Phone:(703) 503-3384
 

Fall 2015 Catalog

Fall 2015 Catalog
September 21 – November 13

Below is a list of the courses, special events and ongoing fall 2014 activities at all three locations (Fairfax, Reston and Loudoun). Unless otherwise noted, classes beginning with an F are held at Tallwood in Fairfax, an R at United Christian Parish in Reston, and an L at Mason’s Loudoun County location in Sterling. To view non-course information in the catalog, click the following links for the Schedule of classes (pdf) and Registration Form (pdf). If there is an instructor for a course that interests you, please check our page of instructor profiles.

If you plan to print the catalog rather than read it on your computer screen, you may prefer to print the Fall 2014 Catalog (pdf) in its normal two-column format.

Class hours are 9:40–11:05, 11:50–1:15, and 2:15–3:40, unless otherwise noted.

100 Art and Music

F101 More than a Snapshort
F102 Understanding Opera (Part 1)
F103 Music Sampler101
F104 Fred Astaire, Entertainer Extraordinaire
F105 Drawing and Sketching Workshop
F106 iPhotography Revisited
F107 Singing for Fun
F108 Watercolor Painting
R109 The Ongoing Pleasures of Music
R110 Artists Working in Multiple Mediums
R111 Treasures of the National Gallery of Art – a Virtual Tour
R112 The :Poets of the Great American Songbook
R113 Meet the Artists
L114 The Beatles and Their Music: Growing Up Together
L115 Movie Matinees in Loudoun

200 Economics & Finance

F201 Navigating Lifestyle Changes Facing Seniors
F202 Selling Your Home, A Guide for Mature Sellers and Their Family Members
F203 Become an Intelligent Investor
F204 The Tom Crooker Investment Forum
F205 An Economics Potpourri
R206 Mythbusters and the Rational Investor
R207 Retirement Income Strategies
L208 Banks Before and After the Recession
L209 Understanding Economics

300 History & International Studies

F301 Russia and the “Lands Between”
F302 The Age of American Imperialism
F303 The British Side of the American Revolution
F304 Winston Spencer Churchill: Faithful But Unfortunate
F305 The Silk Road: Golden Journey
F306 Galileo’s Telescope: Science, Politics, and Religion in the Early Modern Period
F307 Travelogue on Virginia
F308 A History of American Politics
F309 Irish History: Fintan the Wise to Fianna Fail
F310 “The World Will Hold its Breath:” The War Against Hitler and Mussolini
R311 The American West
R312 Remembering My Hometown
R313 Their Day in the Sun
R314 Founding Fathers
L315 Issues and Politics In the Civil War
L316 The Serendipity of Life!
L317 China in Retrospect

400 Literature, Theater & Writing

F401 OLLI Players Workshop
F402 Readers’ Theater
F403 Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House
F404 Memoir Writing
F405 Let’s Study a Play Together: Almost, Maine
F406 The Sonnets of William Shakespeare
F407 Poetry Workshop
F408 A Tour of Hardy’s Wessex
F409 The :Poldark World
F410 Shakespeare Out Loud
F411 The Movies of Robin Williams
F412 From the Page to the Stage: The Crucible
R413 Northanger Abbey: Jane Austen’s First and Last Novel
R414 Gone With the Wind: An Iconic American Novel
R415 Shakespeare’s Master Magician
R416 Literary Roundtable
R417 A Novel for All Seasons: Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea
R418 Middlemarch
L419 The New Yorker Round Table
L420 Buddy Movies
L421 Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew
L422 Orson Welles at 100
L423 Writers’ Workshop: Writing the Mind Alive
L424 Readers’ Theater in Loudoun
L425 Old Time Radio in Loudoun
L426 Two by Forster

500 Languages

F501 Intermediate Spanish Conversation 2
F502 Beginning French
F503 Spanish Conversational Forum
F504 Latin II
R505 Intermediate Spanish Conversation, (Part 1)

600 Religious Studies

F601 Judaism, Jews and Jewishness: The Origins and Evolution of Varieties of Jewish Practice, Belief and Identity
F602 The Gospel According to Paul the Apostle
F603 How Jesus Became God
F604 “A Big Heart Open to God”: a Seminar on Pope Francis
F605 From God to The Afterlife in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
R606 Into the Light: An Introduction to the Fourth Gospel
L607 Three Existentialist Theologians: Martin Buber, Gabriel Marcel, and Paul Tillich
L608 Survey of Non-Traditional Beliefs
L609 New Testament Tensions

650 Humanities and Social Sciences

F651A True Colors: Self Awareness and Interpersonal Relationships
F651B True Colors: Self Awareness and Interpersonal Relationships
F651C True Colors: Self Awareness and Interpersonal Relationships
F651D True Colors: Self Awareness and Interpersonal Relationships
F652 Religions and Traditions in the Middle East

F653 Metaphysics: Reflections on the Nature of Reality
F654 Contemporary Issues in Criminology
F655 Chinese Cultural Perspectives
F656 Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?
L657 Family History Workshop
L658 The Nuremberg Trials
L659 Infectious Diseases, People, and Geography

700 Current Events

F701 What’s in the Daily News?
F702 Challenges and Opportunities Facing U.S. Foreign Policy in 2015
F703 Great Decisions 2015
R704 The Supreme Court: Current Cases
R705 All the News That’s Fit to Print
L706 Korea: North and South

800 Science, Technology & Health

F801 Science and Technology Today
F802 Magnificent Aircraft That Have and Will Impact America’s National Security Policy
F803 Advances in Healthcare
F804 History of Medicine: From Witchcraft to Robots
F805 Beginner Chen-Style Tai Chi
R806 Our Human Origins and Evolution (canceled)
R807 Geology: Our Dynamic Planet and Our Environment (Part 3)
R808 Gentle Yoga
R809 Tai Chi Chuan-The Eight Ways
R810 Gentle Yoga

900 Other Topics

F901 Trip Tales
F902 Refresher Bridge

 

Fall for the Book

951 Fall for the Book: T.J. Turner, Lincoln’s Bodyguard
952 Fall for the Book: Robert Poole, Section 60
953 Mason Reads: Ernest Gaines, A Lesson Before Dying
954 Fall for the Book: Keith Clark, On Ernst J. Gaines’s A Lesson Before Dying
955 Fall for the Book: Terry Alford, Fortune’s Fool
956 Fall for the Book: Tim O’Brien on the 25th Anniversary of The Things They Carried

 

Additional Special Events

957 “I’m So Glad We Had this Time Together”: A Tribute to Carol Burnett
958 The Importance of Bee Health
959 J. Edgar Hoover: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly
960 Japan-A Safe Haven for Jews in World War Two
961 Super Insulation & Solar Power
962 The Art of Storytelling in Sound: Sibelius’ 2nd Symphony and His Debt to Beethoven
963 Is Your Money Still Safe?
964 Good Leads on Good Reads
965 Gilbert and Sullivan Operettas-Part I
966 Ten Advantages of Aging for Psychological Health
967 Loudoun Election Issues
968 An Extraordinary Young Man: The Early Years of George Washington
969 Fibonacci: Great Mathematician of the Middle Ages
970 The Rise (Again) of Charismatic Catholicism and Protestantism in Latin America
971 More I Cannot Wish You: The Songs of Frank Loesser
972 An Afternoon [Wasted} with Tom Lehrer
973 The Greatest Musicals of All Time
974 The Greatest Musicals of All Time
975 The Greatest Musicals of All Time
976 Hello, Alice Faye, Hello!
977 The B-29: The Plane That Ended World War II
978 A Veterans Day Tribute: Honor Flight
979  2016 Presidential Campaigns: How Are They Shaping Up?
980 A Trip to the Legato School
981 A Visit to Montpelier, Home of the Father of the Constitution, Architect of the Bill of Rights, & America’s “First Lady”
982 Loudoun Wine Tour Redux
983 The Organ: The King of Instruments!
984 The Mystery of Tallwood House
985 Arthur Miller’s The Crucible
986 A Russian Journalist’s Perspective
987 Wine & Cheese Tasting
1001BT Remembering Ol’ Blue Eyes: A Sinatra Centenary (Part 3)
1002BT AARP Safe Driver One-Day Class
1003BT Beyond Happy
1004BT Beyond Happy
1005BT A History of Shame, and Why It Matters
1006BT A History of Shame, and Why It Matters
1007BT Current Transportation Issues in Virginia
1008BT Remembering Ol’ Blue Eyes: A Sinatra Centenary (Part 4)
1009BT You’ll Go Nuts for The Nutcracker! (Lunch, Movie, and Popcorn–plus a Cookie Sale)
1101 New Member Coffee
1102 Chili Cook Off
1103 It’s Not Just Reading the Announcements: Liaison Training for Everyone
1104 Annual OLLI Holiday Party

Ongoing Activities

Book Club
Bridge Club
Calling All Theater Lovers! (new)
Classic Fiction Book Club
Classic Literature Club
Cooking Club
Cottage Art
Craft and Conversation Group
History Club
Homer, etc.
Knitting and Needlework Club
Mah Jongg Club
Memoir-and More-Writing Group
Personal Computer User Group
Photography Club
Recorder Consort
Religious Studies Club (new)
Spanish Club (new)
Tai Chi Club
The Tom Crooker Investment Forum
Travel Club
Walking Group
What’s in the Daily News?  Continued


100 Art and Music

F101 More than a Snapshot

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Instructor: Dan Feighery
Class limit: 35
This course will help you make photographs that are more than ordinary. As opposed to discussing features of a particular camera, our emphasis will be on what is in the picture space and using your camera to record and interpret what you see. While the instructor typically uses a DSLR type camera, any camera you have is fine as long as you are familiar with its features. Each week we will complete a shooting assignment, bring a jpg photo from that assignment to discuss, and, as a group, offer some constructive comments. Assignments will include still life, nature, documentary, photojournalism, macro/ close-up, and other areas of interest to attendees.
Dan Feighery is a retired Air Force officer who has attended photography courses at Northern Virginia Community College and George Mason. He founded the OLLI Photography Club and has taught OLLI photography classes.

.

F102 Understanding Opera (Part 1)

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 21–Oct. 12
Four sessions
Instructor: Glenn Winters
This course offers a critical survey of the productions comprising the first half of Virginia Opera’s 2015-2016 season. Works discussed include Offenbach’s zany, satirical comedy Orpheus in the Underworld and Puccini’s beloved romantic classic, La Bohème. Audio and video excerpts will be used to analyze musical and dramatic aspects of these operas. This course is recommended for beginners and aficionados alike.
Glenn Winters has been Virginia Opera’s community outreach musical director since 2004. His adult education program “Operation Opera” reaches thousands of Virginians each season. He is the author of The Opera Zoo: Singers, Composers and Other Primates. His commissioned operas include The Empress and the Nightingale, The Princess and the Pea, A Trickster’s Trilogy and Deep River: Marian Anderson’s Journey. Winters has an DM degree in piano from Northwestern University.

 

F103 Music Sampler

Tuesdays, 9:30–10:55, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Note time
Fairfax Lord of Life
Coordinators: Kathleen Meyer, Kathryn Hearden

Kathleen Meyer, with Kathryn Hearden from the George Mason School of Music, will coordinate this course highlighting examples of the musical talent that abounds at George Mason. Each week knowledgeable and enthusiastic professors from the George Mason School of Music, often accompanied by their most promising students, will generously share their musical gifts with us in presentations that are varied, lively, informative, and entertaining.

 

F104 Fred Astaire, Entertainer Extraordinaire

Tuesdays, 1:45–3:45, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Note time
Instructor: Marianne Metz

Choreographer Jerome Robbins was asked by an interviewer, “Which dancers do you think are the greatest, and which dancers influenced you the most?” Robbins replied unhesitatingly, “Oh, well, Fred Astaire.” The reporter looked shocked. Robbins asked what was wrong. The reporter said, “Well, Mr. Balanchine just said the same thing.” In fact, it was a view widely held. Fred Astaire undoubtedly was one of the greatest and most influential dancers ever to perform. He also excelled at acting, singing, songwriting, and playing a variety of musical instruments. In this class we’ll be delightfully reminded of the many talents of this remarkable entertainer. We’ll see eight of his films in their entirety, including three with Ginger Rogers, and five with such co-stars as Rita Hayworth, Bing Crosby, Judy Garland, Cyd Charisse, Joan Leslie, Red Skelton, and Audrey Hepburn. As time allows, we’ll discuss Astaire’s extraordinary life and career, as well as the individual films. This class was previously given in Loudoun and now, by popular demand, comes to Tallwood.
In previous OLLI classes, Marianne Metz has shared her enthusiasm for Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Alice Faye, and classic American songwriters. She is co-chair of the Art/Music Program Planning Group.

 

F105 Drawing and Sketching Workshop

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Facilitators: Jonathan Korin, Therese Pung, Bill Parsons
Class Limit: 14

Participants with some drawing experience will explore techniques, materials, and ideas in drawing and sketching. Newcomers will receive individual assistance as needed. While some direction and instruction will be given, participants will be encouraged to exercise creativity and apply their own personal interests to produce work that is uniquely theirs, using whatever medium suits their drawing. Topics will include student suggestions from the Spring 2015 workshop such as: figure drawing, portraiture, explorations of color in drawing, perspective, and others. Projects will be started in class but usually finished outside of class. To help participants grow, there will be weekly class discussions of finished work.

 

 

F106 iPhotography Revisited

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 24–Oct. 15
Four sessions
Instructor: Stan Schretter
This course is structured for both new and experienced users of mobile device photography. While the techniques explained and demonstrated during this class are applicable to most mobile devices, the instructor will use the iPhone and iPad. He will try to answer questions regarding your Android devices.

  • Sept. 24: Introduction and Discussion of the Elements of a Great Photo.
  • Oct. 1: Creating Mobile Photographs With Camera Apps and Add-on Equipment.
  • Oct. 8: Editing and Optimizing Photographs On Your Mobile Device.
  • Oct. 15: Saving and Sharing Your Mobile Photographs.

Stan Schretter, an OLLI member, is an avid amateur photographer and has taught courses at OLLI for many years.

 

F107 Singing for Fun

Thursdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Instructor: Palmer McGrew

Once again OLLI’s choral group, singing in chorus and ensembles, will emphasize popular music, Broadway show tunes, and classic American songbook music. A great voice is not required, just a desire to sing for fun. There is no need to read music or even to have ever sung before. Gayle Parsons will accompany the singers on the piano.
Palmer McGrew, an OLLI member, has been a longtime performer in this course and a substitute instructor/director for the class. He sings in the West Point Alumni Glee Club, in barbershop harmony with the Fairfax Jubil-Aires, and with the Greenspring Village Choristers. He also co-directs the Choristers.

 

F108 Watercolor Painting

Thursdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Instructor: Leonard Justinian
Class Limit: 15
This class will provide an opportunity for watercolor painters at all levels to develop fresh skills while learning new watercolor techniques. Required materials include: #1, #6 and/or #8 round watercolor brushes; a paint palette for mixing colors; watercolor paper, 140 lb. cold press (Arches is best, but you can use less expensive paper); a kneaded eraser; a Staedtler white plastic eraser; tubes of watercolor paint in white, charcoal black, cadmium yellow (medium), cadmium red (medium), and ultramarine blue, or a starter set of watercolors.
Leonard Justinian has been painting for more than 60 years. Among other honors, he has received the Grumbacher Award. He teaches watercolor painting in his Fairfax City studio and is also seen on Fairfax Public Access Cable TV, Cox Cable Channel 10, and Verizon FiOS Channel 10. He is also a member of the Washington Society of Landscape Painters, www.wslp.org144.

 

R109 The Ongoing Pleasures of Music

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Instructor: Gloria Sussman

This music listening course has continued to live up to its promising title. We explore with pleasure the many facets of classical music with the use of DVDs and YouTube. You may sample the wide variety of previous terms’ musical offerings by searching for Gloria Sussman on YouTube.com.
Gloria Sussman has been teaching at OLLI since 2000 and continues to provide entertaining programs for OLLI at Reston.

 

R110 Artists working in Multiple Mediums

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Oct. 13
Four sessions
Instructor: Jeanne Loveland

Many artists create art using a single medium, but some artists work successfully to create art in multiple mediums. We will explore four famous artists who worked in a variety of mediums: Alexander Calder, Henri Matisse, Joan Miró and Pablo Picasso. Each session will include a short National Gallery of Art video about the artist. Then we will examine their art in various mediums, compare and contrast the work, and discuss the success of the various mediums.
Jeanne Loveland’s second career has been in the Education Department of Greater Reston Arts Center as Education Director and GRACE Art Director. She has been involved with the GRACE Art, their school art enrichment program, for 15 years, and the program still inspires her. Jeanne holds a BS in Architecture from the University of Virginia and an MBA in Finance from George Mason. She was formerly a Project Manager with the Peterson Companies.

 

R111 Treasures of the National Gallery of Art – a Virtual Tour

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 20–Nov. 10
Four sessions
Instructor: Adrienne Wyman Kralick

Museums can be overwhelming. They are just so big, and there is so much to see. Often, it is hard to know where to start. What are the “must see” masterpieces? Why are they so important? And, where do you even find them? Instructor, Adrienne Kralick has done the research for you. In this class, you can sit back, relax, and take a virtual tour of the museum without leaving your seat. Power point presentations will walk you through the museum. You’ll travel through time, exploring paintings in chronological order, unveiling why they were ground breaking or important for their time, and the ways they affected the next generation.
Adrienne Wyman Kralick received her BFA from Auburn University, majoring in graphic design and minoring in art history. She is an artist and oil painter who teaches oil painting with an emphasis on historical painting techniques. She has traveled the world visiting museums, studying and reading about art and art history. More information can be found at www.AdrienneArtist.com.

 

R112 The Poets of the Great American Songbook

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Instructor: Beverly Cosham

This class will introduce you to the men and women who are currently included or are soon to be included in the Great American Songbook lyrics. We will take a look at the lives and the music of Harburg, Gershwin, the Bergmans, Mercer, Berlin, Hammerstein, McBroom, and others.
Beverly Cosham (vocalist) has performed throughout the US and in local venues including the Kennedy Center, National Theatre, The Arts Club, Lyceum, Lisner Auditorium, Blues Alley, and The World Bank. As an actress, she has appeared on most of the stages in the D.C. area. She has received a Helen Hayes nomination and two WAMA (Washington Area Music Award) nominations. Ms. Cosham, a 47–year resident of Reston, was a founding member of the Reston Chorale and the Reston Community Players. She currently serves as chair of The Reston Community Center Board of Governors, and as president of the Reston Community Orchestra.

 

R113 Meet the Artists

Thursdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 24–Oct. 29
Six sessions (concerts)
CenterStage, Reston Community Center Hunters Woods
Coordinator: Rosemary McDonald

  • Sept. 24: Beverly Cosham and Friends. Ms. Cosham is one of the Washington area’s most popular cabaret singers and actresses and has won many awards for both. Her concerts include music across the generations and are entertaining and pleasing to audiences of all ages.
  • Oct. 1: Dr. Anna Balakerskaia. An Afternoon with the Piano: Solo and Ensemble Masterworks. Dr. Balakerskaia, professor of music at George Mason, earned her doctorate in piano performance, pedagogy, and chamber music from the State Conservatory in St. Petersburg, Russia. She will appear with her gifted students in this concert. She is a founding member of the “Ensemble da Camera of Washington.”
  • Oct. 8: Evelyn Mo, 16, piano prodigy, attends Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, and currently studies with John O’Conor at Shenandoah Conservatory of Music. Evelyn has won top prizes in many competitions for young pianists. She also plays violin and is co-concertmaster at the American Youth Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra. In addition she has received recognition for her writing ability and expertise in math.
  • Oct. 15: The Phoenix Woodwinds Quintet. Rosalie Morrow, flute; Jane Hughes, oboe; Allen Howe, clarinet; Bill Jokela; bassoon, and Ako Shiffer, French horn; will play a varied program from the woodwind quintet literature featuring the Quintet in E flat Major by Joseph Reicha.
  • Oct. 22: Klasinc and Loncar Classical Guitar Duo. The husband and wife duo have performed throughout Europe and the United States. This is their third appearance, to popular acclaim, for “Meet the Artists.” They will perform selections from the classical guitar repertoire.
  • Oct. 29: Sliders Quartet. Sliders is four guys who love singing barbershop harmony for the sheer fun of it. Paul Greiner, tenor; Ray Hawn, leader; Clint Burnham, baritone; and Mike Everard, bass, are all members of a daytime chorus: The Harmony Heritage Singers of the Mount Vernon Virginia Chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society.

 

L114 The Beatles and Their Music: Growing Up Together

Thursdays, 11:501:15, Sept. 24–Oct. 1
Two sessions
Instructor: Nancy Riley
Let’s take a look at the Beatles, from their beginning as a skiffle band, through their rise to superstardom, to their breakup. We’ll explore their music and how it evolved as John, Paul, George and Ringo underwent inevitable changes in their lives over the years.
Nancy Riley holds a BA in Russian from Rutgers University. She has also worked in the field of education, mostly with special-needs students. Music has been a constant in her life; she made her stage debut at the age of four, and since then has spent many decades as a chorister, ensemble singer, and soloist. Currently, she is a long-time member of the Reston Chorale and is a vocalist with OLLI’s Tallwood Trio.

 

L115 Movie Matinees in Loudoun

Thursdays, 1:45–3:45, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Note time
Coordinator Len Blistein

Following the success of Broadway at OLLI, join us in Loudoun for a series of great movies of all types. Each class will include a background summary of the show, followed by the full-length production. The shows that will be presented will include The Maltese Falcon, Casablanca, A Star Is Born, Moulin Rouge!, Phantom of the Opera (musical), The Producers (1967 with Zero Mostel), De-lovely, and one more. Our presenters will include long-time OLLI members Barbara and Len Blistein, Conrad Geller, and Karen Carter.

 

200 Economics and Finance

F201 Navigating Lifestyle Changes Facing Seniors

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 22–Oct. 13
Four sessions
Coordinator: Leo Brennan
This four-part series addresses caregiving options and solutions, legal and financial considerations, and how to organize your life and family to meet these concerns. Using a case study in all sessions, J.Michael May, financial planner and frequent presenter at OLLI, will moderate discussions on caregiving. He will be assisted by legal and financial planning experts who will focus on a broad range of problems faced by seniors and then discuss potential solutions.

  • Sept. 22: Megan Descutner, Gerontology Care Manager, will discuss the critical role of a care manager in evaluating the family situation, and the various caregiving options, and areas of expertise that might be recommended in developing appropriate solutions for families.
  • Sept. 29: Peggy O’Reilly, certified elder law attorney, will address the changing kaleidoscope of health care rules and regulations, highlighting some of the issues her clients face. She will also discuss the myths and realities of long-term care coverage as it pertains to Medicare and Medicaid.
  • Oct. 6: Caregiving Concerns. A panel of experts including: Sandra Fields, of The Crossings at Chantilly, a full continuum senior housing facility; Scott Maguire, non-medical in-home care and assisted living placement; and Helen Flynn, seniors’ real estate specialist, will address issues, using the case study, from the perspective of their field of expertise.
  • Oct. 13: J. Michael May will address key financial issues from both the case study and those facing his clients while providing a broad range of potential solutions drawn from his daily practice.

 

F202 Selling Your Home, A Guide for Mature Sellers and Their Family Members

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 20–Nov. 10
Four sessions

Instructor: Helen Flynn
Selling a house one has lived in for 15 or 20 years is a major event and an overwhelming task. There are emotional, physical, spiritual, financial, and social ramifications. And it comes at a point in life when one’s physical and/or emotional strength may be depleted. The purpose of this course is to provide information and guidance for individuals and family members facing this major undertaking and life challenge. Topics include: knowing when it is time to move, options for living, what to do with “the stuff,” legal and financial issues related to selling and estates, and dispersion of funds. Helen Flynn will be joined by experts in move management, elder law and finance.
Helen Flynn is a Realtor® with Century 21 New Millennium at One Loudoun. She has an MA in Education and Social Work and brings a unique perspective to real estate because of her background as an educator and psychotherapist. She specializes in helping mature sellers with one of their major life decisions by helping to minimize confusion and anxiety.

 

F203 Become an Intelligent Investor

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 23–Oct. 14
Four sessions
Instructor: Fred Rockwell

This capstone course teaches the fundamentals of evaluating investments by taking a look under the hood at what analysts and brokers do on Wall Street. We will discuss what moves the price of stocks or bonds and how to arrive at a value before you invest. This class is right for anyone who is invested in the market and would like a better understanding of the dynamics at play.

  • Sept. 23: To set the stage for this course, this session will focus on what it means to buy a share of business, not a stock, with discussions on Mr. Market, why “The Street” often gets it wrong, and navigating Security Exchange Commission filings
  • Sept. 30: This class will provide an understanding of important metrics used when evaluating a company. We will learn about Free Cash Flow and why you should always follow the money. We will also discuss “Porter’s 5 Forces” and take a look at leading financial indicators, what they mean, where to find them, and how to use them in your analysis. Debt/leverage and “free cash flow,” as used by successful analysts, will be discussed in detail.
  • Oct. 7: This session will focus on finding an informational advantage, where to look for it and how to decipher what you hear and read; how to use information in front of you to become and investor.
  • Oct. 14: Time to bring it together and determine a valuation. We will go way beyond just the P/E metric and discuss the pros and cons of various valuation methods and how to apply them. What works in one industry will not necessarily work with another.
    Fred Rockwell is a native of Virginia and has +12 years of industry experience. He is the President of Tarsier Capital. Before founding Tarsier, Rockwell held a senior position at Catalyst Mutual Funds. He is a Chartered Financial Analyst, Certified Public Accountant, and a University of Michigan MBA.

 

F204 The Tom Crooker Investment Forum

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 23–Nov. 11
Fairfax Lord of Life
Moderator: Al Smuzynski
The Investment Forum, which meets weekly throughout the year, addresses investment topics of particular interest to retirees. A weekly agenda is distributed, and each session begins with open discussion of recent events in the economy, in financial markets, and their impact on investment decisions. Member presentations typically include topics such as recent market indicators, stocks, bonds, funds (mutual, exchange-traded, and closed-end), REITS, options, commodities, master limited partnerships, sectors, allocations and investment strategies. We use analyses and data from the financial press. The forum website http://www.olligmu.org/~finforum/ includes agendas, and articles of interest submitted by members.
Al Smuzynski is a retired bank regulator and an advocate of affordable housing. He currently serves on the boards of Virginia Community Capital and Community Capital Bank of Virginia.

 

F205 An Economics Potpourri

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Church of the Good Shepherd
Coordinator: Leo Brennan
We are again fortunate to have a multi-talented team of George Mason economists return to OLLI. In the complex global economy of this century, today’s economists delve into a wide array of research topics both in traditional sense and in areas seldom considered in the past. Professor Lawrence White will kick off this series with a presentation on “Bitcoins,” a concept that we have all heard about but few understand. Ever popular Dan Houser, Chair of the Economics Department, will finish the series with a subject of his choice. In between, new and familiar faces will challenge our opinions, beliefs, and concerns on a variety of subjects. Prepare to be intrigued, provoked, dazzled, and enlightened on topics that we may seldom consider in economic terms. Speakers include:

  • Sept. 24: Lawrence White
  • Oct. 1: Johanna Mollerstrom
  • Oct. 8: Noel Johnson
  • Oct. 15: Dan Klein
  • Oct. 22: David Eil
  • Oct. 29: John Nye
  • Nov. 5: Thomas Stratmann
  • Nov. 12: Dan Houser

 

R206 Mythbusters and the Rational Investor

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Oct. 13
Four sessions
Instructor: David F. Wirth
This interactive two-part course, presented over four sessions, examines common myths that investors have come across in their financial lives, as well as a serious but entertaining look at the undeniable impact of our human emotions and behaviors on investing. The material will be presented objectively with examples and illustrations. There will be case studies, breakout sessions and opportunities to share experiences.
Part one: The myths, such as “Cash is safe,” “Buy funds with winning records,” and “Drawing income from IRAs before you must is wrong.”
Part two: Insight into Behavioral Finance. The study of human behavior is hardly new, but the interpretation and evaluation of its impact on investing is quickly growing. Through the use of physiological data, and real-world examples of how being human impacts financial decisions, we will seek to better understand not only the importance of acknowledging this reality but also discuss what, if anything, can be done about it.
David F. Wirth, CFP, is a financial advisor for Savant Capital Management in McLean, VA. He graduated from the University of South Florida with a BA in Economics and Sociology and obtained his Certificate in Financial Planning from the College for Financial Planning in Denver, CO. David has nineteen years’ experience in financial and investment planning and has spoken over the years to many groups, including business groups, college students, and retirees.

 

R207 Retirement Income Strategies

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 27–Nov. 3
Two sessions
Instructor: Linda Black

During retirement, it continues to be vitally important to manage your portfolio and mitigate risks to your investments and income. This two-session course will address investment and retirement income strategies that are practical, relevant, and current. Topics will include asset management, Social Security options, taxes and estate planning considerations.
Linda Black, a chartered financial counselor, chartered retirement planning counselor, and retirement income chartered professional, has extensive experience counseling clients on portfolio construction, retirement issues, estate planning, and asset protection strategies.

 

L208 Banks Before and After the Recession

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 20–Nov. 10
Four sessions
Instructors: Al Smuzynski, Kevin O’Connell

This course will look at the recession of 2008, caused largely by the collapse of housing values, and how it changed the banking industry.

  • Oct. 20: “Banking 101.” We will look at the financial services industry, of which banks are a part, and the basics of banking, including bank balance sheets, how banks make (or lose) money, bank capital and regulation.
  • Oct. 27 and Nov. 3: We will look at the 2008 recession, and the government policies encouraging homeownership. This resulted in excesses culminating in the collapse of housing values, millions of foreclosures, and an economic recession. We will also look at the savings and loan crisis in the 1980s, and compare it to the 2008 crisis.
  • Nov. 10: How has the banking industry changed, and what is the impact of Dodd-Frank, the legislation created in response to the 2008 recession?

Al Smuzynski and Kevin O’Connell are retired savings and loan regulators who were heavily involved with the savings and loan crisis in the 1980s. Al has been an OLLI member since 2007, and moderator of the Tom Crooker Investment Forum. Al and Kevin have previously taught OLLI courses on banking issues.

 

L209 Understanding Economics

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 22–Nov. 12
Four sessions
Instructor: Stephen Canner
This course is designed for people who never took economics in college or who did but never quite got it. We will cover topics such as how markets set prices, why markets are not always right in setting prices, why nations trade and invest, as well as factors that drive economic growth and job creation. There will be recommended outside readings to complement the class discussion.
Stephen Canner has a PhD in economics,and served 28 years in the Department of the Treasury, International Affairs, and 18 years at the US Council for International Business.

 

300 History and International Studies

F301 Russia and the “Lands Between”

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Instructor: Bernie Oppel

Modern Russia owes as much to its traditional institutions and cultures as to the Soviet regime of the 20th century. The Central European “lands between” have demonstrated a remarkable capacity for survival in the face of constant and often corrosive outside pressures. In the 19th and 20th centuries, traditional regimes and societies of Russia and Central Europe experienced rapid and dynamic change brought about by new forces of nationalism, industrialization, urbanization, democracy, and socialism. This course examines and analyzes the restraints imposed on traditional Russian institutions by modern and external forces, as well as the interaction and response of Central European peoples to these forces and to the successive regimes of major powers in the area. The course incorporates class discussion in a lecture format.
Bernie Oppel, OLLI member, is a retired Foreign Service Officer and retired Air Force colonel. He holds a PhD in modern European/Russian history from Duke University. He has taught history at the USAF Academy, as well as several history and history film courses at OLLI.

 

F302 The Age of American Imperialism

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Instructor: Patrick McGinty
From the end of the Civil War until the 1880s, the indifference of most Americans to the outside world was almost unbelievable. But then, in the sunset decades of the nineteenth century, a momentous shift occurred in US foreign policy. In a few short years the US had fought the Spanish American War; acquired Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam and the Philippines; joined other nations in suppressing the Boxers in China; crushed an insurrection in the Philippines; and built the Panama Canal. In 1916 as the country teetered on entering the World War, the US had intervened in Mexico, Cuba (twice), Nicaragua (twice) and Haiti. Come join us as we review these historical events and examine the political, social, economic, and psychological factors responsible for causing this dramatic shift in the national attitude.
Patrick McGinty, an OLLI member, is a retired naval officer with an MA and PhD in history from Georgetown University. He has taught various history courses at University of Maryland University College.

 

F303 The British Side of the American Revolution

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Oct. 13
Four sessions
Instructor: Beth Lambert
There are two sides to every story, but have we ever looked at the American Revolution from the other side? Have we ever questioned the motives of the American patriots, as well as King George and Parliament? Have we ever wondered why at least a third of the colonists remained loyal to the Crown? Are we aware that a significant number of slaves and Native Americans fought on the side of the British—and had good reasons for doing so? In these four sessions we will view the American Revolution from the other side of the pond.
Beth Lambert is a retired professor of English at Gettysburg College, where she taught courses on all aspects of the 18th century. Her biography of Edmund Burke was published by the University of Delaware Press.

 

F304 Winston Spencer Churchill: Faithful But Unfortunate

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 20–Nov. 10
Four sessions
Instructor: Doug Hottel
Winston Spencer Churchill (1874-1965) was a controversial figure long before he became Britain’s WW2 Prime Minister. His life was one of extremes, including periods of public adoration and also universal condemnation. Descended from the Duke of Marlborough, he was a troubled student, widely-read correspondent, adventure-seeking soldier, prolific author, and politician. As such he was appointed to a broad spectrum of government positions with unpredictable results. This four-part course will review, from many different sources, the ups and downs of his tumultuous life before 1940. Hang onto your seats as we examine the man who was called “the last Victorian.”
Douglas W. Hottel has been an OLLI member since 2010 and this is the sixth course he has taught. Douglas received a BA in history/political science from Bethany College, an MA in international affairs from the Catholic University of America, and an MA in national security and strategic studies from the US Naval War College.

 

F305 The Silk Road: Golden Journey

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 20–Nov. 10
Four sessions
Instructor: Robert Springer
Class limit: 45
The Silk Road is a historic system of overland trade routes linking the Orient and Europe for 1,500 years. Opening during the Han Dynasty in China and the Roman Era in Europe, it provided the primary contact between the East and the West. It is the route traveled by merchants, explorers, priests, monks, missionaries, soldiers, adventurers, scholars, and all manner of humanity such as Marco Polo, Alexander the Great, Genghis Khan, Rudyard Kipling, and Winston Churchill. The great camel caravans brought valuable cargo such as silk, spices and jewels, as well as ideas, inventions and religions that changed the world. The course will begin with a general overview of the Silk Road, followed by discussions of a number of special topics related to China, Central Asia, and the Middle Eastern Countries which the route passed through. These include:

  • Syria, Lebanon, Jordan: Traveling ancient routes, today and yesterday, including Petra. Time permitting, we also will discuss damage to the sites in the current conflicts.
  • The “Great Game,” the 19th Century contest between Russia and Great Britain for the control of central Asia.
  • Greek, Buddhist, and other art along the Silk Road.

Robert Springer, Professor Emeritus American University. After an Army career, he joined the faculty and was a teacher and department chairman for many years. He earlier taught in programs for Loyola University and the Universities of Hawaii and Utah. Later, he was a consultant and program director at the Institute for Defense Analysis.

 

F306 Galileo’s Telescope: Science, Politics, and Religion in the Early Modern Period

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Instructor: Nick Timreck
The scientific revolution was one of the most significant events in the early modern period. Indeed, some historians of science claim it was the single most transformative moment in the history of science. Other historians refute this assumption. This course will examine the origins of modern science and the ways in which science, politics, and religion intersected to shape Western culture. This will be a lecture style course with no assigned readings, but hopefully, it will provide an engaging and thought provoking opportunity for discussion.
Nick Timreck is an OLLI instructor and an academic assistant in the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics at George Mason University. He holds an MA in US history from George Mason.

 

 

F307 Travelogue on Virginia

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 21–Nov. 11
Four sessions
Instructor: Ken Plum
Take a classroom visit to all regions of Virginia with the longest currently serving member of the House of Delegates and native of the Commonwealth, Delegate Ken Plum. He will suggest places to visit, provide some history, and narrate folk tales. He will also describe local cultures and give a calendar of year-round events. Whatever your interests, you can pursue them in Virginia with Ken’s help. Classroom lectures, discussion, and travel materials will be included.
Delegate Ken Plum is one of the founders of OLLI and a popular leader of courses on Virginia’s history and government. He is a native Virginian who holds degrees from Old Dominion University and the University of Virginia His weekly commentary appears in a local newspaper, and in his electronic newsletter, Virginia E-News.

 

F308 A History of American Politics

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Instructor: William Reader
This course will discuss the emergence of political factions among governing elites in America, the attitudes of the founding fathers toward “factions” and political parties, why a two-party system rather than a multi-party system emerged in America, the factors that led to the emergence (and decline) of specific parties, and the history of American political parties from the American Revolution to the present. Interwoven with these basic issues are questions as to how the Constitution, electoral laws, political philosophies, policy differences, immigration, social class, religion, ethnicity, racial and ethnic conflict, political machines, historical events, political personalities, and technological innovations affected American politics. Discussions will also include the role and impact on American elections of mudslinging, political cartoons, political commercials, and attack ads.
William Reader has a PhD in American social history from the University of Massachusetts. He retired in 2008 after 37 years with the federal government and has since taught OLLI courses on The History of Media, American Social and Cultural History, How a Few Simple Things Changed History, and America between the World Wars.

 

F309  Irish History: Fintan the Wise to Fianna Fail

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Instructor: Kevin Barry Deasy
Included in the Irish Diaspora are some 30 to 40 million Americans—and many OLLI members. If you wonder what your restless ancestors were up to before they left the Auld Sod, this broad survey of Irish history covers 10,000 years, from pre-Celtic artifacts and ancient legends to the founding of the Irish Free State. In between, you’ll find Fomorians, Gaels, Vikings, Monks, Galloglasses, Saxons, Normans, Spaniards, Frenchmen, High Kings, English Kings, invasions, battles, Plantations, risings, spies, informers, Unionists, Republicans, Black-and Tans, the Anglo-Irish War of Independence, and a nasty Civil War.
OLLI member Kevin Barry Deasy hails from a long line of Irish rebels (and is named for one who got caught and hanged). Nevertheless, he cautions that neither the Loyalist narrative nor the Republican narrative can, by themselves, convey the whole truth of Ireland’s turbulent history. A retired US Army officer, Kevin holds a BS in electrical engineering from Northeastern University, and MS degrees in computer science and business management from George Washington University. He has worked as an engineer and manager at several government contracting firms around the Washington beltway, most recently at Northrop Grumman.

 

F310 “The World Will Hold its Breath:” The War Against Hitler and Mussolini

Thursdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Fairfax Lord of Life
Coordinators: Brad Berger, Emmett Fenlon
The year 2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the end of the Second World War. This defining epoch of the twentieth century casts a long shadow, culminating in a huge cost: fifty million lives lost and many more scarred by its effects. The aggression of Adolf Hitler and his ally Benito Mussolini caused the formation of an alliance of erstwhile friends and sometimes enemies to beat back the Fascist onslaught. Only a generation called the Greatest could be called upon to accomplish herculean efforts on both the home front and battlefront to support the Allied cause. National Park Service rangers have participated with OLLI in over 80 thematic courses, special events and trips since 2001.

 

R311 The American West

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 19–Nov. 9
Four sessions
Instructor: Richard Stillson
The past and present of the American West have captured the imagination of people throughout the world like no other region of the country. The cowboy herding cattle across dusty plains, the Indian fighting to maintain traditional lands and ancient cultures are but two iconic symbols of the West. But what is the West? Where does the West begin? Who are Westerners? How did this region acquire such an impact on the imagination, economy, society, and culture of the country? Focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries, this course explores the diverse geography, cultures, and economies of the region through its history. In addition to cowboys and Indians, we will examine how the environment, the federal government, agriculture, mining, movies, and the military influenced diversity, conflict, and change in the West. We will also look at both the historical record and fictional accounts through film and literature.
Richard Stillson has a PhD in economics from Stanford University . After a 25-year career at the International Monetary Fund, he retired to indulge his passion for history. He earned his PhD in history from The Johns Hopkins University and now teaches history at George Mason. Dr. Stillson is the author of Spreading the News: A History of Information in the California Gold Rush (University of Nebraska Press, 2006).

 

 

R312 Remembering My Hometown

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Coordinator: Martha Powers
This course was a hit at both Loudoun and Tallwood, so now it’s Reston’s turn! Each week, two OLLI members will share their stories of growing up, whether it be in the Midwest, Out West, or right here in Northern Virginia. Come and learn about your OLLI colleagues and their fascinating backgrounds!

 

R313 Their Day in the Sun

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 22–Oct. 27, Nov. 10–Nov. 17
Rose Gallery at Reston Community Center, Lake Anne
Note dates
Coordinators: Brad Berger, Emmett Fenlon
When one thinks of National Mall and Memorial Parks he or she generally pictures the towering Washington Monument and the grand spectacle of the Lincoln Memorial. However, there are many lesser known sites and memorials throughout the city that are the responsibility of the National Park Service. Sure to be eye opening, this course will unveil the artistic grandeur and symbolism of a handful of these places. In anticipation of the centennial of the National Park Service in 2016, please join us to celebrate the memorials that hide in plain sight. National Park Service rangers have participated with OLLI in over 80 thematic courses, special events and trips since 2001.

 

R314 Founding Fathers

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Instructor: Glenn Kamber

The instructor will use a variety of media, including the award-winning HBO series, John Adams, to examine the political philosophies of the founding fathers and how the persistent struggle between advocates of small government and those who back large government has reverberated down through the nation’s history. Course participants will be asked to consider what might have happened to our people and our land if we had lost the Revolutionary War.
Glenn Kamber is an OLLI member and instructor. He has taught a number of courses at Reston over the past four years that focus on current events, as well as political and social issues that affect our lives. He is a retired senior executive from the US Department of Health and Human Services where he managed policy and program development in the immediate office of eight HHS secretaries.

 

L315 Issues and Politics in the Civil War

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21–Oct. 19
Five sessions
Instructor: Robert Finkelstein

Many of the political, social, geographical, and economic differences that were considered causes of the Civil War were present prior to the ratification of the Constitution. This course will cover the history of the differences, the events between 1846 and 1860 that led to secession and war, the goals of the political and military leaders during the war, and the overall strategies of the Union and Confederacy. We will focus on the outcomes and consequences of selected battles that changed politics at the end of the war, but we will not describe and diagram the battles.
Robert Finkelstein earned his BS in American government from Columbia University, and his MS in computer systems from American University. Over the past five years, he has extensively read about and studied the Civil War.

 

L316 The Serendipity of Life!

Wednesday, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 30–Nov. 11
Seven sessions
Coordinator: Mark Weinstein
The Serendipity of Life! Man plans and God laughs. Do you think back over your life and contemplate things such as the following: the assorted paths of fate and events which formed your life, your family and where you are now; decisions that you made, or decisions made by some unknown persons that had consequences in your life; the homeroom assignment mistake that resulted in your meeting your lifelong best friend; the reluctant blind date when you met your spouse; the random military assignment that sent you to Europe when everyone else was going to Vietnam; the business meeting scheduled for 9/11 that was moved at the last minute from the World Trade Center to an office in NJ to be able to get in a round of golf in the afternoon? We all have events in our lives affected by happenstance. Join with your OLLI community, as we share these life molding events. We will have two speakers per class to discuss the paths their lives took.
Mark Weinstein, who has been thinking and chronicling his serendipity, will coordinate. He is an eight year OLLI member , has a BSEE, and has taught courses in aviation, American history, and computers.

 

L317 China in Retrospect

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 25–Oct. 16
Four sessions
Instructor: Keith Young
This course examines the War of 1812 with Great Britain, a war which neither country wanted but was unable to avoid. Although the war ended in what was realistically a draw, the young American republic learned some very valuable lessons. Andrew Jackson’s decisive victory at New Orleans on January 8, 1815, occurred before news of the signing of the Treaty of Ghent reached America. The official end of the war did not occur until February 16, 1815, when the US Senate approved the treaty. This course commemorates the bicentennial of the war and explains how and why it took place.
Keith Young, a retired naval officer with an interest in military history, lectures on many Civil War, and World War II topics.

 

 

400 Literature Theater & Writing

F401 OLLI Players Workshop

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Clifton Lord of Life
Instructor: Kathie West
This is a continuing acting and producing workshop for serious theater-minded participants by The OLLI Players, an amateur theater group affiliated with George Mason. We have already performed at various venues. In our repertoire we have lyrics, short scenes, and are currently working on a play. This will be continued from the spring session and then performed. We will premiere the play at OLLI and then perform for possible other venues. If you have a scene or a play you would like to see put on, bring it along, and we will try it. You will learn the ins and outs of presentation, memorization skills, and acting tricks. If we are asked to perform at a hospital, senior center or other venues, you must be willing to travel during the day. Be able and willing to tout OLLI and your talents!
Kathie West, an OLLI member, is a former high school theater teacher at Robert E. Lee High School and Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology.

 

F402 Readers’ Theater

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Clifton Lord of Life
Coordinators: Michelle Blandburg, Pati Rainey, Thelma Weiner, Roberta Feldman
Class Limit: 28
OLLI’s Readers Theater is great fun for the “secret actor” in all of us! Scripts are usually monologues, short skits, and acts or scenes from longer plays. Parts may be handed out in advance or read cold. No memorization is required. We rehearse before RT or between other classes; rehearsal can also be by phone when necessary. Props or costumes are not required. Time between performances allows for kudos, comments, and suggestions from the audience. Even if you’ve tried RT before, come back. We are always trying new things!

 

F403 Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Instructor: Elisabeth Wolpert
Ibsen is known as the father of Modern Drama. For all its well-made features, A Doll’s House presents a compelling image of human beings confronted by crisis. The play makes Ibsen our contemporary through its hierarchy of interwoven themes of bourgeois marriage, women’s equality, religion versus materialism, and dream versus reality. After analyzing the many tragic conflicts in the play, we will watch the film production and, if we have enough time, the film Hedda Gabler.
Elisabeth Wolpert was born and educated in France. Her doctoral thesis dealt with 16th century French literature. She enjoys being at OLLI where she has taught several courses.

 

F404 Memoir Writing

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Instructor: Dianne Hennessy King
Class limit: 24
Learn to write about your individual and shared history in ways that will clarify your vision, whether you are looking into your past, documenting your present, or contemplating your future. During class there will be some writing exercises in response to prompts, such as quotations, music, and video clips. We’ll also share some ideas on memoir techniques.
Dianne Hennessy King is a cultural anthropologist, writing instructor, editor, and television producer. For many years she was the coordinator of the annual “Writing Your Personal History” symposium in Vienna and has helped plan the Virginia Writers Club symposium in Charlottesville for three years. This will be her eleventh memoir class for OLLI. Dianne is co-authoring a book, Memoir Your Way, to be published in 2015.

 

F405 Let’s Study a Play Together: Almost, Maine

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 22–Sept. 29
Two sessions
Instructor: Doris Bloch
Class limit: 28
The objectives of this course are to read and discuss a play and to have fun doing it in a participatory group setting. Prior to each class meeting, we read the assigned act or roles independently, and during class we take turns reading the parts out loud. After the reading, we analyze the action and will also view video clips of several productions. All members of the class are encouraged to participate fully in readings and discussions. The chosen script is a contemporary play which concerns life, love, loss, friendships, and relationships. The action takes place in a small town in Maine, named Almost. Each scene involves a different set of players, yet they are somehow tied together, as one might expect within a closely knit community. The play runs a gamut of emotions, with some funny moments, some bittersweet scenes, and quite a few surprises. Registered class members will be contacted on how to obtain the script.
Doris Bloch is a co-chair of the Literature, Language and Theater Program Planning Group and has offered numerous play-reading classes at OLLI, covering dramas and playwrights ranging from commedia dell’ arte to George Bernard Shaw to Agatha Christie.

 

F406 The Sonnets of William Shakespeare

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 6–Nov. 10
Six sessions
Instructor: Karen Miles
Class limit: 50

The 154 sonnets of Shakespeare constitute a set of personal reflections on issues that we still wrestle with in our own lives, including: the inevitability of death and physical decay, the treachery of people, the fickleness of fortune, the vanity of worldly achievements, the nature of true and false love, and the tension between our physical selves and our spiritual selves. And yet the sonnets distill these experiences and insights into rigidly structured poems of just fourteen lines using familiar images from nature and the everyday world. In order to appreciate the range and artistry of the sonnets, each session will focus on a small group of sonnets that share a related theme. The recommended text is the edition of the sonnets from the Folger Shakespeare Library, edited by Barbara Mowat and Paul Werstine.
Karen Miles holds a PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in French Literature. She taught at Marquette University and the University of Wisconsin-Parkside before becoming a Program Officer at the National Endowment for the Humanities. Since retiring, she has co-taught several courses at the Washington National Cathedral, including one on Shakespeare’s Sonnets.

 

F407 Poetry Workshop

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Moderators: Mike McNamara, Jan Bohall
Class Limit: 18

This workshop allows both novice and experienced poets the opportunity to share their work and receive suggestions for improvement. Workshop members should bring an original poem in draft or revised form to each session. Two poems should be sent to the office for duplication one week before the first workshop, and a third poem brought to the first session. Poems can be sent by email to olliffx@gmu.edu or mailed to the Tallwood site assistant.
Mike McNamara, an OLLI member, has been published in several literary journals and magazines and has received awards from the Poetry Society of Virginia. Jan Bohall, also an OLLI member, has had poems published in various periodicals and has won awards from the Poetry Society of Virginia.

 

F408 A Tour of Hardy’s Wessex

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 30–Nov. 11
Seven sessions
Fairfax Lord of Life
Instructor: Kay Menchel
Thomas Hardy is one of England’s most beloved literary figures. His elegiac works chart the declining rural society of the late Victorian era. In this class we will sample three different expressions of Hardy’s art: short stories in the collection Life’s Little Ironies; a novel, The Mayor of Casterbridge; and some of Hardy’s poetry. The full text of The Mayor of Casterbridge and all the stories selected from Life’s Little Ironies are available for free at Project Gutenberg. http://www.gutenberg.org. The poems read in class are also free at the website of The Poetry Foundation.http://www.poetryfoundation.org. Course selections will be posted on docstore and emailed to registered students.
Kay Menchel, who grew up in Yorkshire, England, is a lawyer who also holds an MA in English literature from George Mason. She has taught numerous literature classes and always enjoys sharing her passion for English literature with OLLI members.

 

F409 The Poldark World

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 30–Nov. 11
Seven sessions
Instructor: Ellen Moody
In this course we’ll read Winston Graham’s Ross Poldark and Demelza, the first two of the twelve novel series, and we’ll watch and compare episodes from the first and second Poldark TV mini-series (1975-76, 2015). The first two Poldarks are brilliantly realized regional romances, excellently researched historical novels dramatizing later 18th century politically radical movements, medicine, mining, prisons, custom, law, and smuggling. Written in the aftermath of World War II, the books mirror issues of concern to that war-torn world, and the 1970s, and 2015 films adapt them to speak to issues of these times. We will treat the novels and films as historical fiction, creating usable pasts across 70 years. Suggested editions: Ross Poldark, Demelza. NY: Sourcebooks, 2009/2010, or London & NY: PanMacmillan, 2008.
Ellen Moody holds a PhD in English from the Graduate Center, CUNY, and has taught college literature classes for over 40 years. Her specialties include the 18th century, Trollope, Victorian, and film studies. Her book is on Trollope, but she also has published many articles and delivered papers the literature of the 18th through 19th century, and on historical fiction, as well as Winston Graham’s Poldark novels.

 

F410 Shakespeare Out Loud

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Clifton Lord of Life
Instructor: Wendy Campbell
Class limit: 25
This course is designed for those who dislike Shakespeare, don’t understand him, or don’t see what the fuss is all about. It is also for those who love the Bard, and want to share interpretive readings, and discuss his works. In other words, everyone is welcome. The class will read selected passages from the Bard’s plays and discuss what is happening, what the speakers might mean by what they say, how the lines reveal their characters, as well as what may be beautiful or interesting in the language. We will take a little time to look at the way actors we may know and love have approached the music of Shakespeare’s works, and look for puns and bawdy jokes–the man was a master. No advance reading is required.
Wendy Campbell graduated from Marymount University with a MEd. She taught in the gifted program in Fairfax County public schools for 20 years and was responsible for producing a Shakespeare play every year with actors who were 10 to 12 years old. She fell in love with Shakespeare at the age of 13

 

F411 The Movies of Robin Williams

Thursdays, 1:45–3:45, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Note time
Instructors: Michelle Blandburg, Martha Powers
Few actors can match the legacy that Robin Williams left when he died last year at age 63. In addition to a successful career as a stand-up comedian and TV star, he was a remarkable movie actor whose unstoppable talent shone through in every role – however hilarious or serious it might be. This course begins with an introduction to Robin Williams, including his appearance on Inside the Actors Studio, followed by seven of his greatest movies: Good Will Hunting, Good Morning Vietnam, Awakenings, Mrs. Doubtfire, Dead Poets Society, The World According to Garp, and The Birdcage.
Michelle Blandburg and Martha Powers both joined OLLI in 2013, and they have been active in the OLLI Players, Readers’ Theater, and other OLLI acting endeavors. They discovered a mutual admiration for Robin Williams and decided to bring his movies to other OLLI members who would enjoy them.

 

F412 From the Page to the Stage: The Crucible

Saturdays, 2:00–4:00, Sept. 12, 19, Oct. 3, 17
George Mason University Music/Theater Building
Room 2013
Coordinator: Florence Adler
Class limit: 20

What goes into creating a theatrical production? This course will offer a behind the scenes look at the making of a play! Using Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, students will get first hand experience by exploring and witnessing the playwright’s inspiration, the way designers create the theatrical space, and how actors rehearse The Crucible. The play will be presented by the School of Theater and the Mason Players.
The Crucible is a play based on a tightly-knit community with personal grievances that give way to superstition and madness. Miller’s timeless parable is vividly brought to life in this newly conceived production.
OLLI students can attend one or all four rehearsal weekends prior to opening, on Saturdays from 2:00-4:00.

  • Sept. 12: Read through and designer presentation.
  • Sept. 19: Rehearsal and stage blocking directions.
  • Oct. 3: Designer run and final staging.
  • Oct. 17: Tech production adding set, costumes, lights and sound.

The Performance runs in Harris Theatre on Oct. 22, 23, 24, 29, 30, 31 at 8:00 and on Oct 31 and Nov. 1 at 2:00. A post performance discussion will be held on Saturday, Oct. 31 after the 2:00 matinee. See Special Event 985.
Course instructors for this class will be the directors, Professor Howard Vincent Kurtz, theater faculty, and Maggie Rodgers, senior performance major from the School of Theater at Mason.

 

R413 Northanger Abbey: Jane Austen’s First and Last Novel

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 19–Nov. 9
Four sessions
Instructor: Beth Lambert
Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey has the distinction of being the first novel she wrote and the last one published. Nor is that all: written and revised, named and renamed, sold and resold, Northanger Abbey’s composition history is unique among Austen’s novels. Then again, so is its protagonist, Catherine Moreland, whom “no one would have supposed to be born a heroine.” Moreover, Austen’s voice is unmistakable in the novel’s handling of the sometimes-volatile social, literary, and political worlds of the 1790s. Much matter here for discussion, and that is what we will do as we discover the ways Austen’s unique talents are manifested in her first novel. Northanger Abbey is available on e-books; the recommended printed text is Barnes and Noble’s edition of the novel.
See F303 for instructor information.

 

R414 Gone With the Wind: An Iconic American Novel

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 21–Oct. 26
Six sessions
Instructor: Linda Blair
Almost everyone has something to say about Margaret Mitchell’s novel. Published in 1936 and made into a film in 1939, both forms of the Civil War era epic tell the story of, not only the war and its aftermath, but also of the four main characters: Scarlett O’Hara, Rhett Butler, Melanie Hamilton, and Ashley Wilkes. This course aims to explore fact and fiction surrounding the war and its aftermath, gender issues, and the novel’s place in American literary history. The format will be a combination of watching and discussing the film, then comparing significant aspects of the film to the novel.
Linda Blair, a retired Fairfax County high school English teacher, English Department Chair, and International Baccalaureate Diploma Program Coordinator, earned her doctorate in American Literature at The George Washington University.

 

R415 Shakespeare’s Master Magician

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 22–Oct. 13
Four sessions
Instructor: Kathryn Russell
In Shakespeare’s The Tempest we explore a world of enchantment created by the great magician Prospero, who wields his powers on fantastical creatures and humankind alike. His magic allows him to manipulate his island world, causing it to gravitate between chaos and restoration. The characters move haltingly toward a more desirable social order, if not the “brave new world” of imagination. Audiences over the centuries have enjoyed this romantic comedy, not only for its fantastical elements, but also for the playwright’s lively interest in human nature and exploration of real-life issues—justice and mercy, jealousy and love, destruction and renovation. The play also reflects Shakespeare’s real world with its focus on exploration and colonization. We will study the play through close reading of passages, class discussion, and scenes from several excellent videos. We’ll use the Folger Shakespeare Library paperback edition in class, though any copy of the play will suffice.
Kathryn Russell is an OLLI member and co-chair of the Program Committee. She taught high school English in Fairfax County for 21 years. An avid Shakespeare fan, she has taught many of the Bard’s plays at OLLI, as well as many other literature courses.

R416  Literary Roundtable

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 23–Nov. 11
Reston’s Used Book Shop at Lake Anne
Moderators: Janice Dewire, Carol Henderson
Class limit: 21

This continuing short-story discussion class will begin a new anthology: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd edition, edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone. It’s important that registrants obtain the revised and updated second edition, published in 2007, and available as a Touchstone Books paperback for $16.00 or less. The original 1999 edition (used by this class some years ago) contains almost completely different works. The fifty stories in the 2007 second edition were all published by American authors after 1970. Authors to be discussed this term include Russell Banks, Richard Bausch, Amy Bloom, and Junot Diaz.
Janice Dewire and Carol Henderson are enthusiastic Literary Roundtable participants and former OLLI Board members who, some years ago, took on the moderator role for this popular course. It is one of the longest running in Reston.

 

R417 A Novel for All Seasons: Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Instructor: Donna Macurdy
The Old Man and the Sea is considered to be Hemingway’s finest novel. Written in direct response to Hemingway’s critics, the old man in the novel becomes, for readers, a reflection of Hemingway himself. Published in 1952 in Life magazine, the story sold over five million copies in 48 hours. Released in hardcover, the story remained on the best sellers list for six months. Join us on the journey to catch the ‘one’ that almost got away. Sailing the waters off the Cuban coast with the old man, you decide if Hemingway achieves his goal: “to succeed when others believed he would fail.” Lecture, as well as small group discussion, will be a part of each class. In order to capture the mood of the journey, we will also be viewing Spencer Tracey’s highly acclaimed portrayal of the old man in the 1958 movie.
Donna Macurdy is a retired Fairfax County high school English teacher. She has a MEd in Curriculum and Instruction from George Mason University as well as a BA in English and Speech Communications from the University of Denver. Donna has taught a number of literature classes at OLLI, most recently To Kill a Mockingbird.

 

R418  Middlemarch

Thursdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Instructor: Kay Menchel
This class will tackle one of the greats of Victorian literature, George Eliot’s Middlemarch, a novel that allows us to immerse ourselves in the life of a provincial English town. The complexity and richness of the novel comes from Eliot’s depiction of her characters who do not exist to be admired or disparaged, but rather to be understood. To read about them is to realize that they possess lives as real and morally complex as our own. Perhaps this is why Virginia Woolf called Middlemarch “one of the few English novels for grown-up people.”
See F408 for instructor information.

 

L419 The New Yorker Round Table

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Coordinator: Michael Coyne
Class limit: 14
This class will focus on informal discussions of material from The New Yorker magazine or its website. Class members are encouraged to suggest items from any issue of the magazine. In past sessions discussions have included articles, profiles, fiction, poetry, and cartoons. Before each class, the coordinator will distribute the material by email. The class is highly interactive. Discussion usually goes beyond the articles themselves to include personal knowledge or experiences class members had in relation to the topic.

 

L420 Buddy Movies

Tuesdays: 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Oct. 13
Four sessions
Instructor: Ray Beery
This will be classic entertainment; come and laugh through the great comic films of our younger years. Bud Abbott asks Lou Costello, “Who’s on First?” Bob Hope and Bing Crosby compete for the attentions of Dorothy Lamour on The Road to Morocco. More: Laurel and Hardy, Our Gang,and Grumpy Old Men. We will pack in as much as we can in these four screenings.
Ray Beery, long time OLLI teacher, sheds his history and philosophy role to remember a movie ticket for a quarter and a nickel bag of popcorn.

L421 Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 20–Nov. 10
Four sessions
Instructor: Richard Wilan
Perhaps you will remember the musical Kiss Me Kate. In this play we meet the original Kate. Also you may remember the Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton film. Since the advent of recent feminist criticism, the play has generated a lively debate. Is Kate really “tamed” by Petruchio? (Brush up your falconry.) Or is Petruchio actually tamed by Kate? Or are they simply teamed? Why does the framework story, begun at the start, not come back at the end? Join our lecture discussion.
Richard Wilan received a PhD from the University of Maryland, where his dissertation was on Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida. He recently retired from Northern Virginia Community College where he taught writing and Shakespearean literature.

 

L422 Orson Welles at 100

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Instructor: Josh Pachter
Born exactly 100 years ago, the legendary Orson Welles was a larger-than-life figure. From the 1930s through his death in 1985, Welles made headlines for his work in theater, radio, film, and television. This course explores the life and work of one of the entertainment world’s true geniuses.
Josh Pachter is the assistant dean for communication studies and theater at NOVA’s Loudoun campus. He earned an MA in film study at the University of Michigan and has been teaching film at the college level since 1978.

 

L423 Writers’ Workshop: Writing the Mind Alive

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 23–Nov. 11
Instructors: Ralph Greenwood, Ed Sadtler
Class Limit: 10
This class uses a roundtable format that fosters an environment for writers of all levels to give and receive encouragement, feedback, and constructive criticism. All genres of writing are welcome, including poetry, fiction, memoirs, and historical pieces. All of these categories share the same underlying commitment: to write a compelling work that fully conveys the author’s intentions.
Ralph Greenwood, an OLLI member, is a retired project manager who lists his writing qualifications as “Wanna’be–Tryina’be–Gonna’be!!!!”
Ed Sadtler, an OLLI member, has been writing and occasionally publishing poetry for many years.

 

L424 Readers’ Theater in Loudoun

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 23–Nov. 11
Coordinator: Kathie West
Be Someone Different each week! Readers’ Theater in Loudoun will avail you of the opportunity to lose your inhibitions and act. You will receive a skit, monologue, poem or song each week and perform it the following week. No memorization is involved, only having fun and learning that standing in front of people and performing is easy. We use music stands and perform from the waist up with our script in front of us.

 

L425 Old Time Radio in Loudoun

Wednesdays, 2:15-3:40, Sept. 23–Nov. 11
Coordinator: Kathie West
Be the Next Burns and Allen in Old Time Radio. This class will be using original sound effects that you can find in your garage and home, nothing electrical or digital! We will be making these and adapting them to old radio scripts. You will listen to some of the oldies but also perform some of the scripts. It is a blast into the past with Stan Freberg, Bob and Ray, Bing Crosby, and Fibber McGee and Molly. Come, play, and have fun.

 

L426 Two by Forster

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Instructor: Kay Menchel
In this class we will read the two novels of E.M. Forster in which the narrative is divided between Italy and England, Where Angels Fear to Tread and Room with a View. Along with the delights of the Italian and English country sides, we will encounter memorable characters, comedy, tragedy, and opera. Both novels were written at the very beginning of the twentieth century and depict the tension between social expectations and personal desires.
See F408 for instructor information.

 

500 Languages

F501 Intermediate Spanish Conversation 2

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Instructor: Ligia Glass
This class is for students who have had a basic Spanish course or who feel they have a good working knowledge of the principles of Spanish. We will study verbal constructions beyond the present tense, and increase our vocabulary to be able to form sentences and dialogues for use in everyday situations. You will have ample practice time to reinforce the lesson. Culture of the Hispanic world will be part of the learning process. You will learn idioms, and differences in the “speaking” of Spanish in different countries. Participation is encouraged so be ready to have an exciting and fun class. No text is necessary.
Ligia Glass is a native of Panama and retired from the Securities and Exchange Commission. She has over 15 years experience teaching all levels of Spanish in NOVA as a Spanish teacher and at the Fairfax County Adult Education Program. Ligia holds an MA in foreign languages, MA in Latin American area studies, and ABD in Latin American literature.

F502 Beginning French

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Instructor: Beverley Persell
This class is for those who have never studied French or who need to review after many years of not using the language. Basic grammar and French culture will be explained. You will be taught how to compose simple sentences using the verbs “to be” (etre), “to have” (avoir), and “to go” (aller), and to build a vocabulary using adjectives, terms for family members, and places. A French film will be shown in the seventh week, and a French lunch will be served in the eighth.
Beverley Persell learned French when she lived in France as a child. She has taught French in five states and locally at Flint Hill Prep School and The Congressional School. She majored in French at Mary Washington College, and studied at the Sorbonne, the University of Toulouse, School Year Abroad in Rennes and The French Traveler Program for French teachers in Paris, Strasbourg, Aix-en Provence, and Sarlat.

 

F503 Spanish Conversational Forum

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 23–Nov. 11
Instructor: Bernardo Vargas
Class Limit: 16
This ongoing conversational forum meets regularly during the year. The objectives are to practice the Spanish language and learn about Spanish/Latino culture through articles, photographs, videos, and speakers. Classes are conducted entirely in Spanish. English will be used only occasionally to explain grammar and idiomatic expressions. A prerequisite for this class is an ability to converse in Spanish at the high intermediate to advanced level. Students are encouraged to make presentations in Spanish on timely topics of their choosing. Come join us and improve your Spanish.
Bernardo Vargas, a graduate of the Pontifical Catholic University Javeriana in Bogotá, Colombia, is an editor of an online Spanish newspaper.

 

F504 Latin II

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Instructor: Alana Lukes
Class Limit: 20
This continuing course is for beginning Latin students who know the verb endings of the present, imperfect, and perfect tenses. We take a modern, non-traditional sight, sound, and internet approach to this ancient language. By reading about the adventures of a 1st century CE family living in Roman Britain, we continue to explore Latin grammar, vocabulary, and restored pronunciation. Class meetings employ a media version of the text, North American Cambridge Latin Course, Unit 2, 4th edition. Purchase of the text for home study is optional. A fee of $5 will be due after confirmation of enrollment. The fee offsets e-learning program costs.
Alana Lukes, an OLLI member, has taught Latin for over 25 years at the middle school, high school, and college levels.

 

R505 Intermediate Spanish Conversation, (Part 1)

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Instructor: Pamela Garcia
This is Part One of an intermediate conversation course for people who can converse in Spanish about basic topics in the present tense and are ready to talk about past experiences. The focus of the class will be conversational in nature with topics that describe people, pastimes, daily routines, health, music, visual arts, shopping, dining out, and travel. The primary purpose of this course is to encourage the participants’ increased proficiency in conversational settings by using basic expressions and vocabulary.
Pamela Garcia recently retired from teaching all levels of Spanish in Montgomery County Public Schools. She has a BA in Spanish and masters degrees in bilingual multicultural education and supervision.

 

Religious Studies

F601  Judaism, Jews and Jewishness: The Origins and Evolution of Varieties of Jewish Practice, Belief and Identity

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 5–Nov. 9
Six sessions
Instructor: Gilah Goldsmith
For more than 2000 years, the Jewish people have lived in many places, embedded in the surrounding cultures and yet distinguishable from them. The result has been such a wide range of beliefs and practices that contemporary scholars talk about “Jewish cultures” in the plural. At the same time, these cultures are uniquely linked by shared history and sacred texts. This course will attempt to describe the historical processes and shared texts that have led to the various “flavors” of Jews and Judaisms over time and in the world today.
1. Varieties of Jewish practice, belief, and identity today: an overview of modern Jewry from secular to Hasidic, primarily in the US and Israel and with an emphasis on the issues that divide and unite the community(ies).
2. Jews in the ancient world: The creation of the first Diaspora in the sixth century BCE led to a complex set of relationships among the Jews in the Land of Israel and between them and the Jews of the rest of the Mediterranean and Near East. Under Roman and Persian domination issues of belief and identity were raised which have remained important to the present day.
3. Mizrach, or Jews of the Islamic World: As Islam spread throughout the Near East and Mediterranean, the Jews of those lands, like other non-Arab peoples, responded to and contributed to the beliefs, practices, and customs of the new dominant religious culture.
4. Sepharad, or the Jews of the Iberian Peninsula: Under Muslim rule, a distinctive Jewish culture evolved which then responded to changes in Islam, the Christian Reconquista, and eventual expulsion from Spain.
5. Ashkenaz, or the Jews of Northern Europe: The Jewish communities of Christian Europe arrived late and, to a great extent, grew up isolated from the communities of Spain and the Muslim world. This isolation resulted in certain beliefs and practices.
6. Back to the Modern World: Reflected in the Jewish world were changes in European culture, from the Reformation, through the Enlightenment, to the rise of secularism and the nation state. These changes were,found, first in Ashkenaz itself, and then throughout the world wherever European imperialism took “Modernity.”
Gilah Goldsmith, a graduate of Harvard University and George Washington University Law School, is a retired government attorney who for 20 years has led the weekly Torah study group at Beth El Hebrew Congregation.

 

F602 The Gospel According to Paul the Apostle

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Instructor: Steven C. Goldman
Of the 27 books of the New Testament, 13 are letters that claim to be written by Paul the Apostle. Furthermore, the Book of Acts devotes significant attention to Paul’s conversion to Christianity (after being one of its major opponents), his missionary activities, and his theological teachings. This course will focus on the major doctrines that Paul taught and how they are understood and implemented, in often very different ways, in the various manifestations of Christianity. The course will also compare and contrast Paul’s message with the teachings attributed to Jesus in the four canonical Gospels and with the doctrines set forth by other writers of the New Testament. Specific issues to be addressed will include: salvation; relations with and the status of Jews who do not accept Paul’s understanding of the Gospel; lawsuits among Christians; marriage, divorce and family relations; homosexuality; the role of women in the church; slavery; the “Lord’s Supper” and how it is to be observed; the “Second Coming” of Christ; and the Resurrection.
Steven C. Goldman is a member of the OLLI Board of Directors and serves as chair of OLLI’s Religious Studies Program Planning Group. He has taught numerous courses on alternative understandings of Biblical doctrine.

 

F603 How Jesus Became God

Tuesday, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 22–Oct. 13
Four sessions
Instructor: Jack Dalby
New Testament scholar Bart Ehrman states: “At the heart of the Christian faith is a spectacular claim: Jesus of Nazareth was, and is, God. But this is not what the original disciples believed during Jesus’ lifetime, and it is not what Jesus claimed about himself.” How is it that, within 100 years of his death, Jesus, an itinerant Jewish preacher, went from being seen as God’s unique messenger to God himself? In this course, we will examine how a small group of ancient, monotheistic Jews came to allow for their one God to have a “son.” We will examine the belief in divine humans in ancient Judaism; the ministry, death and resurrection of Jesus; worship practices of early Christians; Christology in the New Testament; and later Christology from the second and third centuries. Having a copy of How Jesus Became God by Bart Ehrman and access to a copy of the New Testament would be helpful, but not required.
Jack Dalby, president of White Oak Communications, is an OLLI member who has taught classes on the historical Jesus, St. Paul, and the first Christians. He holds a BS in communication arts from James Madison University and has taken graduate classes in history at George Mason.

 

 F604 “A Big Heart Open to God”: a Seminar on Pope Francis

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 20–Nov. 10
Four sessions
Fairfax Lord of Life
Coordinator: Greg Cleva
Pope Francis is the first Jesuit Pope and the first Pope from Latin America. He has aroused interest because of his embrace of a simple life, and his remarkable candor on a broad range of issues.
The first session will introduce Jorge Mario Bergoglio, Archbishop of Buenos Aires, Argentina, the first Pope to be called Francis after the iconic servant of the poor, Francis of Assisi. His biographer, Austen Ivereigh refers to him as “the Great Reformer” and a “Gospel radical.” We will explore the meaning of these characterizations and the influences that have shaped Francis, the man and priest.
The second session will discuss in detail Pope Francis’ pivotal work The Joy of the Gospel Evangeli Gaudium, and how this conveys the essence of Francis’ call to a “missionary conversion” of the Catholic Church.
The third session will discuss Pope Francis’s formation as a Jesuit, as well as his views on leadership and leadership style.
The fourth session will discuss Pope Francis’ encyclical on the environment, his views on women and their role in the Church, his writings on the world’s economic systems and income inequality, and his place in the history of the Catholic Church.
Seminar leaders include: Fr. Innocent Rugaragu, S.J., a Jesuit priest from Rwanda. He has lived and worked in other parts of Africa, particularly Tanzania. He is currently finishing his doctoral work in the area of conflict resolution peacekeeping at George Mason. Sandy Cleva received her BA and MA with distinction from the University of Virginia. She is currently a member of the Ignatian Volunteer Corps and is assigned to the Arlington County Office of Defender Aid. Fred Pugarelli is a graduate of Columbia University and New York University. Before retiring he was the business manager and director of a large Catholic parish in the Arlington Diocese. He previously lectured at OLLI on Celtic spirituality. Greg Cleva has a PhD in International Politics from The Catholic University of America. He is a retired foreign affairs analyst with the Department of Defense.

 

F605 From God To The Afterlife in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

Wednesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 23–Nov. 11
Instructor: John Rybicki
Concepts of God’s attributes and characteristics are important in the development of beliefs about the afterlife in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Several concepts are instrumental in afterlife beliefs, such as the understanding of the development of Divine justice and mercy, compassion and punishment, and the way God balances and prioritizes these. In these sessions, we will review the development of concepts of God in each of the three traditions in order to better understand the ideas of reward and punishment in afterlife beliefs. Based on belief in the afterlife, is the God of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam the same God?
John Rybicki has been an OLLI contributor for over twenty years. He has diplomas in Theological Studies from both the Virginia Theological Seminary and the Antiochian Orthodox Church. He has studied at St. George’s College in Jerusalem and has received a Master of Theology degree from the St. John of Damascus Institute of Theology, Balamand University. John recently retired after ten years as a Pastoral Associate at the Riderwood Retirement Community in Maryland with responsibility for religious education, where he facilitated a weekly Jewish-Christian religious dialogue.

 

 R606  Into the Light: An Introduction to the Fourth Gospel

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Instructor: Pete Gustin
For good reason, the Gospel according to John, the fourth Gospel, stands well outside of the so-called synoptic Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Purported to be authored by the Beloved Disciple, the fourth Gospel is the product of a community unlike any other in the primitive apostolic Church. This 8-week class will explore the authorship and purposes of the Gospel, as well as the environment in which it was produced and read. The exploration will focus on four major areas: What was the author trying to convey? How was the author’s message developed and possibly altered by later editors and redactors? What hermeneutic ought we try and apply to the text to help us understand it more fully? And most importantly, what does the text say to us, individually and corporately, in our present circumstances?
Dr. Pete Gustin received his BA (English/philosophy) from Coppin State College, Baltimore, with a concurrent AB in theology from St. Mary’s Seminary College, Baltimore. He received his MDiv from Virginia Theological Seminary and his DMin from Seabury-Western Theological Seminary.

 

L607  Three Existentialist Theologians: Martin Buber, Gabriel Marcel, and Paul Tillich

Tuesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 22, Oct. 6, and Oct 13
Three sessions
Instructor: Greg Cleva
The revival of religious studies in our times is best exemplified in the thought of three theologians: Martin Buber, Gabriel Marcel, and Paul Tillich. Representing different faiths–Buber (Judaism), Marcel (Catholicism), and Tillich (Protestantism)–their works are precursors of the post-modern era that takes us beyond the reliance on science into the realm of our own existential searching and personal experiences.
The first class will provide an overview of existentialist philosophy, particularly as outlined in the works of William Barrett (Irrational Man and What is Existentialism) and how this thought is applied to the study of Theology.
The second class will discuss the life and work of the great Jewish theologian/philosopher Martin Buber. Buber, a man of the Hasidic tradition, is best known for his pioneering work, I and Thou, which continues to be a classic in today’s world.
The third class will discuss the life and work of Gabriel Marcel, a Frenchmen, a Catholic, and a contemporary of Sartre and Camus. He defines the outlook of the “Christian existentialist.”
The fourth class will focus on Paul Tillich. Tillich’s The Courage to Be calls us “to accept our acceptance,” and to grow into the person we are called to become.
See F604 for instructor information.

L608  Survey of Non-Traditional Beliefs

Tuesdays, 11:50-1:15, Sept. 22–Oct. 27
Six sessions
Instructor: Linda Bender
During the class we will explore such non-traditional concepts as karma, reincarnation, the chakras, mystics and the mystical sects, non-medical healing systems like Reiki or therapeutic touch, the implications of free will choice and being responsible for the results of our choices, the alchemist’s physical elements (air, earth, water, etc.), and the layers of energy in the body. Our focus will be on understanding the concepts and implications of the various topics, using examples and discussion questions, including how to recognize them in actual day-to-day situations. We will talk about how facets of these beliefs might be used as effective tools or how to adapt them to your daily activities should you be interested in doing so. There will be time for questions so be sure to bring them to each session. There will be handouts for each class and a list of resources relating to the various topics.
Linda Bender spent 20 years as an Army Intelligence Officer’s wife and another 30 years managing billing offices for hospital and physician practices. She has continued her interest in and learning of non-traditional beliefs. She has also taught meditation systems for OLLI. Please see http://olligmu.org/profiles/index-profiles.html for more information about her background and experience.

L609 New Testament Tensions

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Instructor: Steven C. Goldman
The 27 books of the New Testament are the principal sacred texts of Christianity. However, there are substantial differences of opinion regarding the meaning of major doctrines taught within these compositions. Even those who accept the verbal inspiration and inerrancy of the texts do not always agree on the interpretation of specific teachings. We will examine a number of these tensions in this course including:
Is God a Trinity?
Salvation: What does it mean? How is it obtained? Can it be lost? Is it only for Christians?
Death: Is it unconscious soul-sleep or a transition to immediate rewards or punishments?
Predestination and Free Will: The New Testament teaches both. Can these doctrines be reconciled?
Baptism: Is it a rite of initiation? Required for salvation? What about baptism of the dead?
Hebrew Scripture Laws: Which are still binding on Christians? Do the obligations differ for Jewish Christians and Gentile Christians?
See F602 for instructor information.

 

650 Humanities and Social Sciences

F651A  True Colors: Self Awareness and Interpersonal Relationships

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 21–Sept. 28
Two sessions
Instructor: Eduardo S. Rodela
Class limit: 20
Success and satisfaction in our relationships can largely depend on how well we understand ourselves and those with whom we interact. It is our personality that impacts our relationships. Personality refers to individual differences in characteristic patterns of thinking, feeling, and behaving. A question often asked is; can our personality change in retirement, and how does it impact the way we get along with others? A personality assessment tool known as the Birkman method will be in use in this class. It integrates behavior and motivational data to understand ourselves better and to improve relationships. A brief Birkman assessment tool and feedback will be available for you during the course. The results of the assessment and several applications will be discussed during the two session course. This class will be repeated four times this term. Please register for only one class.
Eduardo S. Rodela, has a PhD in Organizational Psychology and Social Work from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and, an MSW. He retired from federal service with the US Environmental Protection Agency where he served as a management consultant. He owns his private practice and is interested in individual behavior change.

F651B True Colors: Self Awareness and Interpersonal Relationships

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 5–Oct. 12
Two sessions
Instructor: Eduardo S. Rodela
Class limit: 20
This is a repeat of class F651A. This class will be repeated four times this term. Please register for only one class.

F651C True Colors: Self Awareness and Interpersonal Relationships

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 19–Oct. 26
Two sessions
Instructor: Eduardo S. Rodela
Class limit: 20
This is a repeat of class F651A. This class will be repeated four times this term. Please register for only one class.

 

F651D True Colors: Self Awareness and Interpersonal Relationships

Mondays, 11:50–1:15, Nov. 2–Nov. 9
Two sessions
Instructor: Eduardo S. Rodela
Class limit: 20
This is a repeat of class F651A. This class will be repeated four times this term. Please register for only one class.

 

F652  Religions and Traditions in the Middle East

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Instructor: Johnnie C. Hicks
Long before the discovery of oil in the Middle East, the region already had its greatest export, one that has arguably had the greatest impact in shaping human history That export is one of “words.” Words served to create Western civilization and later formed stories describing man’s relationship to God. Words spoken directly to Zoroaster, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, Muhammad, and others compelled them to believe and follow the teachings of “One True God.” Words were later collected and written down and became the basis for five great Western religions and the countless variations among them. Along with an overview of today’s Middle Eastern Jews, Christians, and Muslims, we will look at the religious traditions of Alawites, Alevis, Baha’is, Druzes, Mandaeans, Samaritans, Yazidis, and Zoroastrians. The focus of this course is not on theological concepts per se, but rather on the diversity of religious groups and the traditions that identify their beliefs and cultures. In this way, we hope to better understand the current conflicts and possible implications for their social and political outcomes. Just as ancient “words” have shaped our own Western beliefs and religious traditions, they continue to live on in the rich diversity of religious traditions in the Middle East.
Johnnie Hicks, a professional educator and counselor, carries a lifelong passion for learning about world cultures and religions. She has twice lived in Iran where she taught at the Teheran American School and visited neighboring countries. Johnnie has retired from Fairfax County Public Schools and taught several courses on multicultural topics for George Mason University.

 

F653 Metaphysics: Reflections on the Nature of Reality

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Instructor: Irmgard Scherer
Metaphysics studies reality at its most fundamental level and examines how the mind can take hold of it. This course studies some of the greatest metaphysicians in the history of ideas who tried to grasp “Being-as-such,” not only physical-sensible reality, but also non-physical or supersensible entities that are not accessible to the senses. We will start with the fragments of the “Pre-Socratics” in ancient Greece who famously asked: what is the source of all things? We will then study various philosophers through the ages: Democritus, Plato and Aristotle, Aquinas and Anselm. Their theories were superceded when the illusory nature of the senses came under scrutiny. Early modern thinkers ushered in new views of reality: Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, and Kant. As certainty about what is real becomes ever more elusive, boundaries between realism and anti-realism are blurred and modern thinking considers whether it is even possible to study science without recourse to metaphysics.
Irmgard Scherer, a US citizen born in Germany, is emeritus professor of philosophy at Loyola University Maryland, where she taught core courses, honors ethics courses, courses in the history of ideas and science, as well as topics in her specialty–Kant and 18th century aesthetic theory. Since retiring she has taught OLLI courses, such as Ancient Greek Roots of Modern Science, Philosophical Aesthetics, Intro to Kant among others.

F654 Contemporary Issues in Criminology

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 24–Oct. 8
Three sessions
Facilitator: Cynthia Lum
In this course, three of George Mason University’s experts from the Department of Criminology, Law and Society will give presentations on three contemporary issues in criminology. Laurie Robinson, former assistant US Attorney General and now Robinson Professor, will discuss her work leading the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing and the Task Force recommendations to improve policing in the United States. Professor Charlotte Gill, Deputy Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy (CEBCP), will explore community approaches to crime prevention and their prospects and pitfalls. Finally, Professor Christopher Koper, senior fellow in the CEBCP, will explore the hot topic of firearms violence and gun policy. The lectures and discussions will be facilitated by Professor Cynthia Lum, Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy.

F655 Chinese Cultural Perspectives

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Oct. 22–Nov. 12
Four sessions
Instructors: Lihong Wang, Xiao He
This series of four lectures will focus on Chinese cultural influences on food, decorative arts, astrology, architecture, and landscape design.
The first lecture will highlight the historical significance and geographical distribution of bamboo-growing regions in China and its influence on the symbolic significance of bamboo in traditional Chinese culture.
The second lecture will focus on the Chinese perspectives on food, nutrition, and traditional medicine and how the body’s health reflects the natural balance–or imbalance-of the forces of yin and yang within it.
The third lecture will present the historical context of the Chinese zodiac system and a discussion of the personality traits and significance associated with the twelve animal signs.
The final lecture will discuss the origins of Chinese paper cut folk arts and the cultural significance reflected in works created, both past and present. Participants will learn how paper cutting is integrated into many traditional Chinese customs and can even be found in Chinese vernacular architectural motifs.
Ms. Lihong Wang is an Associate Professor at Beijing Language and Culture University (BLCU). In January 2011 she came to the US to serve as resident director of the Confucius Institute at George Mason University. She has her MA in linguistics from Jilin University in China and her PhD in intercultural communication and foreign language education from Durham University in the UK.
Ms. Xiao He is an Associate Professor at Beijing Language and Culture University (BLCU). She is currently an instructor teaching ancient Chinese literature at the Confucius Institute at George Mason University. Before coming to the United States, she taught Chinese at the Confucius Institute at McMaster University in Canada, and taught English at Beijing Language and Culture University. In 1995 she received her MA from Sichuan University in China. She was a visiting scholar at the University of Toronto in 2001, and at the University of Pennsylvania in 2009.

 

F656  Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?

Thursdays, 11:30–1:30, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Note time
Facilitator: Gloria Loew
Michael Sandel teaches an undergraduate course in political philosophy at Harvard, and his was the first Harvard course to be made freely available online. Over the course of 12 lectures, Sandel poses intriguing ethical dilemmas and masterfully engages his students in debate to try to figure out what is the right thing to do. The philosophies of Jeremy Bentham, Immanuel Kant, John Locke, John Stuart Mill, Robert Nozick, and John Rawls are explained and used to reason through these dilemmas. The course is available at http://www.justiceharvard.org/, where you can find more information about Michael Sandel and this course. There is also information about his book Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? Click on the link “Watch Intro” to get a feel for his teaching style. The classes can also be seen on YouTube and there is also has a TED talk on the subject. This will be a two-hour long course; we will watch the video the first hour and spend the second hour further analyzing and discussing what we watched.the OLLI fall semester is eight weeks long, we will cover only the first eight lectures.
Gloria Loew has an MA in Human Resource Development from The George Washington University. She was Staff Development Manager of a division of a large IT company.

 

 

L657 Family History Workshop

Mondays, 9:40–11:50, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Instructor: Ray Beery
Many of us take delight in remembering our forebears through genealogy research. In this workshop, we will share what we have done, from beginner to sophisticated researcher and recorder. While the emphasis on research will be the Internet, there will be old-fashioned library activities and the completion of forms integral to serious family history.
Ray Beery is a long time OLLI teacher. He has been collecting and building his family tree for some 30 years. His immigrant ancestors include Nicholas Bieri, a Swiss Mennonite who arrived in Lancaster County in 1727 and was one of the original Pennsylvania Dutch. Another was Thomas Farmer, who received a Jamestown plantation in 1625.

 

L658  The Nuremberg Trials

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 22–Nov. 10
Instructor: Steve Greenhouse
The Nuremberg Trials were the first international war crimes trial in history. This course traces the history of the laws of war; the organization of the Nuremberg Tribunal; and discusses the prosecutors, judges, defense counsel, and the defendants (including psychiatric evaluations of some of them). The course will also cover the indictments, verdicts, and sentences. Finally, we will discuss in detail the substantial and far-reaching legacy of Nuremberg. The trials were the the world’s way of confronting unspeakable evil perpetrated by a civilized nation in modern times. One historian described them as “legalism’s greatest moment of glory,” but legal absolutists have characterized them as invalid, partly because of their use of ex post facto law. Despite the criticism, the trials gave the leaders of a defeated nation the benefit of the rule of law and due process with the presumption of innocence, something they denied their millions of victims.
Steve Greenhouse received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from Catholic University and recently retired after working in the space communications field for the last 35 years of his career. Steve has long held an acute interest in the Nuremberg Trials and the crimes which precipitated them, the perpetrators, and their motivations.

 

L659 Infectious Diseases, People, and Geography

Thursdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Instructor: Barbara Crain
In the 1860s over 100,000 Egyptian laborers died of cholera while working on the creation of the Suez Canal. Yellow fever and malaria sent roughly 85% of the Panama Canal workforce into hospital at least once in the initial two years of canal building (1904-1906). As of May 2015, Ebola claimed 11,020 deaths mostly in three West African countries. Where did all these diseases come from? Why were they present in these particular areas? Why does an outbreak become an epidemic or even a pandemic? Medical geography is concerned with the study of the spatial distribution of disease. It incorporates geographic techniques, and it looks at the impact of climate and location on health. This exciting course will provide an overview of selected infectious diseases, their past and present spatial distribution, and their causes. Expect some light reading, some lectures, small group work, and in-class discussions.
Barbara Crain holds an MA in geography from the University of Heidelberg, Germany, and an MS in environmental science from Johns Hopkins University. She is an Associate Professor at NOVA.

 

700 Current Events

F701 What’s in the Daily News?

Mondays, 9:30–11:00, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Note time
Moderators: Peter Van Ryzin, Dorsey Chescavage
Class Limit: 38
Do you have an opinion on what’s happening in the world today? Would you like to express and share your views with others? Join other news junkies each week to discuss, debate, and, yes, sometimes disagree as to the significance and meaning of events, both great and small. All views are welcomed in a spirit of give-and-take.
Peter Van Ryzin, an addicted news junky and OLLI member, was a career Marine who served two combat tours in Vietnam before retiring as a colonel in 1990. Dorsey Chescavage, an OLLI member, retired from the Jefferson Consulting Group, where she was a registered lobbyist specializing in military and veterans’ health care.

 

F702  Challenges and Opportunities Facing U.S. Foreign Policy in 2015

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 22–Oct. 13
Four sessions
Coordinator: Tom Switzer
“Plus ca change, Plus la meme chose” (The more changes made, the more of the same thing). Americans have always been open to effective changes, but it seems as if U.S. Foreign Policy is currently stuck in low gear in the face of simultaneous and unprecedented threats to vital U.S. security interests in varied regions around the globe. President Obama had promised a refreshing change in U.S. foreign policy, one that would favor enhanced, proactive American diplomacy. However many concerned observers, including key allies, have expressed regrets that the U.S. has retrenched from its 70-year old leadership of the free world and, instead, seems content to “lead from behind.” This topical four-week series will present experienced American diplomats who will examine the complex interactions and frustrations–including the exasperating role of a divided, partisan Congress–involved in the successful making and implementation of foreign policy. The lead speaker will provide a general overview of the broad global issues involved, and three other speakers will focus on the special challenges to U.S policy interests in especially problematic regions. We warmly welcome the audience’s vigorous participation in this important discussion.
Sept. 22: Thomas Switzer, a career Foreign Service Officer with experience on four continents and currently a Consultant on International Diplomatic Events, will present an “Overview of the Main Political, Economic, Public Support, and Other Factors Underlying the Success or Failure of US Global Foreign Policies.” He will also spotlight several of the most dangerous threats to US security and offer some general suggestions as to how the effectiveness of American counter-threats might be enhanced.
Sept. 29, Andrea Farsach, a veteran Foreign Service Officer,: “Can increasing Terrorism and Instability in the Middle-East Be Contained”? She served all of her overseas tours in the Middle East. A leading Arabic speaker and scholar, she is especially insightful on the role of Islam in the society, polity, culture, and families in the Arab world, as well as the threats from ISIS, Iran, and Israeli-Palestinian conflicts.
Oct. 6 Ambassador Richard Miles, three-time ambassador in Bulgaria, Georgia and Kazakhstan, as well as Deputy Chief of Mission in Moscow: “Russia and Its Neighbors: Is There Still Time for Political Resolutions?”, will examine how and why Russia occupied Crimea, as well as fomenting conflict in the Ukraine. What are Putin’s intentions, as well as his strengths and weaknesses in this recent burst of threats aimed at neighboring countries?
Oct. 13, Ambassador David Shinn, leading African specialist, former ambassador to Ethiopia and Burkina Faso and currently a professor at George Washington University: “Can Exploding Terrorism, Disease, and Instability in Africa be Limited?”, Ambassador Shinn will examine what underlies the recent outbreak of terrorism and kidnapping in East Africa and Nigeria and what the US and its allies can do to counter it.

 

F703  Great Decisions 2015

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 23–Nov. 11
Moderators: Gordon Canyock, Ted Parker
Class limit: 30
For over 50 years, the Foreign Policy Association has sponsored discussion groups throughout the United States to investigate some of the world’s greatest challenges affecting our lives. This course is a repeat of the spring term course F703 and covers the same eight topics: Russia and the “Near Abroad,” Privacy in the Digital Age, Sectarianism in the Middle East, India Changes Course, US Policy Toward Africa, Syria’s Refugee Crisis, Human Trafficking, and Brazil in Metamorphosis. A briefing book and video covering each week’s topic will set the stage for class discussion. There is a $21 materials fee payable within one week of enrollment acceptance.
Gordon Canyock is a retired military intelligence officer, former State Department consultant, and long-time member of OLLI.
Ted Parker, a retiree from the US Department of Education, had a 40-year career in education, which included teaching and managing at local, state, and collegiate levels. He has been a member of OLLI for several years.

 

R704 The Supreme Court: Current Cases

Wednesdays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 30–Nov. 11
Seven sessions
Rose Gallery at Reston Community Center, Lake Anne
Instructor: Ben Gold
This is a discussion class addressing cases the Supreme Court will hear, or has heard, during its 2015-2016 term. We will use instructor-provided material consisting of the cases’ background, lower-court decisions, and edited briefs filed with the Supreme Court, including audio of oral arguments for selected cases. Materials will be available only online, so Internet access is required. Our discussion of each case will look at both sides of every argument, the likely position of each justice, and the social and political context of the case.
Ben Gold, an OLLI member, has a BA in political science from Stanford University and earned an MS in computer science as a naval officer. After retirement from the Navy, he worked in the computer industry and has served as a docent at the Supreme Court for the past 12 years.

R705 All the News That’s Fit to Print

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Moderator: Dick Kennedy
This is a chance to discuss news and current events with other OLLI members who are trying to understand our changing world. More than ever we need to question information that comes to us from TV, radio, the Internet, magazines, bumper stickers, and newspapers. We will examine and discuss some of the day’s hot topics in world, national, and local news. We usually focus primarily on a few topics in order to explore issues and get various insights. This is an interactive class. All viewpoints and opinions are respected, needed, and welcomed As Walter Cronkite once said, “In a democracy agreement is not required, but participation is.”
Dick Kennedy, an OLLI member, is a retiree from the senior executive service at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. He enjoys analyzing the news from multiple sources and engaging in good discussions with colleagues.

L706 Korea: North and South

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 8–Oct. 15
Two sessions
Instructor: Greg Scarlatoiu

  • Oct. 8: “The North Korean Conundrum.” This session will address the history, current state, and future prospects of the North Korean human rights situation. How does the repressive Kim regime maintain the status quo? What are the US and international communities doing to effect change? Scarlatoiu will also address the factors that contribute to the longevity of the Kim regime, as well as the forces that are eroding the Kim family’s grip on power.
  • Oct. 15: The Han River Miracle: South Korea’s Past, Present, and Future. The second session will address the economic, social, and political evolution undergone by South Korea since its establishment in 1948. Scarlatoiu will discuss South Korea’s astounding economic development, also known as “The Han River Miracle.” There is a “darker side” to that miracle; it is the price South Koreans had to pay to accomplish this unprecedented success story. Finally he will also describe the current political outlook of South Korea, as well as political security, trade, and investment issues pertaining to the US-South Korea alliance.

Greg Scarlatoiu has an MA in Law and Diplomacy (MALD) from the Fletcher School, Tufts University, and an MA and BA from Seoul National University, Department of International Relations. Currently he is Executive Director of the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK) in Washington, D.C., tasked with researching and reporting, as well as conducting educational and outreach programs.

 

800 Science, Technology & Health

F801 Science and Technology Today

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 22–Oct. 13
Four sessions
Fairfax Lord of Life
Coordinator: John Acton
Sept. 22: Dr. Theodore C. Dumas, Assistant Professor, Krasnow Institue for Advanced Studies at George Mason. The neurobiology of learning and memory is a vast area of research, producing numerous detailed theories about how neural networks encode and store memories. Two opposing notions suggest either that memory storage may rely primarily on physical rewiring of the network or could result from a functional state subserved by ongoing metabolism. We have initiated studies to address this issue in the cryptobiotic tardigrade, known as the “water bear.” Results from this study will help refine models of memory storage in humans and contribute to understanding of neural tissue preservation.
Sept. 29: Dr. Iosif Vaisman, Associate Director, School of Systems Biology at George Mason. “Building Bridges Between Genomics and Clinical Decision-making.” Quantitative data from genomic analysis can be used to build clinically relevant models capable of facilitating diagnostics and treatment as well as providing insights into the pathology of the disease. Such approaches rely on gene expression and mutation data from large cohorts of patients and utilizes machine learning algorithms to identify patterns that link an individual patient’s genomic profile with their clinical outcome. These patterns are used to construct predictive models which can inform decisions about treatment modalities.
Oct. 6: Dr. Kim ‘Avrama’ Blackwell, Professor, Krasnow Institute of Advanced Studies at George Mason. “What do Parkinson’s Disease, Addiction and Habit Learning Have in Common?” The answer is dopamine, which is a molecule produced by the brain in response to reward. Drug abuse strongly activates dopamine production, and thus addiction represents a very strong habit. In contrast, Parkinson’s disease is caused by a lack of dopamine. Dr. Blackwell will present research describing how learning causes changes in the brain cell connections and how the changes in the brain cell connections caused by dopamine depletion can cause the abnormal brain activity in Parkinson’s Disease.
Oct. 13: Dr. Robert Cressman, Assistant Professor, Krasnow Institute for Advanced Studies at George Mason: “Energy and Neuronal Function.” He will discuss the metabolic demands of neuronal function and, in particular, pathologies like epilepsy, migraines, and ischemia, and give a general overview of the state of our understanding of neuronal function, how it depends on a constant supply of energy, and the metabolic and transportthat provide the energy for the brain.

F802  Magnificent Aircraft That Have and Will Impact America’s National Security Policy

Tuesdays, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 20–Nov. 10
Four sessions
Fairfax Lord of Life
Instructor: Paul Murad
Since the late 1950s Lockheed Martin produced three very unusual aircraft. The U-2 was the center piece of the Cuban Missile Crisis. Its utility lasted from the sixties until recently. The SR-71 was a supersonic high altitude aircraft that provided needed intelligence in Vietnam, Iraq, and Serbia with its ability to provide an instant response to the changing winds of war. The
F-117 broke the mold by primarily using stealth. This stealth was a great unknown as no one knew how effective an unconventional subsonic aircraft could adequately perform. In the Iraqi war, F-117s were the only aircraft that attacked Baghdad. This course will cover these three unusual aircraft in three sessions and, in a fourth session, discuss Russian and Chinese stealth aircraft that represent future threats to our security.
Paul Murad has a BSME from Brooklyn Poly and an MSAE & Astro from NYU. As an aerodynamicist and mechanical engineer, he initially worked on the Apollo at NASA, Houston, and later, he was employed for 18 years as a contractor. He joined the government at DIA for 25 years to work on foreign technology topics. He has published 75 technical papers that covered research, weapon systems, fluid dynamics, levitation, gravitation, and pulsars and has also published 8 novels in Amazon.com.

 

F803 Advances in Healthcare

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 24–Oct. 15
Four sessions
Coordinator: Rala Stone
Sept. 24: Dr. Allen Blosser, board certified in gastroenterology with a clinical interest in colonoscopy, will speak on “Gastrointestinal Medicine: Colon & Rectal Cancer Screening and Indications for Colonoscopy.”
Oct. 1: Dr. Amir Moazzez, board certified surgeon with clinical interests in bariatric surgery and, gallbladder surgery, hernia surgery and treatments, minimally invasive surgery, and robotic surgery with Laura Royfe, MSRD, who holds a certificate in childhood, adolescent, and adult weight management. They will speak on “Diabetes/Nutrition/Weight Loss: Understanding the Role of Nutrition and Weight Loss in the Treatment and Outcome of Diabetes”.
Oct. 8: Dr. Jonathan Mobley specializes in urology with subspecialties in general urology and minimally invasive surgery. He will speak on “Prostate Cancer: the Evaluation and Treatment Options of Prostate Cancer.”
Oct. 15: Dr. Chris Silveri, board certified in orthopedic surgery, will speak on the “Spine: Chronic Back Pain and other Spine Related Issues.”

 

F804 History of Medicine: From Witchcraft to Robots

Thursdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 22–Nov. 12
Four sessions
Instructor: Rita E. Way
Part I: The fall term will focus on prehistoric medicine through the rise of modern medicine. The course will travel through time and history to learn how medicine has evolved from the days of witchcraft and medicine men to the era of modern medicine. We will highlight some of themes and key milestones in the story of medicine and discuss the development of ideas about the causes of disease from the Greco-Roman humoral theory up to the discoveries of germs and genes in the modern era.
Part II: The spring 2016 term will cover the rise of modern medicine and medical advances by a timeline. In addition, we will describe the ways wars affected medicine and the men and women who made medicine what it is today.
Rita E. Way studied at the Sacred Heart Hospital School of Nursing. She worked as a Medical-Surgical Nurse for twelve years, after which she joined a long term care company that owned and managed both skilled and assisted living nursing homes. Nursing and medicine have always been her passion.

 

F805  Beginner Chen-Style Tai Chi

Thursdays, 2:15–3:15, Sept. 24–Nov. 12
Note time and dates
Instructor: Jerry Cheng
Class Limit: 25
Tai chi, a form of martial arts that has been practiced for centuries, is meditation in motion that emphasizes balance, posture and concentration. This beginning class will focus on chen-style tai chi, which promotes health and fitness, strengthens the immune system, can relieve neck and back pain, corrects digestive problems, aids emotional and psychological well-being, relieves stress, and builds character. Please wear loose clothing, and plan to work in stocking feet or soft, flexible shoes.
Jerry Cheng was born in China and started his martial arts training when he was six. He studied under several famous Chinese martial arts masters, including grandmaster Sha GuoZheng, and won four gold medals at the 1997 Atlanta International Martial Arts Championship. He taught tai chi at the University of Georgia for six years and at the University of Texas for three years.

 

R806 Our Human Origins and Evolution (Canceled) 

Mondays, 9:40–11:05, Sept. 21–Oct. 12
Four sessions
Instructor: Keith B. Ward
Questions about human origins fascinate us. We will consider how concepts of evolutionary theory and evidence uncovered by paleo-anthropologists cast light on our origins. After discussing various ways that evolution works, we will consider how, starting with a species living in Africa about 6 million years ago, our ancestors gradually developed more and more of the characteristics we consider “human.” We will also discuss issues such as: Why are we the only “human” species left on the earth? Has human evolution stopped? What can analysis of our DNA tell us about where our ancestors lived during the last 10,000 years?
Keith Ward, PhD in Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, was a chemistry professor at the University of Wisconsin before serving the Departments of the Navy, Homeland Security, and Justice during his career with the Federal Government. He received the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Senior Professional and was recently inducted into the Academy of Distinguished Former Students by Texas A&M University. Since retiring as Senior Science Advisor to the Head of the FBI Laboratory, Keith has indulged his avocational interests in human evolution. He is a docent in the Hall of Human Origins at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History.

 

R807  Geology: Our Dynamic Planet and Our Environment (Part 3)

Tuesdays, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 27, Nov. 3, Nov. 10
Three sessions
Instructor and Coordinator: Jim McNeal
This series will focus on the surface of the earth and the interactions between humans and the environment, with an emphasis on local and regional issues. Potential topics include energy and mineral resources, fracking, climate change, the global carbon cycle, environmental degradation and restoration, recent geologic hazards or events, and the history of geology. Guest speakers will be from the US Geological Survey.
Oct. 27: Jim McNeal: “Past large geologic events.” The presentation will cover several little known, but important very large geologic events that will amaze you.
Nov. 3: Doug Duncan, Associate Coordinator, Energy Resources Program, USGS.
“Fracking: What is it? What does it do? Why is being done? What are the risks?”
Nov. 10: Jim McNeal “Gold: All You Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask.” This presentation will cover the history of gold, interesting facts about its occurrence and extraction, and the history of gold mining in Northern Virginia and surrounding areas.
Jim McNeal has a PhD in Geochemistry from Penn State. He was a research geologist/geochemist and research coordinator with the US Geological Survey for 36 years. He has coordinated two OLLI classes and is currently a scientist emeritus with the USGS and a docent at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. His primary interest is how geology and geochemistry play in current environmental issues.

 

R808  Gentle Yoga

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:45–11:45, Sept. 8–Oct. 1, Oct. 13–Oct. 22
Reston Community Center, Lake Anne
Note days and times
No class Oct. 6 and Oct. 8
Twelve sessions
Instructor: Reston Community Center Staff
Class Limit: 5
This traditional yoga class is designed for senior adults and incorporates both stretching and strength postures while focusing on balance. Participants will enjoy increased strength, flexibility, balance, coordination, and energy in a gently challenging way. This class incorporates standing poses as well as poses on the floor. Participants should be comfortable getting up and down from the floor. Please bring a blanket, pillow, or beach towel to class. A class fee of $60 is payable to OLLI at the time of registration. Registration for this class is on a first come, first served basis. Those registering will also need to complete a Reston Community Center registration/waiver form and take it to class the first day. The form can be found at http://www.restoncommunitycenter.com/docs/default-source/forms/registration-form.pdf?sfvrsn=2. Registration is not finalized until a completed RCC waiver is received.

R809  Tai Chi Chuan – The Eight Ways

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:30–12:30, Sept. 8–Oct. 22
Reston Community Center, Lake Anne
Note days and times
Fourteen sessions
Instructor: RCC Staff
Class Limit: 7
Learn eight simple movements derived from the Tai Chi Yang Style Short Form by Master Cheng ManCh’ing. Each movement is a separate and complete unit that can be practiced by itself independently of the others, and conveys all the benefits of Tai Chi. Emphasis is on balance, relaxation, and ease of movement. A class fee of $70 is payable to OLLI at the time of registration. Registration for this class is on a first come, first served basis. Those registering will also need to complete a Reston Community Center registration/waiver form and take it to class the first day. The form can be found at http://www.restoncommunitycenter.com/docs/default-source/forms/registration-form.pdf?sfvrsn=2. Registration is not finalized until a completed RCC waiver is received.

 

R810 Gentle Yoga

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:45–11:45, Nov. 3–Nov. 24, Dec. 1–Dec. 15
Reston Community Center, Lake Anne
Note days and times
No class Nov. 26
Twelve sessions
Instructor: RCC Staff
Class Limit: 5
This is a repeat of class R808. Registration for this class is on a first come, first served basis.

 

900 Other Topics

F901 Trip Tales

Mondays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 21–Nov. 9
Coordinator: Tom Hady
Sept. 21: John and Peggy Woods took a “People to People” trip to Cuba before the latest relaxation of relations. Hear about their experiences as they interacted with people across all walks of Cuban life, including some with strong feelings about the US and their government.
Sept. 28: Alana Lukes went to Hawaii: Oahu, Kauai, Maui, & Hawaii including helicopter rides along Kauai’s coast and over Hawaii’s volcano.
Oct. 5: Dick Young and his son Dan took a cruise from Valparaiso, Chile to Buenos Aires in 2003. At sea, they traveled around Cape Horn near the track of Dick’s great-grandfather’s route to the 1849 California gold rush; in ports, they adventured independently.
Oct. 12: Sue Roose will tell of her adventures in the Lake District and Northumberland County in northern England.
Oct. 19: Sandy Hoch travelled to Turkey and experienced its history, jaw-dropping landscapes, sun-splashed Mediterranean beaches, quaint seaside towns, glistening cities, colorful bazaars, whirling dervishes, the fairy chimneys of Cappadocia, underground cities and more.
Oct. 26: Tom & Marilyn Hady travelled to the Albuquerque Balloon Festival. Along with 500+ balloons in a mass ascension and other events at the festival, see Old Albuquerque and other sights in New Mexico.
Nov. 2: Katie Mitchell went to Morocco. Part 1: Casablanca to Fez. See the blue/ white town in the Rif Mountains, visit a sheep auction near Tetuon, tour ancient medinas, souks, and kasbahs, and see a royal palace, a water carrier in traditional costume, ancient dye vats, and riad interiors.
Nov. 9: Part 2 of Katie Mitchell’s Moroccan adventure: The Middle Atlas to the Sahara, and Marrakech. Snow, desert camping, camels, deep gorges, mountains, and Hollywood movie settings. Hear about baths in a hammam, Berber carpets, and Churchill’s Moroccan retreat.

 

F902  Refresher Bridge

Wednesdays, 11:45–1:15, Sept. 23–Nov. 11
Tallwood
Instructor: Gordon Canyock
Class limit : 20
Review some of the major changes in standard American bidding since the 1960s, including 25-point “golden games,” 15-17 point no trump openers, 5-card major openers, and weak two bids. The course is designed for members who have previously played bridge and might be interested in joining the Bridge Club or for those Bridge Club members who feel they could use a refresher. Each class will be part lecture, part practical exercise in which you will be able to play duplicate bridge hands geared to that week’s lesson. It is recommended that participants plan to attend all eight sessions. There is a $11 materials fee payable within one week of enrollment acceptance.
Gordon Canyock has been the coordinator of the Bridge Club since its founding and has taught Beginning Bridge at OLLI three times and Play of the Hand twice. He is not an expert, but is an enthusiast of this challenging game.

 

 

Special Events

 Fall for the Book

OLLI will join George Mason in celebrating this annual festival of literature. A complete list of events may be found at fallforthebook.org. For events requiring bus transportation, service will be provided from Tallwood 45 minutes prior to the event, and there will also be return service after the event.

 

951 Fall for the Book: T.J. Turner, Lincoln’s Bodyguard

Sunday, 2:00, Sept. 27
Cascades Library
T.J. Turner’s novel imagines an alternate, dystopian version of American history where President Lincoln is saved from assassination. It is a story that is ultimately about forgiveness, culminating in an answer to an intriguing question: What would America under our greatest president look like? TJ Turner is a novelist, an historian, a research scientist for the US Air Force, and a Federal Agent as a reserve member of the Air Force Office of Special Investigations. He graduated from Cornell University, served three tours in Afghanistan, and was awarded the Bronze Star Medal in 2013. Cascades Library is located at 21030 Whitfield Place Potomac Falls, VA 20165. Sponsored by Loudoun County Public Library.

 

952 Fall for the Book: Robert Poole, Section 60

Monday, 7:00, Sept. 28
Kings Park Library
Robert Poole chronicled the history of Arlington National Cemetery in the book On Hallowed Ground, and returns to Arlington in Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery: Where War Comes Home. In this new book, Poole looks at America’s last decade of war, the lives of American soldiers killed in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, and the families they left behind. Kings Park Library is located at 9000 Burke Lake Road, Burke VA. 22015
Sponsored by Kings Park Library Friends.

 

953 Mason Reads: Ernest Gaines, A Lesson Before Dying

Monday, 7:30, Sept. 28
EagleBank Arena
CUE bus will be at Tallwood at 6:45 for transport to EagleBank Arena and will return to Tallwood after the event.
Fall for the Book joins George Mason University in presenting Ernest Gaines, the author of this year’s all-freshman Mason Reads, A Lesson Before Dying. It is the powerful story of a man sentenced to death in 1940s Louisiana and the teacher who worked with him. A Lesson Before Dying speaks to both the history of and the current state of race relations in our country, as well as the value and importance of education and knowledge for all. Gaines will discuss the book and his work with George Mason professor Keith Clark. Sponsored by the Friends of the George Mason Regional Library.

 

954 Fall for the Book: Keith Clark, On Ernest J. Gaines’s A Lesson Before Dying

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 30
Fairfax Lord of Life
Following his conversation with Ernest J. Gaines, Professor Keith Clark, author of Black Manhood in James Baldwin, Ernest J. Gaines, and August Wilson, will lead a discussion of Mr. Gaines’s 1993 novel A Lesson Before Dying. The powerful story of a man sentenced to death in 1940s Louisiana and the teacher who works with him, speaks to both the history and current state of race relations in our country, and to the value and importance of education and knowledge for all people.

 

955 Fall for the Book: Terry Alford, Fortune’s Fool

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Oct. 2
Tallwood
Terry Alford’s new book Fortune’s Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth, is a definitive look at the life of one of the most infamous figures in American history, the man who assassinated Lincoln. Alford gives a complete portrait of John Wilkes Booth’s life, from his childhood, to his acting career, and describes the path that led him to Ford’s Theatre. Sponsored by Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.

 

956  Fall for the Book: Tim O’Brien on the 25th Anniversary of The Things They Carried

Saturday, 6:30, Oct. 3
George Mason Harris Theater
CUE bus will be at Tallwood at 5:45 for transport to the Johnson Center and will return to Tallwood after the event.
Tim O’Brien, author of The Things They Carried, received the Fairfax Prize for literary excellence. The Things They Carried is a collection of short stories that defined the experience of American soldiers in the Vietnam War. Tim O’Brien will be discussing his writing, the impact of his most famous book, and the way it speaks to a new generation of veterans with Alan Cheuse, NPR reviewer and George Mason professor. Sponsored by George Mason University Libraries.

 

Additional Special Events

 957 “I’m So Glad We Had this Time Together”: A Tribute to Carol Burnett

Monday, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 21
Loudoun
Coordinator: Martha Powers
Who can forget her Tarzan yell, that goodnight tug on the ear for her grandmother, or the Scarlett O’Hara dress (complete with curtain rod)? Carol Burnett is an amazing actress, comedian, writer, singer–and above all else, an American treasure. This class will feature an A&E Biography video about Carol Burnett’s life, and then we’ll view several clips from The Carol Burnett Show.
Martha Powers is an OLLI member who likes to laugh and to share fun moments with other OLLI folks.

 

958 The Importance of Bee Health

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Sept. 25
Tallwood
Coordinator: Florence Adler with Kathleen Curtis
This lecture will explore the fascinating social structure, intense cooperation, and organization within honey bee colonies. A special focus will be on the health challenges which are accountable for killing an increasingly high number of native bees and in managed bee colonies each year. We will examine the effects that the lack of bees have on the beekeeping and pollination industries worldwide as farmers adjust to the shortage to provide the food we want at a cost we can afford.
German Perilla, originally from Bogota, Colombia, earned his BS in Biology from University of Maryland and an MS in Sustainable Development from George Mason University. While in Colombia, he worked on pollination projects using Africanized bees, taught apiculture and business skills to refugees, and pioneered the management of the Varroa Mite parasite. At the invitation of the Israeli government, he travelled the country advising on beekeeping as a profitable enterprise. Currently, Professor Perilla serves as the Director of the Honey Bee Initiative at George Mason teaching a number of courses, including an integrative field studies course conducted in the Peruvian Amazon fostering beekeeping as a community-driven development tool in other South American countries.

 

959  J. Edgar Hoover: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Monday, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 28
Loudoun
Instructor: David Heymsfeld
During his 48 years as FBI Director, J. Edgar Hoover developed the nation’s premier law enforcement agency, staffed by highly qualified agents with access to the best available technology. The FBI was at the forefront of law enforcement, from depression-era bank robberies to Nazi and communist espionage. Through a sophisticated public relations and press program, Hoover succeeded in creating a highly favorable public image of the FBI as the agency that “always gets its man.” At the same time, some of Hoover’s programs employed illegal activities, including wiretapping, burglaries, harassment, and violations of the civil liberties of individuals and organizations of which he disapproved. Hoover’s FBI also developed investigatory files on individuals who were not suspected of illegal activities. The files were used to intimidate politicians and journalists who might be opposed to the FBI. Hoover’s FBI was used by certain presidents to gather political intelligence against their opponents. This presentation will examine all sides of Hoover’s legacy.
David Heymsfeld, an OLLI member, served on the professional staff of the House Transportation Committee for 35 years. He has long been interested in modern American history and is a volunteer guide for the Newseum.

 

960 Japan-A Safe Haven for Jews in World War Two

Wednesdays, 2:15–3:40, Sept. 30–Oct. 7
Two sessions
Rose Gallery at Reston Community Center Lake Anne
Instructor: Ben Gold
Shortly prior to and during World War II, tens of thousands of Jewish refugees were resettled in the Japanese Empire. But wasn’t Japan an ally of Nazi Germany? Didn’t Hitler want the Japanese to round up their Jewish population? Why did the Japanese refuse? And why was Chiune Sugihara, a Japanese diplomat who served as Vice-Consul for the empire of Japan in Lithuania, officially recognized by Israel and given the honor of being named “Righteous Among Nations”.
For instructor information see R704.

 

961 Super Insulation & Solar Power

Monday, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 5
Loudoun
Instructors: Rich and Marian Taschler
Rich and Marian Taschler, whose home has twice been included in the Department of Energy’s Solar Home Tours, are self-taught do-it-yourselfers who will describe their success story in installing super insulation that cost them only $300. They also designed and installed their own solar hot water system. Their home has an Energy Star rating of 9.9 out of a possible 10.
Rich and Marian Taschler are OLLI members who correctly predicted a rise in energy costs after the first oil crunch in 1973 and set about creating a program to beat future costs using solar energy and super insulation.

962 The Art of Storytelling in Sound: Sibelius’ 2nd Symphony and His Debt to Beethoven

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Oct. 9
Fairfax Lord of Life
Instructor: Christopher Zimmerman
This is a lecture on Sibelius’ Symphony No. 2 and how it relates to, and was influenced by, the symphonic craft of Beethoven. No pre-requisite is necessary other than a love of music and an interest in sound. Homework: listen to Sibelius’ Symphony No. 2 and Beethoven’s Symphonies Nos. 3 and 5.
Christopher Zimmerman is in his sixth season as the music director of the Fairfax Symphony Orchestra (FSO). He received his MM from University of Michigan in orchestral conducting. A champion of contemporary music, he has conducted more than 25 local and world premieres. Maestro Zimmerman also guest-conducts around the world and is an artistic director with the Eleazar de Carvalho Festival in Brazil and the Wintergreen Performing Arts Festival in Virginia. In addition, he is the Music Director of the Fargo-Moorhead Symphony (ND) and Artistic Director/Principal Conductor of the American Youth Philharmonic of Washington, DC.

963 Is Your Money Still Safe?

Monday, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 12
Loudoun
Instructor: Robert Oshinsky
During the 1920s and early 1930s, thousands of banks in America failed. As a result, millions of Americans lost their life savings, and the Great Depression began. As a response, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation was created in 1933. The purpose of the FDIC is simple: insure the deposits in banks so customers’ money will be safe. The 1980s brought the Savings and Loan Crisis, and 2007 brought the Subprime Crisis. During these crises, over 2,100 institutions failed, but not one cent of insured deposits were lost. How does the FDIC work? How does the FDIC maintain an insurance fund to prepare for bank failures? Plan to attend this event if you would like to learn about the FDIC and get the answer to the question: “Is my money still safe?”.
Robert C. Oshinsky holds a BA in Mathematics and Economics from Connecticut College, an MBA in Finance and Investments from The George Washington University, and a MS in Finance from The George Washington University.
He is Senior Financial Analyst at the FDIC. Mr. Oshinsky has 24 years of experience as a bank regulator, working at the Resolution Trust Corporation, the Federal Reserve Board, and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Since 2007, he has been responsible for the Risk Related Premium System.

964 Good Leads on Good Reads

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 14
Fairfax Lord of Life
Instructor: Kathy Luetkemeier, Cathy Noonan
Librarians from the Kings Park Community Library, Fairfax County Public Library, will discuss new titles, as well as some old favorites. We will bring a large variety of adult fiction and nonfiction books. In a 3 to 5 minute presentation of each we will give some information on the author and describe the book. We will present titles and trends from the genres of mystery, romance, historic and science fiction, and fantasy. Nonfiction titles will include biography, history, travel, and other current best sellers. With the holidays approaching, we will also present some attractive books suitable for gift giving, such as cookbooks, art books, and coffee table books. We can suggest titles to give to grandchildren. More titles will be provided in booklists for such genres as spy stories, horror, psychological thrillers, police procedurals, different formats of mystery, humor, and other examples of popular fiction. Finally, we will explain the library system for placing and picking up holds, and will answer questions about availability.

965 Gilbert and Sullivan Operettas-Part I

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 14
Rose Gallery at Reston Community Center, Lake Anne
Instructor: James W. Keefe
The century and a quarter that has passed since W. S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan first captured the appreciation of London, New York, and the whole English-speaking world has hardly diminished their fame. Their partnership ended in the 1890s but their successful works stand, with Oscar Wilde’s plays, as the most durable theatrical compositions of the period. G&S collaborated on 13 or 15 works, depending on whom you ask, with 9 of them very successful. In this presentation we will concentrate on their earlier successes such as H. M. S. Pinafore and The Pirates of Penzance, leaving their later big hits like The Mikado to G&S Part II in the spring.
Dr. James W. Keefe is a former choral music teacher, high school principal, university professor of education, and a national educational association director of research. He received his PhD in educational curriculum and research from the University of Southern California. In 1995 he retired from the National Association of Secondary Principals. He has conducted high school and college choruses, as well as church and boys’ choirs, and is currently a member of the Reston Chorale, in which he sings tenor and arranges some of the music for the group.

966 Ten Advantages of Aging for Psychological Health

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Oct. 16
Fairfax Lord of Life
Instructors: Jerome Short, Diane Wagner
Americans are living longer than ever. In this presentation, we will describe multiple advantages of aging and life experience for maintaining and increasing physical and psychological health. This is an opportunity to learn about the latest research findings on daily and weekly strategies in health behaviors, social relationships, intellectual, and cultural activities and emotional well-being.
Jerome Short, PhD, is an associate professor of psychology at George Mason and a licensed clinical psychologist in Virginia. His teaching and research focus on promoting mental health and preventing psychological disorders.
Diane Wagner, MA, is a sixth-year doctoral student in clinical psychology. Her interests are centered on promoting psychological well-being in older adults.

967 Loudoun Election Issues

Monday, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 19
Loudoun
Moderator: Ray Beery
In November the Virginia elections will be upon us. To help us understand the issues, we have invited the two candidates for Ashburn District Supervisor to give us their positions. Interestingly, both are graduates of the US Air Force Academy. Ralph Buona, Republican, is the incumbent. He is Telos Corporation’s senior vice president of corporate business development, where he is responsible for overseeing the expansion of Telos business units. In March 2015, he became Vice-Chairman of the Board of Supervisors. Mike Turner, Democrat, is the challenger. He has served as a senior executive at The American Red Cross, Wounded Warrior Project, and Mental Health America. He studied the top military family support programs in the nation for an understanding of the urgent mental health needs of the nation’s military community.
Moderator: Ray Beery is a member of the OLLI Board of Directors. He is a frequent teacher, leading the Family History Workshop this term. His undergraduate degree is in Political Science. He follows public policy issues avidly.

 

968 An Extraordinary Young Man: The Early Years of George Washington

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 21
Fairfax Lord of Life
Coordinator: Velma Berkey
Relatively little is known about George Washington’s youth, and it has led to many myths and misrepresentations about him. Professor Henriques will closely examine what we do know about George Washington’s first 21 years. While no one could have imagined the unique role that he was to play in our nation’s founding, Professor Henriques demonstrates that Washington was no ordinary young man.
Dr. Peter Henriques received his PhD in history from the University of Virginia and is Professor of History Emeritus at George Mason. He is the author of Realistic Visionary: A Portrait of George Washington. As a recipient of the George Washington Memorial Award from the George Washington Masonic Memorial Association in 2012, Dr. Henriques presented the Distinguished Lecture Series at Colonial Williamsburg. His latest endeavor is a work in progress, America’s Atlas: The Leadership of George Washington.

969 Fibonacci: Great Mathematician of the Middle Ages

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 21
Rose Gallery at Reston Community Center, Lake Anne
Instructor: Michael Flicker
Leonardo Pisano (Fibonacci) was the most important European mathematician of the middle ages and the world’s greatest number theorist from the time of Diophantus (250 CE) to Fermat (1600 CE). He was the link with Europe between the mathematics of the Greeks and Arabs. In this class we will discuss his main works: The Book of Calculation in which Hindu-Arabic numbers are introduced to the European mercantile class, Practical Geometry, and the Book of Squares, which is Fibonacci’s most creative work. In 1225 Fibonacci was invited by the Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire to court in Pisa where he was challenged by the court mathematician to solve three problems, which we will discuss.
Michael Flicker, an OLLI member who holds a PhD in physics, has been interested in the history of mathematics since his high school days.

 

970  The Rise (Again) of Charismatic Catholicism and Protestantism in Latin America

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Oct. 23
Tallwood
Instructor: Garry Sparks
Despite various efforts to import Protestant Christianity into Latin America since the early colonial period, the growth of “evangelical” Christian populations did not have any significant impact until the 1960s. Specifically, this growth pertained to charismatic Protestantism when, ironically, historical mainline Protestantism was at its height in the US and was critically reconsidering its history in Latin America. Scholars have proposed various theories to explain this shift and growth. These range from the covert support in US foreign policy of right-wing Protestantism in the region, local reaction to left-wing or Marxist liberation theology, and similarities between Pentecostalism’s doctrine of the Spirit with indigenous “spirituality.” However, the understudied growth of charismatic Catholicism that occurred with the emergence of both liberation theologies and evangelicalism in Latin America provokes a rethinking of a style of Christian worship. That style now cuts across traditional denominational boundaries, the new political activism of indigenous peoples, and the rise of charismatic Catholicism in the US It is due, in part, to its importation, not from the north to the south, but vice versa with late migration.
Garry Sparks earned a PhD in Theology and Religious Studies from the University of Chicago. He is an Assistant Professor in Mason’s Religious Studies Department. His research and teaching interests focus on an anthropological (socio-cultural and linguistic) and ethnohistorical understandings of theological production in the Americas, particularly among indigenous peoples.

 

971 More I Cannot Wish You: The Songs of Frank Loesser

Saturday, 9:30–12:00, Oct. 31
Tallwood
Instructor: Dan Sherman
Frank Loesser started as a singer and songwriter, writing both for Hollywood in the 1930s and the military during World War II. His career continued after the war; he wrote both lyrics and music to several great Broadway shows, including Guys and Dolls. Dan Sherman will tell the story of Frank Loesser’s varied career through a multimedia presentation that combines rare audio and video clips.
Dan Sherman has presented OLLI classes on many of the great American theatre composers, most recently Stephen Sondheim and Kurt Weill.

 

972  An Afternoon [Wasted] with Tom Lehrer

Monday, 11:50–1:15, Oct. 26
Loudoun
Instructor: Marianne Metz
Harvard mathematics professor by day, wicked song satirist by night–that was Tom Lehrer in the 1950s. Lehrer paired lilting melodies with darkly humorous lyrics. Irreverent to the nth degree, he liked to quote reviews such as “Mr. Lehrer’s muse is not fettered by such inhibiting factors as taste.” (New York Times, 1958). Our class session will range from “Fight Fiercely, Harvard” (1953) to “Silent E” (a song Lehrer wrote for the PBS children’s show “The Electric Company” in the 1970s). Along the way we’ll hear such fan favorites as “The Masochism Tango,” “The Vatican Rag,” “When You Are Old and Gray,” “We Will All Go Together When We Go,” and, of course, “Poisoning Pigeons in the Park.” We’ll view a full-length concert that Lehrer performed in Oslo in 1967. Prepare to be delighted!
Marianne Metz, is a long-time fan of Tom Lehrer. She also enjoys classical musicals (as does Tom Lehrer) and has shared her enthusiasm in OLLI classes on Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire, and American songwriters.

 

973 The Greatest Musicals of All Time

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Oct. 28
Fairfax Lord of Life
Instructor: Luke Frazier
The Greatest Musicals of All Time is a class that explores some of musical theater’s most treasured shows and highlights the stories of their authors and performers.
Luke Frazier is the principal pops conductor of the Fairfax Symphony Orchestra and founder and conductor of the National Broadway Chorus. He maintains an active conducting schedule across the nation. More information on Luke can be found at www.LukeFrazierMusic.com.

 

974 The Greatest Musicals of All Time

Monday. 11:50–1:15, Nov. 2
Loudoun
Instructor: Luke Frazier
This is a repeat of 973.

 

975 The Greatest Musicals of All Time

Wednesday, 2:15–3:40, Nov. 4
Rose Gallery at Reston Community Center, Lake Anne
Instructor: Luke Frazier
This is a repeat of 973.

 

976 Hello, Alice Faye, Hello!

Friday, 1:30–3:30, Nov. 6
Note time
Tallwood
Moderator: Marianne Metz
Born in New York in 1915, Alice Faye was brought to Hollywood by an early employer who mentored and championed her: Rudy Vallee. She was still a teenager. By the time she was 20, Alice had attracted legions of fans with her good looks and warm, sultry singing voice. She could make any song sound appealing. And when some of our best songwriters began writing for Faye, she delivered their creations with such warmth, clarity, expressiveness, and overall musical intelligence that listeners never forgot them. Between 1934 and 1945 Alice Faye was the musical queen of Twentieth Century Fox (sometimes co-starring with the studio’s musical princess, Shirley Temple). Alice starred in about 30 Fox films before she walked away from it all at age 30. But she still has millions of fans. Now, in her centennial year, we offer a chance to see and hear why so many adore Alice. Come watch Hello, Frisco, Hello, made during World War II, in which Alice unforgettably introduced the song “You’ll Never Know.” The film also stars John Payne and Jack Oakie, but it’s Alice Faye who will enchant you!
Marianne Metz, your moderator for this film screening, is co-chair of OLLI’s Art/Music Program Planning Group and is one of Alice Faye’s many admirers.

 

977 The B-29: The Plane That Ended World War II

Monday, 11:50–1:15, Nov. 9
Loudoun
Instructor: Eric Forman
On August 6 and 9, 1945, the United States dropped atomic bombs on Japan. Six days later, Japan agreed to surrender, and World War II was brought to an end. While much has been written and said about the two bombs, comparatively little attention has been devoted to the remarkable aircraft that carried them: the B-29 Superfortress. The technology that enabled the B-29 to carry exceptionally heavy bomb loads far greater distances than any other bombers of the era made it the most complex, sophisticated, and expensive aircraft of the Second World War. This lecture will explore the design, manufacturing, and operational challenges of the B-29, with particular emphasis on the atomic bomb missions.
Eric Forman holds a PhD in International Studies from Johns Hopkins University. He is a docent at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum Udvar-Hazy Center.

 

978 A Veterans Day Tribute: Honor Flight

Wednesday, 1:45–3:45, Nov. 11
Note time
Tallwood
Coordinator: Martha Powers
Please join us for this very special Veterans Day event. We will be viewing the award-winning documentary Honor Flight, about the nonprofit program that flies thousands of WWII veterans to Washington, DC to visit the World War II Memorial. These trips are called “Honor Flights” and for the veterans, who are in their late 80s and early 90s, it’s often the last trip of their lives. (Even if you never cry at the movies, bring Kleenex!) Joining us for this event are OLLI members John Nash, Toni Acton, and John Acton, who volunteer with Honor Flight at Dulles International Airport, where they greet veterans as they arrive for their whirlwind tours of our nation’s capital. OLLI veterans will be recognized at this event, and we invite them to attend so that we may honor them.

 

979  2016 Presidential Campaigns: How Are They Shaping Up?

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Nov. 13
Fairfax Lord of Life
Instructor: Helen Desfosses
As a lead-in to one of the wildest and most crowded election years ever, this lecture will examine the fundamentals of a good campaign. Among these are: time, money, campaign management, volunteer recruitment, candidate likeability, skills and viability, message development for paid and free media, and campaign strategy. All are ways to get the all-important 50% of the votes plus 1.
Dr. Helen Desfosses has waged and won many campaigns herself and has advised and analyzed many more.

 

980 A Trip to the Legato School

Friday, 1:30, Oct. 2
Carpool
Instructor: Bob Coffin
Event limit: 30
Visit a real one room schoolhouse, replete with all the artifacts of the day. Hear about its history. Browse McGuffey’s Readers, Webster’s Blueback Speller, and experiment with period writing materials, all while a docent leads you through a typical day in the life of an 1878 student. Check out what was “important” in education back then, who went to school, and when. Added bonus: a half hour “You Are There” Current Events class styled to the exact day of your visit. Find out what was considered to be relevant in Fairfax 1878. NOTE: Attendees will not be required to bring firewood, buckets of water or clean the privy, despite how rambunctious they may become. The Legato School is located on Route 123 in Fairfax City. Directions and a registration roster will be emailed so that those who wish to carpool can contact one another.
Bob Coffin, a retired Fairfax County history teacher, is a docent at The Legato School—which is run by the Retired Fairfax County Teachers.

 

981  A Visit to Montpelier, Home of the Father of the Constitution, Architect of the Bill of Rights, & America’s “First Lady”

Friday, 9:00–5:00, Oct. 9
Bus trip
Coordinator: Florence Adler
Tour limit: 53
Montpelier was the home of James Madison, so-called Father of the Constitution, architect of the Bill of Rights and fourth President of the United States. It was also the home of Dolley Madison, America’s first “First Lady.” At the beginning of our visit, we will be shown a brief introductory movie on Madison. There is much to see and do at Montpelier. Over the past 1 ½ years, the upstairs library and James and Dolley Madison’s bedchamber have undergone a complete restoration, returning them in size, structure, and furnishings to the 1820’s. As time allows, we can visit the archaeology lab, archaeological dig sites, the Madison family and enslaved community cemeteries, the Annie DuPont formal garden, the South Yard (site of the domestic slave quarters), the Gilmore Cabin (a freedman’s farm), the galleries, and the museum shop. There are picnic tables behind the Visitor Center where we can eat the box lunches arranged for our group prior to our visit.
Please note: the mansion tour involves a fair amount of walking and standing. The bus will leave promptly at 9:00 from Fair Oaks Mall, Parking Lot No. 57, outside the circular road near Macy’s. Please be on the bus no later than 8:45. The fee of $57 payable to OLLI within one week of enrollment acceptance, covers the Signature Tour at Montpelier, box lunches, bus fare, and driver gratuity. When requesting this event, please indicate your choice of box lunch from the following sandwiches: tuna salad, roasted vegetables, roasted turkey, or ham and swiss cheese.

 

982 Loudoun Wine Tour Redux

Friday, 10:00–4:30, Oct. 16
Bus Trip
Coordinator: Bernie Oppel
Tour limit: 25
The Spring OLLI wine trip was so well received and the wait list so extensive that we are offering another exquisite Loudoun County wine country bus tour during the beautiful Fall season. We will begin our tasting experience in the historic pre-Civil War red barn at Willowcroft Farm Vineyards. Atop Mt. Gilead, with its panoramic view of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Willowcroft is the oldest winery in Loudoun County. After a delicious seated lunch at the Magnolias at the Mill restaurant in nearby Purcellville, the tasting experience continues at the historic Hillsborough Vineyards, with a spectacular hillside view of the surrounding countryside. Anticipate at least a dozen different tastings overall. A fee of $59, payable to OLLI within one week of enrollment acceptance, covers bus, taxes, driver tip and wine tastings. Lunch selections will be provided later and billed individually by the restaurant at an average cost of $25. The bus departs Lot 57 at Fair Oaks Mall (in front of Mantech Corp) at 10:00, so please be at the bus by 9:45. Estimated time of return is 4:30.

 

983 The Organ: The King of Instruments!

Friday, 8:00, Oct. 23
Note time
Saint John Neumann Catholic Church, Reston
Carpool
Coordinator: Rosemary McDonald
Who gave the organ this title? What makes it the king of instruments? How does the organ differ from other keyboard instruments? Come find out! Come to hear Bach and Mendelssohn; hear dances and bird calls. Concert organist, David Lang, will present a pre-concert discussion on the workings of the organ, followed by a performance. The concert is free, open to the public, and will be held at Saint John Neumann Catholic Church, 11900 Lawyers Road, Reston. Directions and a registration roster will be emailed so that those who wish to carpool can contact one another.
David Lang, Artistic Director of the Reston Chorale, has gained prominence as a leading professional accompanist, vocal coach, concert organist, and choral conductor. He received his Bachelor of Music degree in both choral music education (grades K-12) and sacred music from Appalachian State University in Boone, NC and his Master of Music degree in organ performance from the University of Louisville.

 

984 The Mystery of Tallwood House

Friday, 10:00–1:00, Oct. 30
Church of the Good Shepherd
Coordinators: Wendy Campbell, Kathie West
Be entertained by the Murder Mystery group as they once again entrance you. This time they will be accompanied by The Tallwood Trio and Nancy Riley, the vocalist. It is Halloween time, and haunting is at its best. Come and visit with the souls at the Haunted House. You will be fed lunch by Santini’s Ghouls. Enjoy the sounds and music that pushes the mystery along. Bring your friendly ghoul! A portion of the $35 charge, payable to OLLI after notification of acceptance, will be used for enhancements to OLLI facilities under the direction of Member Services Committee.

 

985  Arthur Miller’s The Crucible

Saturday, 2:00, Oct. 31
George Mason Harris Theater
Coordinator: Florence Adler
The Crucible, a play written in 1953 by Arthur Miller, is directed by Howard Vincent Kurtz, Professor of theater and Maggie Rodgers, a senior performance major from the School of Theater at Mason. The play is a dramatized and partially fictionalized story of the Salem witch trials that took place in the Province of Massachusetts Bay during 1692 and 1693. Miller wrote The Crucible as an allegory of McCarthyism, during an era when the United States government was blacklisting accused communists. The playwright’s timeless parable concerning madness and superstition in a tightly-knit community is brought vividly to life in this newly conceived production. There will be a post performance discussion with the directors and members of the company. Tickets are $15, payable to OLLI within one week of enrollment acceptance.

 

986 A Russian Journalist’s Perspective

Thursday, 9:40-11:05, Oct. 22
Tallwood, 4210 Roberts Road, Fairfax
Instructor: Pavel Koshkin

Russian journalist, Pavel Koshkin will bring a journalist’s point of view on Russia’s foreign and domestic policy, U.S.-Russia relations in the context of the Ukrainian crisis and the Syrian conflict (Russia’s recent overtures against ISIS in Syria are especially important for its relations with the U.S. and its domestic security). In addition, he will talk about post-Crimea changes and ideological shifts in the Russian society. This will be set in the context of Russian media, informational wars and well-balanced journalism (or how it is understood in Russia). He will explain the goals and challenges of Russia Direct, in particular the difficulties of straddling between two extremes and keeping a healthy balance in coverage.
Pavel Koshkin is the Executive Editor, Russia for Russia Direct. He is an experienced journalist in both Russian domestic and foreign policy issues. A graduate of Lomonosov Moscow State University, Koshkin has contributed to a number of Russian and foreign media outlets, including Russia Profile, Kommersant and the Moscow bureau of the BBC. In addition to his work at Russia Direct, he is currently working toward a Ph.D. in international journalism at Lomonosov Moscow State University.

 

987 Wine & Cheese Tasting

Thursday, 12:30-2:30, Dec. 10
Church of the Good Shepherd
Instructors: Bob Coffin, Doris Bloch
Event limit: 50

Your OLLI Cheese Team (Bob Coffin & Doris Bloch) is teaming up with Josh (from The Wine Outlet) to provide a special treat as we enter the Holiday Season! Enjoy 8 cheeses and 8 matching wines, each with all the usual “accouterments”, plus maybe a few new palate-pleasers (Doris’ Praline Pecans are still Primo, Bob’s debuting his Asiago Polenta Bread, and who knows what else may tickle their fancy.) We’ll be featuring Smoky Gouda; Triple Crème Brie; nutty Grana Padano; piquant Gorgonzola (w/ a touch of honey, so good); aged Cheddar; “real” Swiss cheese; and more. Josh is bringing a mix of Reds, Whites and Sparkling wines to complement the cheeses. Extras Bonus, ALL the wines he’s supplying can be bought for UNDER $10! Plus, Bob & Josh will be passing along “tidbits” about the individual wines and cheeses. Learn a little, munch and sip a lot—and the 8th offering is dessert! A class fee of $30 to be paid at the time of registration will cover the cost of the food.
Bob Coffin, an OLLI member, is a retired U.S. Army foreign area officer and Fairfax County high school teacher. For 10 years he taught a quick and easy cooking class for alternative high school students. Bob also ran fundraising auctions donating 7-course dinners served in your home.
Doris Bloch is a food enthusiast and loves to introduce people to new tastes and unusual combinations. She was one of the founders of the OLLI Cooking Club.

 

1001BT  Remembering Ol’ Blue Eyes: A Sinatra Centenary (Part 3)

Tuesday, 10:00–12:00, Sept. 1
Note time
Tallwood
Moderator: Marianne Metz
Having sampled Frank Sinatra’s early movie musicals this summer, we now see him in an entirely different light. In the 1953 drama From Here to Eternity, Sinatra played Private Angelo Maggio, a role that won him an Oscar. Also starring in this steamy story of soldiers stationed in Hawaii were Burt Lancaster, Montgomery Clift, Deborah Kerr, Donna Reed, and Ernest Borgnine. We will see From Here to Eternity in its entirety.
Marianne Metz, your moderator for this film screening, is an OLLI member and a lover of classic films.

 

1002BT  AARP Safe Driver One–Day Class

Tuesday, 9:30–4:00, Sept. 15
Note time
Tallwood
Instructor: Manny Pablo
Class limit: 30
Cars have changed. So have traffic rules, driving conditions, and the roads you travel. Brush up on driving skills with a driver safety course. Learn the current rules of the road, defensive driving techniques, and how to operate more safely. Learn to manage and accommodate common age-related changes in vision, hearing, and reaction time. Learn about blind spots, following distances, changing lanes, turns at intersections, safety belts, air bags, anti-lock brakes, new technologies, ways to monitor your own and others’ driving skills and capabilities, effects of medications on driving, distractions like eating, smoking, and cell-phone use. Cost: $15 for AARP members, $20 for non-members. Note: this is an experiment to compress an eight-hour course into one day. Bring check and membership card, a lunch and snacks. The good news: certification entitles you to a three-year discount from your Virginia insurance carrier.
Manuel Pablo is a volunteer instructor who has taught this course for more than eight years, most recently for the Woodbridge Senior Center and for OLLI.

1003BT Beyond Happy

Thursday, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 17
Tallwood
Instructor: Beth Cabrera
Would you like to live a more joyful, meaningful life? Dr. Beth Cabrera will present a simple, yet powerful model of well-being, based on research in positive psychology that you can use to transform your life. You will learn specific steps that can be taken to reduce stress, increase happiness, and live a more authentic, purpose-driven life.
Beth Cabrera graduated from the Georgia Institute of Psychology with a PhD in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. She is a senior scholar at George Mason University’s Center for the Advancement of Well-Being and the author of Beyond Happy: Women, Work, and Well-Being.

 

1004BT Beyond Happy

Thursday, 11:50–1:15, Sept. 17
Loudoun
Instructor: Beth Cabrera
This is a videoconference of 1003BT.

 

1005BT A History of Shame, and Why It Matters

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Sept. 18
Tallwood
Instructor: Peter Stearns
American shame has a distinct history. The emotion was widely used and accepted in colonial times, then declined rapidly in acceptability in the 19th century. The US is contrasted with other societies where shame has lasted longer. But what is particularly interesting is a recent revival of shame, and lots of controversy about whether the emotion is useful or not. An emotion’s history doesn’t sort out all the problems, but it helps, and can stimulate intelligent discussion.
Peter N. Stearns is Provost Emeritus of George Mason. He has written or edited 120 books and published widely in modern social history, including Doing Emotions History. Forthcoming works include: Guiding the American University: Contemporary Problems and Prospects. He is currently completing A History of Shame for University of Illinois Press.

 

1006BT A History of Shame, and Why It Matters

Friday, 1:00–2:30, Sept. 18
Loudoun
Instructor: Peter Stearns
This is a videoconference of 1005BT.

 

1007BT Current Transportation Issues in Virginia

Monday, 10:00–11:30, Dec. 7
Note time
Tallwood
Coordinator: Stephanie Trachtenberg
Transportation is an issue affecting all Virginians, particularly those who live and work in Northern Virginia. Join State Senator David Marsden as he discusses the current transportation issues including mass transit, high occupancy toll lanes, and road construction.
Senator David Marsden represents the 37th district in the Virginia Senate. He served in the Virginia House of Delegates from 2006-2009 and was elected to the Virginia Senate in 2010. He serves on the Transportation and Local Government committees, as well as the Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources committee. He is a lifelong resident of Northern Virginia. Dave Marsden and Julia, his wife of 40 years, have lived in Burke since 1977.

 

1008BT  Remembering Ol’ Blue Eyes: A Sinatra Centenary (Part 4)

Tuesday, 10:00–12:30, Dec. 8
Note time
Tallwood
Moderator: Marianne Metz
Just a few days before Frank Sinatra’s 100th birthday, we conclude our four-part centennial salute to Sinatra’s movies. This time we see him in his latter-day incarnation as leader of the Rat Pack. The 1964 release Robin and the Seven Hoods is an updated Robin Hood story set in Prohibition-era Chicago. It’s a stylish musical in which Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis, Jr., all shine. They are joined in song by Bing Crosby (who was brought in to replace Peter Lawford after a Sinatra/Lawford falling-out). Peter Falk and Barbara Rush also star, and Edward G. Robinson makes a cameo appearance. We will see Robin and the Seven Hoods in its entirety. What a way to go!
See 1001BT for moderator information.

 

1009BT You’ll Go Nuts for The Nutcracker!
(Lunch, Movie, and Popcorn—plus a Cookie Sale)

Tuesday, 11:30–2:30, Dec. 15
Tallwood
Coordinator: Martha Powers
A ballet favorite during the holidays, The Nutcracker is a delightful tradition, and The Royal Ballet’s production has been a beloved and top-rated winner for decades. At the time of this recording (2009), the gorgeous Peter Wright production was in its 25th year—and it is still the version that The Royal Ballet offers at Covent Garden today. This captivating performance features an exquisite Sugar Plum Fairy (Miyako Yoshida), chivalrous Prince (Steven McRae), the mysterious Drosselmeyer (Gary Avis), and vibrant dancing by the corps de ballet. You’ll be tapping your toes to Tchaikovsky’s ravishing orchestrations of the “Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy,” “Waltz of the Flowers,” and many other memorable melodies. We’ll start with BYO Lunch and a half-hour for socializing, then move on to free popcorn, a brief presentation about the ballet, and then the two-hour movie. Homemade cookies will be available for sale to benefit Friends of OLLI.

 

1101  New Member Coffee

Friday, 10:00, Sept. 25
Tallwood
Coordinator: Sandy Driesslein
All members, but especially new members, are cordially invited for coffee, refreshments, and conversation. Here’s an opportunity for you to meet some of our instructors, staff, board members, and committee chairs, to get answers to any questions you may have, and to tell us about yourself and your interests. Registration for this event will be taken on a first come, first served basis.

1102  Chili Cook Off

Friday, 12:30–3:30. Oct. 16
Rose Gallery at Reston Community Center Lake Anne
Coordinator: Beth Lambert
What better way to conclude a Board of Directors meeting in Reston than with a Chili Cook Off? We know there are as many varieties of chili as there are innovative cooks, and this is a perfect opportunity to share the riches. We will also need corn bread, so the less-aspiring cooks among us will be able to make a contribution. (Practical matter: there will be plugs available at the Rose Gallery for those bringing crock pots.) Come, catch up on the latest Board of Directors news, and enjoy the culinary talents of your (fellow) OLLI cooks. Registration is on a first come, first served basis. SIGN UP SHEETS WILL BE AVAILABLE AT ALL 3 CAMPUSES.

 

1103  It’s Not Just Reading the Announcements: Liaison Training for Everyone

Friday, 12:30–2:00, Nov. 13
Tallwood
Coordinator: Martha Powers
Are you an OLLI member instructor? An experienced liaison who has never attended training? A curious OLLI member who might want to be a liaison someday? Then this session is for you! We’ll talk about aspects of liaising that are not so obvious, as well as the ways to optimize the announcement-reading function. Liaisons can help make our classes the best they can be, and they also offer our non-OLLI member presenters a warm welcome and a helping hand. Please join us for a participative discussion about how to be a great liaison—and we’ll provide free pizza to guarantee your time is well spent! Registration is on a first come, first served basis.

 

1104 Annual OLLI Holiday Party

Friday, 11:30–3:00, Dec. 4
International Country Club, Fairfax
Coordinator: Sandy Driesslein
Event limit: 200
The party starts at 11:30 when the cash bar opens and lunch will begin at noon. The Recorder Group will be playing as you enter the dining room, and after lunch the Readers Theatre Group will entertain. The Tallwood Trio is expected to provide the music throughout. At the end there will be door prizes that are always a hit. Your entrée choices are chicken or pasta. The meal includes a salad, coffee or tea, and dessert. Registration will be taken on a first come, first served basis. You can indicate your choice of entrée and pay the $35 fee when you register. The International country club is located at 13200 Lee Jackson Memorial Hwy, Fairfax, VA 22033.

 

Ongoing Activities

Book Club

Wednesdays, Sept. 10, Dec. 10, 10:00–11:30
Wednesdays, Oct. 8, Nov. 12, 1:30–3:00
Tallwood
Coordinator: Ceda McGrew 703-323-9671
On September 10 we plan to discuss Yellow Star by Jennifer Rozines Roy. The October 8 selection will be The Light between Oceans by M. L. Stedman. On November 12 we will discuss The Uncommon Reader by Alan Bennett and on December 10 we will discuss Book by Book by Michael Dirda. All OLLI members are welcome.

Bridge Club

Wednesdays
Sept. 3–Sept. 10, Nov. 19, Dec. 3–Dec. 17, 10:00–12:00
Sept. 17–Nov. 12, 1:45–3:45
Tallwood
Coordinators: Susanne Zumbro 703-569-2750
Gordon Canyock 703-425-4607
Drop in and enjoy the friendly atmosphere of “party bridge.” Skill levels vary from advanced beginner to aspiring expert. Partnerships are rotated every four hands.

 

Calling All Theater Lovers! (new)

Sign up for e-list today
Coordinators: Norma Reck, Nancy Scheeler

We are developing an e-mail list of those OLLI members who are interested in attending the theater. For example, we will choose a play, date, and time, then e-mail list members the info. Those interested will e-mail their intent to attend the performance with other interested OLLI members (and their guests). Meeting points, transportation, dinner or lunch options, etc., will be addressed. No need to miss another play you want to see. Send an email titled “Yes, I want to do theater” along with your name and email address to Norma at njreck@cs.com or Nancy at nscheeler@verizon.net. A fun, informal way to do theater!

 

Classic Fiction Book Club

Fourth Fridays
Sept. 26, Oct. 24, Nov. 21
Coordinator: Sigrid Blalock 703-723-6825

The book selection for September 26 is One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Alexander Solzhenitsyn. On October 24 the book selection is Joseph Andrews by Henry Fielding and for November 21 the book is A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute. The book club welcomes new members. Note that the November date is the Friday before Thanksgiving week.

 

Classic Literature Club

Fridays
Sept. 25–Oct. 30, Nov. 13
Tallwood
Coordinator: Bob Zener 703-237-0492

This club was formed to discuss great works of world literature. This fall the club plans to read and discuss Dostoyevsky’s short novel, Notes from the Underground, and his longer novel, Crime and Punishment. The club welcomes new members. Anyone planning to attend the meeting on September 25 should read Notes from the Underground.

 

Cooking Club

Monthly dates to be determined
Tallwood
Coordinator: Ute Christoph-Hill
This is a club for OLLI members who enjoy preparing food and sharing hands-on, homemade dishes in a small-group setting during the day, sometimes in members’ homes and other times at Tallwood or alternative sites. We often have a theme for our meetings, but our format is flexible. We also participate in other food-related events, such as ethnic cooking demonstrations and restaurant outings. If these activities appeal to you, please contact Ute at utehill@cox.net for more information. All OLLI members are welcome.

 

Cottage Art

Tuesdays
Aug. 19–Sept. 16, Nov. 18, Dec. 2–Dec. 16, 9:30–12:00
Tallwood
Coordinator: Sue Goldstein ms.goldstein@verizon.net
All artists, whether you use pencil, ink, pastels, charcoal, or water color, are welcome to finish or start pictures. The group consists of OLLI members who have taken a variety of OLLI art classes. Skill levels range from beginner to advanced. The only way to improve is to practice. Come join us.

 

Craft and Conversation Group

Weekly
Dates and times to be determined
Tallwood
Coordinators: Doris Bloch 703-591-3344
Pam Cooper-Smuzynski 703-455-2716
The meeting schedule is flexible, but we plan to meet weekly to work on our craft projects and to share product sources, expertise and inspiration. The date, time and place of our meetings can be found on the OLLI website in the OLLI Ongoing Events calendar for the week. We cordially invite any interested OLLI members to drop in andjoin us, or just see what we are creating. For further information, contact Doris Bloch at dbloch50@hotmail.com or Pam Cooper-Smuzynski at pamcs2@verizon.net.

 

History Club

First Wednesdays
Oct. 1, Nov. 5, 2:15–3:40
Tallwood
Coordinator: Beth Lambert 703-624-6356
The club welcomes OLLI members who are interested in discussing historical events and sharing reviews of articles, books or interesting topics. The club maintains a list of books that members have found worthwhile, which can be viewed at www.olli.gmu.edu/historyclubbooklist.pdf. If you would like to receive email notification of upcoming History Club meetings, contact elizabethlambert7@gmail.com.

 

Homer, etc.

Fridays
Aug. 22–Oct. 31, Nov. 14–Nov. 21, Dec. 5–Dec. 19, 11:00–12:30
Tallwood
Coordinator: Jan Bohall 703-273-1146
Join us to read aloud a traditional or contemporary classic. We are now reading George Eliot’s Middlemarch and will soon be choosing our next book. Drop in at the Tallwood Annex any Friday morning—new members are always welcome. For more information email the coordinator at jbohall@verizon.net.

 

Knitting and Needlework Club

Tuesdays
Sept. 16–Dec. 16, 10:00
Reston
Coordinator: Sheila Gold 703-860-8798
Do you love to knit, crochet or needlepoint? Do you want to learn? We welcome both beginners and more advanced needleworkers. There is always someone who is happy to teach the new student. Come and join us on Tuesday mornings at the Panera in Herndon. For more information please contact Sheila at sheila.gold@verizon.net.

 

Mah Jongg Club

First and Third Wednesdays
Sept. 3, Sept. 17, Nov. 19, Dec. 3, Dec. 17, 10:00–12:00
Oct. 1, Oct. 15, Nov. 5, 1:30–3:30
Tallwood
Coordinator: Liz Bateman
We welcome all members who want to learn the game of mah jongg or already know how to play. Stretch your mind and have fun with a game that is (maybe) easier than bridge, but definitely challenging! For more information, contact Liz at concordiaeb@verizon.net.

 

Memoir—and More—Writing Group

Weekly
Tallwood
Coordinator: Betty Smith
We meet Wednesdays, except during the fall and spring terms when the Memoir Writing class is in session. We bring copies of our writing and gently discuss each other’s work. Our focus is memoir, but we also include fiction, poetry and personal essay. We’re a small group, mostly students from Dianne Hennessy King’s Memoir Writing class. Any level is welcome, including beginner—all we ask is that you want to improve your writing and help us improve ours. If you’re interested in joining us, please contact Betty (e-mail listed in member directory) for more information.

 

Personal Computer User Group

Third Saturdays
Sept. 20, Oct. 18, Nov. 15, Dec. 13 (note this is the 2nd Saturday), 1:00–3:30
Tallwood
Coordinator: Paul Howard phoward@gmu.edu
In partnership with Potomac Area Technology and Computer Society (PATACS), we focus on Windows computers and software, the Internet, smart phones and tablet apps, digital photography, related technology, Android and Linux operating systems and Open Source software. Our aim is to bring broad subject-matter expertise about technology and topics of interest to both groups. PC Clinics are offered twice yearly. Our target audience encompasses beginners to intermediate amateurs and our methodology is “users helping users.” Club dues of $5 are payable at the first meeting attended in each calendar year. More details are available on the group’s website, www.olligmu.org/~opcug.

 

Photography Club

Second Fridays
Sept. 12, Oct. 10, Nov. 14, Dec. 12, 9:30–11:30
Fourth Fridays
Aug. 22, Sept. 26, Oct. 24, 12:00–2:00
Tallwood
Coordinator: Dan Feighery
Meet with others interested in photography and develop skills by participating in the monthly theme photo submissions. Be informed, and perhaps inspired, by expert speakers. The Photography Club welcomes all members, whether they use a basic camera or specialized equipment, and whether they are new to photo-graphy or have had years of experience. We discuss technical aspects of photography as well as the artistic aspects of visual design. On the fourth Friday of the month, workshops will cover specific topics in more detail. Contact Dan Feighery at Dandj_ffx_va@cox.net for further information.

 

Recorder Consort

Fridays
Aug. 22–Oct. 31, Nov. 14–Nov. 21, Dec. 5–Dec. 19, 9:00–11:30
Tallwood
Coordinator: Helen Ackerman
helenackerman@hotmail.com
If you have been a part of the Consort or have previously played the recorder and would like to expand your abilities, join us on Fridays. There will be some on-and-off-campus performances and music may need to be purchased.

 

Religious Studies Club (new)

Second and Fourth Fridays
Sept. 25, Oct. 9, Oct. 23, Nov. 13, Dec. 11, 12:00–2:00
Tallwood
Coordinator: Steve Goldman
This new club is designed to provide a forum for ongoing discussions and explorations of a wide range of religious studies topics. All OLLI members with an interest are welcome, including those of any faith traditions as well as seekers, secular humanists, agnostics, and atheists. The participants will shape the club’s agenda, format and focus. No topic will be considered too controversial or off-limits for discussion. Some of the initial topics to be explored will include the following:
● What principles do religions hold in common and where are the differences?
● Are some actions inherently good or evil – or does it depend on the situation?
● How does one identify a “sacred text?”

 

Spanish Club (new)

Second and Fourth Wednesdays
Sept. 30, Oct. 14, Oct. 28, Nov. 11, 1:45–3:15
Tuesday, Dec. 8, 10:00–11:30
Tallwood
Coordinators: Dick Cheadle dbcheadle@verizon.net
Lois Lightfoot lelghtft@outlook.com
This is a new club designed for persons who are more or less at the intermediate stage in understanding and speaking Spanish; people further advanced than 1-2-3, a-b-c, but not fluent. The person leading a particular class will decide the subject for that class. Members will not have to participate beyond a level where they feel comfortable.

 

Tai Chi Club

Saturdays
10:30–11:30
Tallwood
Coordinators: Russell Stone 703-323-4428
Susanne Zumbro 703-569-2750
The Tai Chi Club meets every Saturday in TA-3. It is open to all OLLI members on a first come-first served basis.

 

The Tom Crooker Investment Forum

Wednesdays
Aug. 20–Sept. 17, Nov. 19, Dec. 3–17, 10:30–12:00
Tallwood
Moderator: Al Smuzynski
See course F203 for activity description.

 

Travel Club

Fourth Fridays
Sept. 26, 9:00
Oct. 24, 9:30
Tallwood
Coordinator: Shelly Gersten 703-385-2638
The club welcomes any and all who are interested in domestic or international travel. OLLI members have a vast wealth of experience in both traveling and living in other parts of the United States and the world. Come share your experiences and learn from others. We also try to identify common interests so that members can plan to travel together. In addition, we organize occasional local trips where we carpool to sites within a drive of 60 to 90 minutes, including historic homes and museums.

 

Walking Group

Weekly
Tallwood/Fairfax Swimming Pool Parking Lot
Coordinators: Doris Bloch 703-591-3344
Sherry Hart 703-978-0848
When OLLI is in session, the Walking Group meets one morning a week, generally an hour before the first morning class. We gather in the Fairfax Pool parking lot next to Tallwood and walk for about 45 minutes, arriving back in time for the start of classes. All levels of walking ability and speed are accommodated—our goal is camaraderie as well as exercise. Based on which day is most convenient for the majority of participants, we set the day of the week for our walks during the first week of the term. Between terms we continue to walk on a weekly basis, but for longer distances and at more varied locations. Contact Sherry Hart at harts66@hotmail.com or Doris Bloch at dbloch50@hotmail.comfor information.

 

What’s in the Daily News? Continued

Mondays
Aug. 18–Sept. 15, Nov. 17, Dec. 1–Dec. 15, 10:00–11:30
Tallwood
Facilitator: Don Allen 703-830-3060
This is an out-of-term continuation of What’s in the Daily News? for news junkies who can’t wait for the next term to express their opinions and discuss current events. It’s a small group and the facilitator expects it to be self-moderating.