on how the university planned and built a library for the 21st century. The presentation will be held in the Fenwick Library, Main Reading Room, 2001. Visitor paid parking is available in the Rappahannock River parking deck, the closest lot to the Fenwick Library. A map is available at http://parking.gmu.edu/GMU_FairfaxMap14_Parking.pdf. Unfortunately, paid vouchers are not available for this lot.

 

986 State Fair of Virginia: Bus Trip

Friday, 8:45–4:30, Sept. 30
Bus trip
Coordinators: Martha Powers, Stephanie Trachtenberg
Trip limit: 53

Where can you milk a cow, watch pig races, examine giant pumpkins, and eat every fried food known to man? The State Fair of Virginia, of course! The fair is held in Doswell (25 miles north of Richmond), and this bus trip promises to be a fun-packed day from beginning to end. Our “tour guide” will be none other than Virginia delegate (and OLLI member) Ken Plum, who will enthrall us with his Virginia travel experiences during the trip. You’ll be on your own at the fair—free to visit animal exhibits, special events, rides, and a plethora of shopping opportunities including t-shirts, tattoos, and Tupperware. If you’ve lived in our commonwealth for years but never have been to the fair, this is your chance to enjoy a taste of the real Virginia! The bus will leave promptly at 8:45 am from Fair Oaks Mall parking lot 57, outside the circular road in front of ManTech Corp. Please be on the bus no later than 8:30. The fee of $39, payable to OLLI within one week of enrollment confirmation, includes admission, bus fare, and driver gratuity.

 

987 Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Tour with Lunch

Friday: 9:00–6:00, Oct. 7
Bus trip
Coordinator: Jeri Mullarkey
Tour limit: 50

Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden enrichment was recently rated the fourth best botanical garden in North America by USA Today surveys. Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden offers year-round beauty on a historic property with more than 50 acres of spectacular gardens, dining, and shopping. The classical domed conservatory, the only one of its kind in the mid-Atlantic, contains live butterflies. There are more than a dozen themed gardens, and beautiful fall flowers should be in bloom for our enjoyment. Check it out: http://www.lewisginter.org/.
Our group package includes admission, guided tour, boxed lunch* in a reserved, semi-private dining area, and taxes. Lunch will be at 11:30 am followed by a
50-minute “Heart of the Garden” tour at 1:00 pm. The tour requires extensive walking, so please wear comfortable walking shoes. There should be free time before and after scheduled activities to see more of the gardens and to visit the gift shop. The bus will leave promptly at 9:00 am from Fair Oaks Mall, parking lot No. 57 outside the circular road in front of Mantech Corp. Please be on the bus no later than 8:45 am. The fee of $62 is payable to OLLI within one week of enrollment confirmation, and covers the group package, bus fare and driver gratuity. The bus will leave Lewis Ginter Botanical Gardens promptly at 3:00 pm.
*Boxed lunch package: Includes a sandwich of your choice, pasta salad or chips (chef’s choice), fresh fruit cup; brownies and beverage (12 oz. Coca Cola, Diet Coke, Sprite or bottled water).
**Please include yourchoice from the list below with your payment.
● Turkey and Havarti with cranberry relish on whole grain bread
● Tarragon chicken salad on croissant
● Honey ham and Swiss with dijonnaise on rye bread
● Vegetarian wrap with hummus and vegetables

 

988 A Wine Trip in the Fauquier County Countryside

Friday, 9:45–4:30, Oct. 21
Bus trip
Coordinator: Bernie Oppel
Tour limit: 25

Fauquier County will be the next venue in the continuing series of OLLI wine and luncheon trips to the lovely Virginia countryside. The trip begins with an extensive tasting experience at Philip Carter Winery in Hume. Our tour continues with a seated lunch at noted sommelier Neal Wavro’s new Field and Main restaurant in Marshall. The prix fixe lunch includes a salad, grain, two proteins and dessert, plus tea or coffee. After a short drive to Linden, the trip concludes with an afternoon of wine tasting and spectacular views of the Blue Ridge at Fox Meadow Winery. An all-inclusive fee of $110, covering bus, lunch, gratuity, wine tastings, driver lunch and tip, is payable to OLLI within one week of enrollment confirmation. The bus will leave promptly at 9:45 from Fair Oaks Mall parking lot 57, outside the circular road in front of ManTech Corp. Please be on the bus no later than 9:30. Estimated time of return is 4:30.

 

989 The Threepenny Opera

Saturday, 2:00, Oct. 29
Concert Hall at Center for the Arts, George Mason University
Coordinator: Florence Adler

This perennial Broadway favorite is a social satire sizzling with innovation. Based on the popular Beggar’s Opera, Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill’s Threepenny Opera echoes the spirit of the German music hall style and includes the popular “Mack the Knife.” The camaraderie and the sacrifices of war provide context for this humorous look at class warfare and sexual politics. This production is translated by Michael Feingold and directed by Ken Elston. The musical direction is provided by Dr. Dennis Layendecker. Tickets are $15, payable to OLLI within one week of enrollment confirmation.

 

990 Brothers at Arms: American Independence and the Men of France and Spain who Saved It

Friday, 1:00-2:30, Oct. 14
One session
Tallwood
Instructor: Larrie Ferreiro

The success of the War of American Independence depended on substantial military assistance provided by France and Spain, which saw their strategic interests align with those of America in the fight against England. At the time the first shots were fired at Lexington and Concord, the American colonists had almost no chance of militarily defeating the British. The United States had no navy, little in the way of artillery, and a militia bereft even of gunpowder. Without the extensive military and financial support of the French and Spanish, the American cause would never have succeeded. France and Spain provided close to the equivalent of $30 billion and 90 percent of all guns used by the Americans, and they sent soldiers and sailors by the thousands to fight and die alongside the Americans, as well as around the world. Instead of viewing the American Revolution in isolation, the real story is that the American nation was born as the centerpiece of an international coalition fighting against a common enemy. Dr. Ferreiro’s discussion will be based on the research done for his new book, Brothers at Arms: American Independence and the Men of France and Spain who Saved It, which will be available this November.
Larrie D. Ferreiro received his PhD in the History of Science and Technology from Imperial College London. He teaches history and engineering at universities in the National Capitol Region.

 

991 Iran and Iranian Peoples: Mithraism

Saturday, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 8
One session
Rose Gallery at the Reston Community Center Lake Anne
Instructor: Sheda Vasseghi

In a 1949 essay entitled “A Study of Mithraism,” African-American civil-rights leader and Nobel Peace Prize winner Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., writes: “that Christianity did copy and borrow from Mithraism cannot be denied, but it was generally a natural and unconscious process…to discuss Christianity without mentioning other religions would be like discussing the greatness of the Atlantic Ocean without the slightest mention of the many tributaries that keep it flowing.” This course will cover the definition of Iran and Iranian peoples before focusing on an Indo-Iranian divinity that is part of the Iranian national psyche—Mithra, the sun god, and for Iranians, symbolically associated with the lion-n-sun. Hence, the Iranian people are known as the Children of the Sun.
Sheda Vasseghi is a doctoral candidate and historian specializing in Iran (Persia). She has an MBA and an MA in history. She teaches at Northern Virginia Community College and is a longtime columnist at WorldTribune.com and Freepressers.com. She is an active history blogger on her website www.evakdat.com.

 

992 Beyond Sacred: Voices of Muslim Identity

Wednesday, Nov. 2, 8:00 p.m.
CenterStage at Reston Community Center Hunters Woods
Coordinator: Jennifer Disano
Beyond Sacred: Voices of Muslim Identity is part of an ongoing series of community-specific oral history theatre works known as the “Undesirable Elements” series. Begun in 1992 by Ping Chong + Company, each production is made by a specific community, with local participants testifying to their real lives and experiences. The script is based on interviews with the participants who then share their stories and truths in the final production. Since 1992, more than 50 productions have been made across the United States and abroad.
“…a lesson in human understanding, drawn from real lives… a probing and persuasive new work of interview-based theater” – The New York Times
Laura Collins-Hughes of the [New York Times] writes “The happiness that lit up the otherwise very serious face of a 19-year-old Afghan immigrant — a real person, not a character — in Ping Chong + Company’s Beyond Sacred: Voices of Muslim Identity, when he spoke of making his first American friend. This made me cry. How could it not?”
Tickets are $15. You will pay for your ticket when you pick it up at Will Call.  You must register by noon on October 31.

 

1001BT They Call Me Mr. (or Ms.) Liaison!

Thursday, 2:15–3:15, Sept. 15
Tallwood
Coordinator: Jim Dunphy

Are you an OLLI instructor or a curious OLLI member who might want to be a liaison? Then this session is for you! We’ll talk about aspects of liaising that are not so obvious, as well as ways to optimize the announcement reading. We’ll also discuss unexpected situations. Liaisons help make our classes the best they can be, and they give our non-OLLI-member presenters a warm welcome and a helping hand. Please join us for a participative discussion about how to be a great liaison.

 

1002BT Grab ‘n’ Gab Coffee Klatch

Wednesday, 9:30–11:00, Aug. 31
Fairfax Lord of Life
Coordinator: Martha Powers
Event limit: 20 After nearly six weeks without OLLI classes, it is time to see some friends and catch up at one of our casual coffee klatches. Grab a free cup o’ joe and a fistful of cookies, and join us for conversation and camaraderie. We will also have homemade oatmeal raisin cookies to entice you, so come early and join us.

 

1003BT AARP Smart Driver Class

Tuesday, 9:30–4:00, Nov. 15
Note time
Fairfax Lord of Life
Instructor: David Hall
Class limit: 45

The goal of the class is to help senior drivers in northern Virginia drive safely, longer. The class will review the senior driver as a demographic group, as well as the effects of aging. It will cover what one should know and do to drive safely. The course will also cover automobile and driving strategies, technology, new laws, and trends. We will address the question: “Should I be thinking about limiting my driving?” The class will utilize video clips, infographics, lecture, personal experiences, and relevant Q&A. An AARP guidebook and the latest DMV Rules of the Road will be provided. This class is approved by the Virginia legislature, which mandates an appropriate auto insurance discount for 3 years when a completion certificate is presented to the insurance company. The cost is $15 for AARP members, and $20 for non-members. Bring cash or check and your AARP card if you have one. There will be a very short lunch break; bring a bag lunch and snacks.
David Hall is a MIT graduate with a BSEE degree. He was with IBM for 30 years as an engineer and project manager on development of military, NASA, and commercial systems. He has taught project management in IBM World Trade, and conducted over 100 AARP senior driver classes over the last 12 years. Special interests are optical and cognitive functions as they relate to driving.

 

1004BT Bake Sale, Lunch, and a Movie: Joyeux Noël (“Merry Christmas”)

Tuesday, 11:30–3:00, Dec. 13
(Bake Sale 11:30–12:30, movie at 12:30)
Tallwood
Coordinator: Martha Powers; Historian: Bernie Oppel
Bring your lunch, buy some homemade goodies, and join us at noon for a half-hour of noshing and socializing, followed by a heart-warming seasonal film: Joyeux Noël. It’s 1914, and, as World War I rages across the European countryside, an amazing event occurs. This is the Academy Award-nominated French film (with English subtitles) about the unofficial wartime Christmas Eve truce that would offer hope for peace in mankind’s darkest hour. German, British, and French troops reached out to their enemies on the battlefield, greeted them with the simple gesture of a piece of chocolate or a cigarette, and put their differences aside long enough to wish their brothers a sincere “Merry Christmas!” After the movie, you’ll have a chance to explore this story’s veracity with our own expert on the subject, OLLI member and historian Bernie Oppel.

 

1005BT 9/11 Day of Service Project with George Mason University

Friday, 10:00–1:00, Sept. 9
George Mason University Campus
Class limit: 10

This is a community service collaboration between OLLI, the Mason Child Development Center (CDC), and Mindful Living LLC. OLLI volunteers will meet at 10:00 a.m. in Room G of George Mason University’s Johnson Center to check-in and receive their t-shirt. At 10:15 volunteers will walk as a group to the Mason Child Development Center. Half of the group will then walk the four-year-old class (ten minute walk) to Hanover Hall to make cards for serviceman and to play games. The other half will remain at the CDC, divided between the two-year-old and three-year-old classes, to make cards for serviceman and to play games. At noon, the volunteers at the CDC will walk to Hanover and reconvene with the rest of the volunteers and four-year old children.

There will be a “Thank You” lunch for first responders held in Hanover starting around noon. All volunteers are invited to partake in the lunch. The cards that the children made will be provided to the first responders at the thank you lunch by the four-year-old class and the volunteers.

Volunteers should park on the first level of the Rappahannock parking deck, right off of University Drive. They will have to pay an hourly rate of $3. There is also a small 30-minute parking lot right outside of Hanover if volunteers prefer to drive to the lunch instead of walking. In the event of significant rain, Mason will arrange transportation from the CDC to Hanover.

 

1101 New Member Coffee

Friday, 10:00, Sept. 23
Tallwood
Coordinator: Elaine Leonard

All members, but especially new members, are cordially invited for coffee, refreshments, and conversation. Here’s an opportunity for you to meet some of our instructors, staff, Board of Directors, and committee chairs. You’ll have a chance to get answers to any questions you may have, and to tell us about yourself and your interests. Registration for this event will be taken on a first-come, first-served basis.

 

1102 Grab ‘n’ Gab Coffee Klatch

Friday, 9:30–10:45, Oct. 7
Tallwood
Coordinator: Martha Powers
Event limit: 30

Grab a free cup o’ joe and a fistful of cookies and join us in the Social Annex for a casual coffee klatch. New members, old members—even board members are welcome! Make new friends, catch up with old friends, and enjoy the camaraderie that makes our OLLI so special.

 

1103 Oktober-Chili-Fest

Friday, 12:30–2:30, Oct. 21
Rose Gallery at the Reston Community Center, Lake Anne
Coordinator: Beth Lambert

OLLI’s Reston location has had many wonderful chili cook-offs over the years, and this year’s will have an Oktoberfest theme to help celebrate fall. Don your lederhosen, cook up a pot of your favorite chili, and join us for a feast topped off with a performance by the OLLI Players. We will also need corn bread, salads and desserts. When you register please let us know what type of food you’ll bring. For the record, if you’re bringing a crock pot there will be plenty of sockets available.

 

1104 OLLI’s BIG 25th Anniversary Party

Friday, 1:30–3:30, Nov. 4
Church of the Good Shepherd
Coordinator: Martha Powers

This is it – the big celebration of our OLLI’s first quarter century! We’ll have music by the Recorder Consort and the Tallwood Trio, plus more entertainment, prizes, surprises, and a special video on the history of OLLI. Come and have your photo taken with our gigantic green OLLI letters, and buy a copy ($25) of the brand new book, The History of OLLI, written for our anniversary celebration (while supplies last.) We’ll also be recognizing all the volunteers who make OLLI possible, so please come and get the round of applause you’ve earned. The menu will consist of dessert, dessert, and more dessert–a groaning buffet of delicious delights created by talented OLLI members.

 

1105 Annual OLLI Holiday Party

Friday, 11:30–3:00, Dec. 2
International Country Club, Fairfax
Coordinator: Elaine Leonard, Sandy Driesslein
Event limit: 200

The party starts at 11:30 am when the cash bar opens, and lunch will begin at noon. The Recorder Group will be playing as you enter the dining room, and after lunch the Readers’ Theater Group will entertain. The Tallwood Trio is expected to provide music throughout. There will be door prizes which are always a hit. Your entrée choices are chicken or pasta. The meal includes a salad, coffee or tea, and dessert. Registration will be taken on a first come, first served basis. You can indicate your choice of entrée and pay the $35 fee when you register. The International Country Club is located at 13200 Lee Jackson Memorial Hwy, Fairfax, VA 22033.

 

Ongoing Activities

Annex Art Club

Tuesdays
Sept. 6, 9:30–12:00, Fairfax Lord of Life
Sept. 13, Nov. 15, Nov. 29–Dec. 6, 9:30–12:00, Tallwood
Dec. 13, 9:30–11:00, Tallwood

Coordinator: Sue Goldstein                              ms.goldstein@verizon.net
All artists, whether you use pencil, ink, pastels charcoal, or paint, are welcome to finish or to start pictures. The group consists of OLLI members at all skill levels. Join us!

 

Bridge Club

Wednesdays
Sept. 7, 10:00–12:00, Fairfax Lord of Life
Sept. 14, Nov. 16, Nov. 30–Dec. 14, 10:00–12:00
Tallwood
Sept. 21–Nov. 9, 1:45–3:45, Tallwood
Coordinators: Susanne Zumbro         703-569-2750
Gordon Canyock           703-425-4607

Drop in and enjoy the friendly atmosphere of “party bridge.” Skill levels vary from advanced beginner to aspiring expert. Partnerships are rotated every four hands. The Bridge Club meets in the morning between terms and in the afternoon during the term. For details on the Club’s rules and bidding system, see its web page on the OLLI website.

 

Classic Literature Club

Fridays
Sept. 23–Nov. 11, 11:00–12:30
Tallwood
Coordinator: Bob Zener                         703-237-0492
Our selections for the fall term are Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children and Gabriel Marquez’s Love in the Time of Cholera. We will start with Rushdie’s novel. That novel is divided into three “books.” We recommend that persons attending our Sept. 23 meeting have read at least through Book One.

 

Cooking Club

Monthly dates to be determined
Fairfax Lord of Life

Coordinator: Ute Christoph-Hill                            utehill@cox.net
This is a club for OLLI members who enjoy preparing food and sharing hands-on, homemade dishes in a small-group setting. We meet during the day, sometimes in members’ homes and other times at Fairfax Lord of Life or alternative sites. We often have a theme for our meetings, but our format is flexible. We also participate in food-related events, such as ethnic cooking demonstrations and restaurant outings. If these activities appeal to you, please contact Ute for more information.

 

Craft and Conversation Group

Fridays
Sept. 2–Sept. 9, 9:30–11:00, Fairfax Lord of Life
Sept. 16–Oct. 28, Nov. 11–Nov. 18
Dec. 2–Dec. 16, 9:30–11:00, Tallwood

Coordinators: Doris Bloch                             dbloch50@hotmail.com
Pam Cooper-Smuzynski   pamcs2@verizon.net
We meet weekly to work on our needlecraft projects and to share product sources, expertise, and inspiration. Our ongoing conversations encourage camaraderie, and a group setting motivates us to progress with our current projects. Interested OLLI members are invited to join us to see what we are creating. For more information, contact Doris Bloch or Pam Cooper-Smuzynski.

 

Dr. Who Club

First and Third Fridays
Sept. 16, Sept. 30, Oct. 7, Oct. 21, Nov. 18, Dec. 16
1:00–3:00
Tallwood

Coordinator: Wendy Campbell                              neoblivis@earthlink.net
This new group is for those of you interested in Timey Wimey Stuff—we are meeting to watch Doctor Who on the “big screen” in a Tallwood classroom. We will follow each presentation with discussion. Some of us are new to “Who”; some of us are very long time fans. Everyone is welcome. We plan to view the Christmas Specials since 2007 in the fall term, starting on September 16 withThe Runaway Bride.

 

History Club

First Wednesdays
Sept 21 (note date), Nov. 2, 2:15–3:40
Dec. 7, 10:00–11:30
Tallwood

Coordinator: Beth Lambert
elizabethlambert7@gmail.com
We welcome OLLI members who are interested in discussing historical events or sharing reviews of articles, books, or other interesting historical topics. Our meetings feature speakers who present on historical topics ranging from the Silk Road through the present crises in the Middle East—and everything in between. The club maintains a list of books reviewed by members at www.olli.gmu.edu/historyclubbooklist.pdf. To receive emails about History Club meetings, contact Beth Lambert.

 

Homer, etc. Fridays
Sept. 2–Sept. 9, 11:00–12:30, Fairfax Lord of Life
Sept. 16–Oct. 28, Nov. 11–Nov. 18, Dec. 9–Dec. 16, 11:00–12:30, Tallwood
Coordinator: Jan Bohall                                   jbohall@verizon.netor 703-273-1146
Join us to read aloud a traditional or contemporary classic. We are currently reading Herman Melville’s Moby Dick. An extra copy of the book is available. Drop in at the Tallwood Annex any Friday morning. New members are always welcome. No meeting on Dec. 2 due to holiday party.

 

Mah Jongg Club

First and third Wednesdays
Sept. 21, Oct. 5, Oct. 19, Nov. 2, 1:30–3:30
Nov. 16, Dec. 7, 10:00–12:00
Tallwood

Coordinator: Liz Bateman
concordiaerb@verizon.net
We welcome all members who want to learn mah jongg or already know how to play. Stretch your mind and have fun with a game that is (maybe) easier than bridge, but definitely challenging! For more information, contact Liz or visit the Mah Jongg Club blog.

 

Memoir—and More—Writing Group

Wednesdays
Tallwood
Coordinator: Betty Smith

We meet most Wednesdays during the year, at or near Tallwood, except during the fall and spring terms when Dianne Hennessy King’s Memoir Writing class is in session. In addition to memoir, we write fiction, poetry, and personal essays. Writing groups have to stay fairly small and we’re full, but quite a few people want a second group. It needs a coordinator.Please e-mail Betty (address in the Member Directory)if you’re willing to do this minimally demanding job (no experience required) and you’ll get help in starting up.

 

Personal Computer User Group

Generally third Saturdays
Sept. 17, Oct. 15, Nov. 19, Dec. 17, 1:00, Tallwood

Coordinator: Mel Goldfarb                                   mgoldfarb5@gmail.com
In partnership with the Potomac Area Technology and Computer Society (PATACS), the OLLI PC User Group (OPCUG) focuses on Windows and Mac computers and software for enhancing our lives. Members and presenters also discuss smartphone and tablet apps across Android and iDevices, the Internet, digital photography, related technology, and open-source software. Our aim is to bring broad expertise about technology and topics of interest to attendees. PC clinics for members are offered twice yearly. Our target audience encompasses all computer users, from complete beginners, to intermediate amateurs, to experts. Our motto is “users helping users.” Club dues (currently $5 per year) are payable at the first meeting attended in each calendar year. Dues-paying members can view monthly sessions online via the Zoom cloud meeting service on a variety of devices from home or anywhere with an Internet connection. More details are available on the group’s website, www.olligmu.org/~opcug.

 

Photography Club

Second Fridays
Sept. 9, 9:30–11:30, Fairfax Lord of Life
Oct. 14, Nov. 11, Dec. 9, 9:30–11:30, Tallwood
Fourth Fridays
Sept. 23, Oct. 28, 12:00–2:00, Tallwood

Coordinators:  Angie Talaber                                        talaber@comcast.net
                              Dave Talaber                                        talaber@comcast.net
Meet with experts and others interested in photography and develop skills by participating in theme-based monthly photo submissions. The Photography Club welcomes all members, whether they use a basic camera or specialized equipment, and whether they are novice or experienced photographers. We discuss technical aspects of photography, as well as the artistic aspects of visual design. We have guest speakers on the second Friday of each month, and on the fourth Friday, workshops will cover specific topics in detail. We also regularly plan field trips in the local area. Contact Angie or Dave Talaber for further information.

 

Recorder Consort

Fridays
July 29, Aug. 19, Sept. 2, 9:00–11:30, Fairfax Lord of Life
Sept. 9, 10:30–1:00, Fairfax Lord of Life
Sept. 16–Oct. 28, Nov. 11–Nov. 18, Dec. 9–Dec. 16
9:00–11:30, Tallwood

Coordinator: Helen Ackerman                                      helenackerman@hotmail.com
If you have been part of the consort or have previously played the recorder and would like to expand your abilities, please join us on Fridays. There will be on- and off-campus performances, and you may need to purchase music.

 

Religious Studies Club

Second and fourth Fridays
Sept. 9, 12:00–2:00, Fairfax Lord of Life
Sept. 23, Oct. 14, Oct. 28, Nov. 11, Dec. 9, 12:30–2:30 Tallwood

Coordinator:  Steven C. Goldman
This club is designed to provide a forum for ongoing discussion and exploration of a wide range of religious topics. All OLLI members with an interest are welcome, including those of any faith tradition as well as seekers, secular humanists, agnostics, and atheists. The participants will shape the club’s agenda, format, and focus. No topic is too controversial or too off-limits for discussion. Some of the topics to be explored will include the following:
● What principles do religions hold in common and what are the differences?
● Are some actions inherently good or evil—or does it depend on the situation?
● How does one identify a “sacred text”?

 

Reston Book Club

Thursdays
Sept. 22, Oct. 13, Nov. 10, 2:15–3:40
United Christian Parish

Coordinators: Luci Martel, Nancy Scheeler
This is a book discussion club for OLLI members who find it convenient to meet on the OLLI Reston campus. The purpose is to focus on serious contemporary fiction, primarily—but not limited to—works by American or UK authors. We will avoid bestsellers and look for good novels on the long lists, short lists, and winner lists of the US National Book Award and the UK Man Booker Prize. We schedule our once-a-month meetings in September, October, November, January, March, April, and May during regular OLLI terms. Our selection for September 22 is Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff. On October 13 we will discuss My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante, and the selection for November 10 is A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler.

 

Spanish Club

Second and fourth Tuesdays (out of term)
Sept. 13, Dec. 13, 10:00–11:30
Second and fourth Wednesdays (in term)
Sept. 28, Oct. 12, Oct. 26, Nov. 9, 1:45–3:15
Tallwood

Coordinators: Dick Cheadle                            dbcheadle@verizon.net
                              Lois Lightfoot                          lelghtft@outlook.com
This is a relatively new club designed for those who are at the intermediate stage in understanding and speaking Spanish—further along than 1-2-3 and A-B-C, but not fluent. The club member leading a particular class will choose the subject and prepare the lesson for that class. Members will not have to participate beyond their comfort level.

 

Tai Chi Club

Saturdays
Sept. 10–Dec. 17, 10:30–11:30, Tallwood

Coordinators: Russell Stone                              703-323-4428
Susanne Zumbro                 703-569-2750
The Tai Chi Club meets every Saturday, year ‘round. It is open to all OLLI members.

 

Tallwood Book Club

Second Wednesdays
Sept. 14, Dec. 14, 10:00–11:30
Oct. 12, Nov. 9, 1:30–3:00
Tallwood

Coordinator: Ceda McGrew                        703-323-9671
Our selection for September 14 is Wild Ones by Jon Mooallem. On October 12, we plan to read Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates. The selection for November 9 is Finding My Voice by Diane Rehm. On December 14 we will discuss The Round House by Louise Erdrich.

 

Theater Lovers’ Club

Generally last Fridays
Sept. 30, Oct. 28, Dec. 16, 10:00–11:30
Tallwood

Coordinators: Norma Reck, Nancy Scheeler
The Theater Lovers’ Club (TLC) aims to provide OLLI members with opportunities to increase their understanding and knowledge of our local theater scene and the people who make it possible by:
● attending and discussing theater performances,
● hosting pertinent theatrical persons to speak at our monthly meetings; and
● pursuing interests as expressed by TLC members themselves.
Be sure to sign up for TLC when registering for regular classes/special events, and use the Add to Cart feature. This will ensure you receive TLC emails regarding meeting dates, and other TLC activities and events.

 

The Tom Crooker Investment Forum

Wednesdays
Sept. 7, 10:30–12:00, Fairfax Lord of Life
Sept. 14, Nov. 16, Nov. 30–Dec. 14, 10:30–12:00
Tallwood

Moderator: Al Smuzynski
For activity description see course F202.

 

Walking Group

Weekly
Tallwood/Fairfax Swimming Pool Parking Lot

Coordinator: Ute Christoph-Hill                   utehill@cox.net
When OLLI is in session, the Walking Group meets one morning each week, generally an hour before the first morning class. We gather in the Fairfax pool parking lot next to Tallwood and walk for about 45 minutes, arriving back at Tallwood in time for the start of classes. Because our goal is camaraderie as well as exercise, all levels of walking ability and speed are accommodated. The day of the week is determined by our schedules and the weather, so it may change from week to week. Between terms we continue to walk on a weekly basis, but for longer distances and at more varied locations. Contact Ute Christoph-Hill for more information.

 

What’s in the Daily News? Continued

Mondays
Sept. 12, Nov. 14, Nov. 28–Dec. 12, 10:00–11:30
Tallwood

Facilitator: Don Allen                703-830-3060
This is the between-term continuation of the discussion group for news junkies who can’t wait to express their opinions and discuss current events. It’s a small group, and the facilitator expects it to be self-moderating.